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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956
File 051
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956 - File 051. 1956-01. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 18, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/209/show/190.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-01). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956 - File 051. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/209/show/190

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956 - File 051, 1956-01, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 18, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/209/show/190.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. V, No. 1, January 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date January 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 051
Transcript ppropriations \A\ h and edu1 ost ,lf tin- g«*1 re it onlv a l'ltl lat's why I h°l ds of the \"lfl d join on ei I e, that will brj< ressive m'i&rlew Frontiers for Freedom give truth .it l; is. Green and Co., Y.. I?54, 116 pp., ts LutWL" D" c"ha"3. Longma , c I nill! 25 ' New Vork 3' N' the final f*2M- j Erwin 1). Canham. Ktlitor of The Christum Science Monitor, looks over the pasl few decades and funis the pic- llnre generally satisfying. His hook views HlltrOKi l"VM'"' *""* 1|'1" fm"'!* with optimism. " Mr- < "inlieiin acknowledges the facl that profound change has taken place in Iie American economic system during tins century. Indeed. New Frontiers for treed,,,,, attempts an analysis of whal s change' heis been and whal il means or the fulure of our country. In litis ''."'> lllr author is particularly intrigued wilh the greal amount of vol- unleuv organization that heis grown up n the American scene. Although recog- izing the abuses to which organizations "iieiiines lend themselves, he views ihis evelopmenl as a rather goo,I thing. I lial America has developed a new on of economic and social system thai £ovides a full answer to nineteenth entury Marxisl criticisms is a central "nil enhanced by the author. What we have achieved i- the far referable alternative to Marxisl colectivism on the one hand or cartels on oilier. It is ei voluntary private ptern of cooperation, and il enters the v'-s and experience of ever) business- an, every professional man. everv en rpnser, .verv scholar, every engineer, "•'iv natural scientist. . . . In short, American experience like "hat of our mosl advanced friends has at inid-century produced a kin,I of so- =i*'ly lhal not onlv ba- solved eill the the subsiJf. 'e'ns against which Karl Marx in- ,,.,, r-SrT'T, a ''''"U"'>' a?"' lml mosl of "ie 1 '" problems lhal faced us a half century protection a« ago. and many of the problems that government" aisled e, quarter century ago." uA/J/' ,9anham is :l staunch supporter riimeut can l'e (5.' '"'' I nited Nalions. To this organiza- reight rales l"rr,on 'i<* would assign a most ambitious [ it can be viQrofra™ "I technical assistance to the mini iii,h.-i'^;;:';jAz]"]n::!.^r "[the »«*>■ »e npetitio lout ■em even 5ii;i! banking op*] .-ni can I"' "' rments of "Ur ;ove« ',.11 <*ws this sort of endeavor, ali , '"iK a continuing function of our gov- sees greal opportunit) for people's ibilize at rici slipp, justili rnnii'iit. If pate work along these lines, but gov tnment seems i„ ,.„„„. grst. -u ,p,,-1,._ °"'- wc lake sleps to supplement vvhat- PVer governmenial I hrship can do. »'"' a wide range of private activit) r""' will open the r" iral agreeme ■ level of (Continued f„r T'' will open the channels down which le gofl'^^ivuig ideas llow." t Hut. it seems, governmenl must do the ger pari. The theme is nol the libertar- » erg ... C-'\, Consult your bookstore for hooks reviewed here — or write to pub* Ushers listed. ian one thai freedom musl come firsl individual freedom withoul governmenl planning and governmenl intervention in the market place. The author urges free trade, and this is certainly requisite for the expanded free market which musl be a condition of economic freedom lor the individual on a world-wide scale. Bul tariffs are lml one of the means ol governmental intervention in the affairs of the individual and of the market place. Aggression and fraud militate againsl the Free market and against the individual's righl of freedom. A monopot) of force is given to governmenl to prevent these wrongs, Iiiii this is negative intervention on the pari of government, ll is characterized in our Declaration of Independence by the words, "to secure these rights." Bul when governmenl moves over to the side of using ils monopoly of force for the purpose of positive intervention in the affairs of individuals and of the market place, we have a new sel of commandments a set of "thou shah's." Ideally, governmenl should enforce a sel of "thou shall notV and thus leave the widest possible freedom of individual choice to be reflected and recorded in the free market. The author does nol lake il in this undiluted form; he prefers a middle wav. similar to that which has come to be known as the '"mixed economy." Some hold lhal the mixed economy is an unstable sort of thing that, if persisted iu. it will lead gradually into some form of Socialist system. That does seem to be historically tenable, hut perhaps we can be the exception. At this writing we stand a good chance of finding out. Of considerable value are Mr. Can- hams observations of the changes thai have taken place in American business. Many good points are set forth indicating thc degree lo which business has shown great concern for the welfare of employees and community a concern that has heen definitely "good business." Here the title, Sew Frontiers i<>r freedom, seems musl applicable. The author appear- to he on more consistent ground when discussing American business than when he is contemplating function-- of government. Going beyond mere support of the United Nations. Mr. Canham advocates some form of international federalism. Ih- is nol specific as to which of the many prevalent plans he prefers, hut it seems probable lhat he is considering ls Forum News, January, 1956 something like .Atlantic Union on the NATO foundation, perhaps as a nucleus for world federalism whenever that seems possible. In proposing some sort of international federalism he take- a novel approach to the question of nationalism. In so dniug he departs from the I NESCO pastime of clobbering the poor old beast al ever) turn of the page. Instead, the author sees nationalism as a tool—if properly used to bring aboul international federalism. It is an interesting approach. "Latterly nationalism has been out of fashion. And so it should be if it were nol linked with the fact of interdepend rnri . Nationalism without the leaven of interdependence becomes in tenia tional anarchy, Bul nationalism expressed with an awareness ol national and individual interdependence becomes community. We should USe the loree of nationalism to help liberate the world the force of nationalism sel in lhe new framework of growing regional federalism and world organization. ". . . There is a place and always will I.e. in our integrating world, for a true sense of nationhood, just as there is a place for the proud California!! or the exuberant Texan or the canny New !■.inlander in our own nation. . . . To attack nationalism is no wav lo lead human thinking toward cooperation. To use it as a vital mean- of social and political organization of interdependence will help remove main misconceptions among those who understandably fear lhe loss of precious values and safeguard-."' A- do so many proponents of federalism, Mr. Canham avoids mention of the fact that most nalions brought into such an international government would he Socialist nation-. On the [--ne of free enterprise versus socialism we would be simplv outvoted, jusl as we have heen in the ILO and many other international organizations. In facl. we outvoted ourselves three-to-one on the 1952 Socialized Medicine Convention of the ILO. wilh both l'. S. government delegates and the labor delegate voting lor the thing. Tlie Convention is not law in lhe I nited Slales because it has not heen ratified hv the Senate. Hut it might well he lhe sort of thing to he enacted hy lhe parliament of a regional federal government, lhe governments of most of lhe prospective members have already instituted variations on the same theme. If the Jeremiad- of John T. Flynn seem unduly pessimistic, Air. Canham tends toward "'peace, peace" hv giving slight attention to current conditions and problems which eventually will call for solution rather than ignoring. He faces up to the facl lhal we cannot go on forever generating employment and prosperity w Ith armament production. In a paraphrase of one of President Roosevelt's later - to - he - ignored pronouncement.-. Air. Canham says, "Pros- Page 49 1 v / Jews, Januid
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