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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 019. 1956-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 21, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/228.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-09). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 019. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/228

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 019, 1956-09, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 21, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/228.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date September 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 019
Transcript bert ene Castb ,at we I"*' without i* UA disclo^ ed appro"1 USIA's mi* ieen. 11 ism and <!i ed undet ■ ■* is K tion m me an ones v ices par"1'' hows tha'J ?nt can c»J rices a'-:-"1;', rty mernbn it against-* st the peofl *nd those of the free world are going to be fooled by that in the slightest. I jjoubt if it even fools the people of Russia itself." As a matter of fact, Mr. Streibert," farted Moderator Hurleigh, "hasn't * been said that the speech by Mr. JpTushchev — the downgrading of Stalin — was actually leaked in some degree to the outside world in order to help their present propaganda — and that behind the Iron Curtain, *«ere you are beaming this informa- °n, it has not been allowed to be Published?" Mr. Streibert acknowledged that ^s vvas correct. "They try to keep il *oret," he stated, "and obviously for Purpose. In fact, most surprisingly, *n editorial in the Daily Worker criti- ■J-'ed the Kremlin for handling it in tta's way." AVell, actually, though," asked Mr. ''na, "wasn't it supposed to be ^nrtishchev's id&i to give it to the People of the Soviet Union piecemeal, a measured campaign?" , It may be that," replied Mr. Strei- 31- "You can't fathom their purposes. ^Ushchev did say at the end of his Seech, as you know, that it must be *Pt from the press. What their purpose Was> or jlow c]evjolls their means .accomplishing it, we do not know. 1 we know is that this is an enor- 0,Js risk that they are taking." against erica did "" , but t*4 ved to 1"''' tinted <>»' s then •egiine <"'',, hy lo, not wof on il "although -nts ol t. We ■ inted ext. V real pu^ lselves. ' tion of rtj ing the J ed with \ ;todo ellitc p'1*'1' embi 0/*l Broadcasts Jammed „ *n answer to Mr. O'Connor's qnes- °n regarding whether the Russians ,ere attempting to jam the Voice of nierica broadcasts of Khrushchev's yPeech as they have other USIA or 5. ICe of America broadcasts, Mr. ^eibert answered in the affirmative. 1, Ihat prompts the question," put in a,- O'Connor, "how effective do you j" "k that the Voice of America broad . is are? Are the Russians succeeding Jamming them?" ^ »es," replied Mr. Streibert, "but ^ Set through. You see, we have so ,. "y frequencies and there are so ■^"y different reception conditions. ^ get constant reports from people ti'lg out of the Soviet as well as m . satellites — newspaper people — j ''Cri indicate that we do get through w '"'"g. Our own program director Is there only a few weeks ago. He v. rd the Voice right in the middle of Vow." \,r' Streibert, asked by Mr. O'Con- ^ *°r an estimate of the size of audi- • being reached behind the Iron ^s Forum News, September, 1956 Curtain, said that there is no means of telling. However, it is a regular practice, he disclosed, to ask everyone coming out of Russia, diplomatic people, visitors, newsmen, etc., whether they have heard anything about the Voice. "We find," he concluded, "that people are aware of what is said on the Voice, and that people do hear it. We have regular meetings of our agency personnel to appraise information received which leads to this definite conclusion." "You mention, for the most part, people coming out of Moscow," Mr. O'Connor said. "I am wondering in the vast steppes of Southern Russia, and in the sections which we would probably term 'rural areas' in this country — is the average peasant or Russian person getting these . .'." "No," replied Mr. Streibert, "we don't think that the average peasant owns a receiving set. We are getting to a higher grade of person, who may be a manager or submanager. or a Party functionary of some kind. These are probably Party people for the most part, but not exclusively so by any means." "Propaganda" vs. Factual News "Do you think that our propaganda has much effect upon the average Partv member?" asked Mr. O'Connor. "Well, you misunderstand what we are trying to do," Mr. Streibert replied. "We are not trying to propagandize those people against the Communist Party when they are members of tin- Party. . ." "You say we don't hope to influence them or change their minds?" interrupted Mr. O'Connor. "That would be like propagandizing us against freedom and democracy," replied Mr. Streibert. "It would fall on deaf ears. What we are trying to do is to give them the news of the outside world as it really happens — particularly the news about the United States and about Western powers so that they will get the facts about what is happening and what our policies really are." "But for what purpose, Mr. Streibert," inquired Mr. O'Connor, "if we don't hope to change their minds?" "A very specific purpose," Mr. Streibert insisted. "If they find that what is actually going on in the outside Western world is different from what they are learning from the Kremlin, it begins to open up doubts as to the validity of the Kremlin's statements on all matters having to do with foreign policy and perhaps will ultimately shake their faith." "Then we do hope," Mr. O'Connor said, "that it's not falling on deaf ears — that we may influence them to some degree." "Well, yes, but we are not doing it by exhortation and by what you call 'propaganda,'" stressed Mr. Streibert. "We think, as I say, that news of the outside world and commentary, or explanations of what is going on in the United States, and what we are like — that those things have an effect." Stalin's Demotion Shakes Faith Mr. Prina questioned Mr. Streibert regarding recent reports that reveal worry on the part of satellite Communists over the deglorification of Stalin. "Communists outside Russia are asking the question," he stated, "why did these people laud Stalin until very recently, and now start saying that he vv as such a tyrant?" "It causes great confusion in Communist Party ranks, which makes it a very fine development," said Mr. Streibert. "We are trying to promote it all we can." Moderator Hurleigh and Mr. Prina joined in bringing up the point that this has been true in Italy, in this country, and in France, as well as in Communist China, — that it is almost akin to the Stalin pact with Hitler. "Yes. it's a complete switch," Mr. Streibert agreed, "and a different line. 1 don't see how it can fail to shake the faith of anv intelligent person." "Mr. Streibert, may I ask you one more question on the handling of this speech?" asked Mr. Prina. "Obviously you were in on the ground floor of high government discussions as to how to handle it — the State Department announcement, and so forth. There have been reports that there was a considerable body of opinion among the top government officials that this speech should not be put out by the Department, but that it should perhaps be leaked out, or handled infor- mallv. Can vou tell us anything about that?" Mr. Streibert explained that he participated onlv- in the decision that it should be released in total. Although there was some question of whether to release parts of the speech at a time, in his opinion there was general agreement that the whole document should be released at once. (Continued on page 47) Page 17
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