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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956
File 026
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 026. 1956-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 15, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/235.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-09). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 026. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/235

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 026, 1956-09, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 15, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/235.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date September 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 026
Transcript INTRODUCTION I his is a true story of well-nigh incredible events as they took place, and of the progress of a sensitive soul from the torments of darkness into the relief of light. The narrator is Dr. Bella V. Dodd, formerly a member of the Communist Party, U.S.A.; later transformed by analytical intellect and searching conscience into a loyal American citizen. SCHOOL OF DARKNESS A CONDENSATION I was born in October, 1904, in Picerno, southern Italy. I am really an American born on Italian soil as the result of a series of accidents; it was also an accident which kept me in Italy until I was almost six years old. My foster mother was the wife of a shepherd in Avia- lano. Her own baby died and she was happy to have me. For five years I lived with these simple people. Though there was little luxury in the small stone house, I received loving care. In later days, when life was difficult, f often wished I were again the little child who sat there snug in the protecting love about her. My mother sent money regularly, and gave my foster parents more comforts than the small wages of a hill shepherd could provide. I have vague memories of the things of religion. Mama- rella said though I was young she was going to have me confirmed because the bishop was coming to our town to perform the ceremony. This called for great preparations. I had a new red dress with a high neck made "princess style." When the great day came I was at church early. It was still almost empty save for the restless group of children awaiting confirmation. The few seats in the big church were placed toward the altar. You did not sit in those: they were for the gentry of the town. Everyone else knelt on the stone floor. I knelt, too, and looked around me at the statues. I had a favorite — St. Anthony, with the tender smile and the Christ Child on His arm. I was glad when my mother came for me. and we sailed for America. The reason my mother had not returned to Italy for five long years, my father later explained, was that there bad been a terrible depression in America. It had been impossible for him to raise the money for Mother to make the trip, and a small child could not travel alone. I was shv in meeting my father. He was blond, blue-eyed, and reserved, the opposite of Mother. But despite his quiet, undemonstrative manner I felt that he loved me. He was kind and made a pet of me. Page 24 There were only four children at home; the rest had married and had homes of their own. They came to *('c the new sister and made a fuss over me. But they all made fun of my best dress — my red confirmation dress wide*- every child in Avialano had admired. They laughed at m? and insisted I he rushed to a store to buy an America* dress. With great reluctance I put away the beautiful 1^\ princess dress and with it the last of my Italian years. A"' I turned with zeal to the task of becoming an America*' child. IVlv seventeen-year-old sister. Caterina, called by *'" American name of Katie, took me in hand. She was beO" . tiful, kind, and gentle. She insisted on calling me 1'°' \ [short for Isabella]. , Katie took me to school. She had made up her mind was a smart little thing and so she got me in a ff\ ahead by saying I was born in 1902. In those days s", had no difficulty in having me enrolled in the secon grade. For a few days I was pursued by cries of vv "1 j wop," but I paid no attention. I did not know what the meant. By the time I did I had been accepted as a lead' in my class. , In four months I was able to speak English well enoue to enjoy the school I attended — Public School NumD , One. When I was ready for the third grade we m°\t from East Harlem to Westchester, and several years la" to a big rambling house and sixty-four acres of land, '"' Castle Hill. In this home the rest of my youth was sp''" Life in that community was peaceful. , In the fall of 1917 I started at Evander Childs II1'-, School. The student body then numbered more than i thousand boys and girls. We were alike in that we **JJ children of parents in modest circumstances, neither f . nor poor. No one attempted to accentuate our different' or to exploit them. j One day a girl from the East Bronx with whom I '*' i talked about politics, a subject which was beginning F vi is Forum News, September. /<-'
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