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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 015. 1956-09. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 23, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/224.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-09). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 015. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/224

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956 - File 015, 1956-09, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 23, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/279/show/224.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 9, September 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date September 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 015
Transcript THE CASE FOR FLUORIDATION Those who are opposed to fluoridation have not produced on their own any evidence that fluoride is not efficacious or that it is ''armful. Their objections are mainly theoretical and, to paraphrase an old j-hinese proverb, one good experiment K Worth one thousand opinions.29 The conscientious and highly gained members of federal, state, and '°cal public health professional assertions study critically the investigations in their field and do not lightly 0r carelessly endorse proposals for Preventive health measures whose con- livable harm might outweigh the benefits.30 Dental caries has been described as l^e most prevalent disease in the United States today. Decayed teeth "e a major school problem. , A measure to control dental caries 18 "ow available in the fluoridation of j^Tnunity water supplies. Water fluoridation is economically feasible. a"d its effectiveness has been demon- ttated — it is no longer in the pio- "eering experimental stage.:" *°w We Learned About Fluorides A search for the cause of "mottled ."artiel" led to the discovery of fluor- e in water supplies in 1931. Re- *arch demonstrated that the severity dental fluorosis, as this disease came be called, is proportional to the "'"'mt of fluoride present in drinking i'"er during that period of child- °°d when the teeth are being formed, .J"' that, in the temperate climates of oe United States, endemic dental '""osis does not begin to constitute a Public health problem until the , [pride in the water supply exceeds 5 Parts per million. /» comprehensive epidemiological jNv by the research staff of the ,National Institute of Health estab- ^ (a) that children 12 to 14 years i. aSc who have continuously, since nr"', used water with an optimal aJ^ride concentration, have in general (N't two-thirds less dental decay j,an do children who have used lluor- (ie"f|ec drinking water, and (b) that ( ,'s lessened amount of dental caries c. °ws the use of domestic water con- i(j'n"ig as little as 1.0 ppm of fluor- ^s — a fluoride concentration low '"'gh not to cause dental fluorosis or ■"-ottl, ng.i Fluorine a Familiar Dietary Substance Fluorine is present in so many common foods that the average adult diet throughout the United States contains from 0.25 to 0.30 mg. of fluorides per day. Fish is relatively high in fluorine. Pablum, a widely used baby food, has or has had from 8.0 to 15.0 ppm. Tea leaves have a high concentration, ranging from 30.0 to 60.0 ppm. Liver, which is prescribed as one of our health-giving foods, contains fluorine.82 However, these food-borne fluorides are insufficient for optimal dental health, and many persons consider it practicable to make up this deficiency by adjusting the fluoride concentration of the public water supply. At least three million people in the United States, residents of 845 communities in twenty-seven states, use a community water supply in which fluorides in concentrations of 1.0 ppm or higher are naturally present. In many cases these water supplies have been in use for generations. Except for dental fluorosis when the fluoride concentration is high, the health of these people is apparently comparable to that of people who reside in nearby fluoride-free communities. Studies reveal that cumulative toxic effects following the use of such water are highly improbable. A review published in 1950 summarized the evidence pointing to the conclusion that there is no public health hazard in the use of drinking water containing 1.0 ppm of fluorides.33 Newburgh-Kingsron, N. Y„ Tests Newburgh and Kingston, New York, located about thirty-five miles apart on the Hudson River, each with a population of about thirty thousand and each using a fluoride-deficient water supply, were chosen lor comparative study of the effects of fluoridation. Newburgh's water supply was treated with sodium fluoride on May 2, 1945, bringing its fluoride content up to 1.0, while Kingston served as the control area, continuing to use fluoride-deficient water without change. After ten years of fluoride experience, dental clinical and roentgeno- graphic examinations reveal that chil- ^s FonuM News, September. 1956 dren ages six to nine in Newburgh who had been drinking fluoridated water all of their lives had a DMF (Decayed, Missing, and Filled) rate for permanent teeth 58 per cent lower than did Kingston children of the same age. There were about six times as many children in Newburgh, ages six to nine, who had all their deciduous cuspids and deciduous molars present and caries free than noted in Kingston. Among the 438 children in Newburgh vvho had had continuous residence since fluoridation began, forty- six children had questionable fluorosis, twenty-six had very mild fluorosis, and six showed mild fluorosis. There were no instances of moderate or severe mottling. Questionable, \'ery mild, and mild fluorosis involve slight whitish flecks or opaque areas on the enamel surface without any breaks in surface continuity, excessive wear or staining. Classification of fluorosis in these degrees is based wholly on the extent of the tooth surface involved, and only a highly trained eye can detect these stages of mottling. None of the instances of dental fluorosis in Newburgh children was disfiguring. The Newburgh-Kingston study has demonstrated beyond question the effectiveness and safety of water fluoridation as a public health procedure.34 Natural vs. Controlled Fluoridation The only difference between natural and controlled fluoridation from a chemical standpoint is that natural fluoride enters the water supply through leaching of fluoride-bearing rock traversed by water, as compared lo the controlled addition of fluoride compounds by machinery. The form of the fluorine in the water in either case is that of the fluoride ion. It is of (Continued on page 44) -'Tbell, Earl, Science Editor ol the .Wtr York Herald Tribune, from Town Meeting. Bulletin of America's Town Meeting of thc Air, May 20, 1954. ^St. Louis Medical Society, "Water Fluoridation." Missouri Medicine, February, 1954, pp. 124- 142. "'Dean, 11. Trcndlcy, D.D.S., former dental director of U. S. Public Health Service, "Fluoridation: Mass Control for Dental Caries." Amertoflfl Journal nl Nursing, February, 1952. -Kmitson, John VV ., D.D.S., Dr. P. H., "An Evaluation of the Grand Rapids Water Fluoridation Project," flu- Journal ol The Michigan stole Medical Society, September, 1954. "Dean, op. <it A. Mliurch-Kiiiuston Caries-Fluorine Study: Final Report," The Journal of tin- American Denial Association, March. 1956, pp. 290-325. Page 13
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