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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956
File 027
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 027. 1956-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 27, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/236.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-09). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 027. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/236

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 027, 1956-09, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 27, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/236.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date September 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 027
Transcript interest me, brought me a copy of The Call, a Socialist Publication. That paper gave a new turn to my thinking. I sought other copies. I felt my heart beat with excitement as I read the articles on social justice. For the first time 1 felt a call, a vocation. Unconsciously I enlisted, emotionally, in the army of those who said they would fight social injustice. During my four years at Evander Childs, I received good marks in English history and science, and won a state scholarship which helped me to go to college. In the autumn I entered Hunter, the New York City college for Women. I had decided to become a teacher. I started with a determination to learn. There were many fields I wanted to explore. I lived at home and traveled back and forth e-'ch day on the new Pelham Bay Subway. My religious training had been superficial. As a child I •lad gone to church with Mamarella. I had been taught to say my prayers. In our house hung various holy pictures "nd the crucifix. But I knew nothing of the doctrines °f faith. If I held any belief it was that we should dedicate Ourselves to love of our fellow man. T * Hi: teacher who affected me most was Sarah Parks, who |*Ught English. From her I first heard favorable talk about jjie Russian Revolution. She compared it with the French "evolution which she said had had a great liberalizing ''■bet on European culture, something which the Revolu- •°n in Russia would also one day accomplish. She brought 0 class books on communism and lent them to us. To us vvho loved her Sarah Parks brought fresh air into •Sterile intellectual atmosphere when- scholarship some- "11'-'s seemed pointless and where Phi Beta Kappa keys *ere garnered by grinds. She led a busy life because so V-any of us wanted to consult her. She was an important actor in preparing us to accept a materialistic society. I *"> sure she did help some students, but she did little for nose who were already so emptied of convictions that hey believed in nothing. They could only turn their steps °Ward the great delusion of our time, toward the Socialist- communist philosophy of Karl Marx. In my junior year I was elected president of my class. ('V|'ial of my friends and 1 became involved in student government. To Student Council meetings bright young wis brought all sorts of dazzling proposals and I, ready "support the experimental and the new, listened eagerly. , e had, all of us, a strong will to goodness. We saw a •eak present and wanted to turn it into a wonderful ''hire for the poor and the troubled. But we had no foitn- •'hon In,- solid thinking. We had no real goals because , e had no sound view of man's nature and destiny. We a<i feelings and emotions, but no standards, in my senior year I was elected president of Student oiineil. That year I led the movement to establish the ,°nor system at Hunter. Also I brought politics into stu- ent government by conducting the first straw vote in the residential election. A little iater I upset the Dean by '-'sting on a series of lectures on social hygiene. I was jr-Ported by a group of school politicians and I learned e value of a tightly organized group and was exhilarated * the power it gave. , '" June, 1925, I was graduated with honors. I obtained Position as substitute teacher in the History Department Raphael's "Sistinc Madonna," on altar piece of which Bella V. Dodd wrote, "Il was worth Ihe long trip to see the lovely Virgin and Child and the cherubs at their feet looking like gay little urchins." This priceless painting was removed from Dresden by thc USSR at the end of World War II. Its fate was unknown until November, 1955, when it was placed on exhibit in the Soviet sector of Berlin. cal Science Department at Hunter College, called and offered me a post at the college. 1 began teaching freshman political science at Hunter College in February, 1926. I enrolled in the graduate school at Columbia University for graduate work in political science. '' Seward Park High School. The school term was to end 'In- beginning of February. Some time after the turn of e Hew year in 1926, Dr. Dawson, chairman of the Politi- (. ACTs Forum News, September, 1956 vFnk of my courses at Columbia was a study of the United States Senate and its treaty-making powers. Some of tbe professors wondered why l.indscy Rogers, who taught it, regarded this topic as important enough to devote an entire course to it. It was then onlv a few years after the Missouri i. Holland decision based on a treaty relating to migratory birds - and the pattern of treaty law had not yet become apparent to many. I was fascinated by the subject and its implications. There were other refreshingly new courses that year and new professors, among them Raymond Moley. not yet a Roosevelt brain truster. We young people were intrigued by the possibilities of participation in government control and the various means of achieving this. In our enthusiasm we passed on to our students at Hunter what we had learned. We challenged the traditional thinking they bad brought to college with them. Before long we were saying that the radicals today are the conservatives of tomorrow, that there could be no progress if there were no radicals. I have since had many occasions to see that this cataloguing of people as either "right" or "left" has led to confusion. It sounds so simple Page 25
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