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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956
File 050
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956 - File 050. 1956-01. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 8, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/209/show/189.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-01). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956 - File 050. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/209/show/189

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956 - File 050, 1956-01, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 8, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/209/show/189.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. V, No. 1, January 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date January 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 050
Transcript for this important work. However, with the cost-price squeeze on in agriculture, it is more necessary than ever before that we bring to fanners the ver) best information on ways and means oi cutting costs. This means that 1956 is no time to stop the accelerated program now under way. I -hall be interested in the budget recommendations of the Administration in this field. In the effort to balance the federal budget. I hope that important programs like adequate research and education will not be victim of election year political expediency. To me nothing is more vital to a lasting solution of our farm problems than continued emphasis on research and extension. The route to newspaper headlines and publicity is to be for or against 90 per cent price supports. The route of E service tei farmers is to be for increasing appropriations J our federal budgets for the expansion of research and etlu<1 tion in American agriculture. . . . The farm problem has been with us for most of this gen*] aliieii. The next generation will have to endure it onlv a li'" while until we,ilel population catches up. That's why I li"f ■■■■ that those people vvllee eire sincerely the friends ,,f the \nli*' can fanner mav quit fighting each cither and join on a pf grain that will clean the commodity shelves, that will bri" to the American farmer an alert, active and aggressive nieit^'veM for his produce, and will eit the same time give truth at 's65B£ifj! le, our slogan that f I may have a voice in the final p"2-25. iioiincement of peace. k*rv Christ Senator Gore favors 90% Price Supports With Control' the liir the pr THERE MIT. THOSE who sav that the present price- squeeze difficulty would straighten itself out if the government would merely step completely out of the picture and allow the law ol "suppl) anil demand to operate freely. This sounds good ei- an eaomeenie theeirv. hut even if it worked, which 1 doubt, the small family-size producer vvouhl I,,- crushed to death in the process, lhe trend toward large corporate-type [arming would be greatly accelerated. The manufacturer of automobiles can ail just his production to the number of cars he will sell at a price which will give him a profit. If there are too many automobiles, he simplv shut- down a part ol his plant until the supplv is "adjusted." On the other hand, a feirnier cannot simply stop producing (unless, of cur-.', he goes broke and is forced to go out of business). Then, ton. the farmer, unaided, has no control over the price he receives. Winn a steer is fat he has to go tei the market at whatever price tin- buyer i- willing to pav. The farmer who rebels onl) compounds hi- losses if he continues to feed the steer, hoping for a better price. There is a second major reason why the law of supply ami demand doe- not eelwavs vvi.rk feer the fanner like it does for other folk-. Generally speaking, if there is an over-supply of some product, the price will go down, bringing about increased consumption and. ultimately, increased demand. But. for some strange reason, ihi- principle doesn t seem to work for the farmer. Though the price he receives declines, the piiea- at the grocery store does not. For example, lower prices for wheat have' not meant lower prices of bread. On the con- trary, while wheat t,...k ei nosedive, bread made- a vertical take-off. In 1947 wheat s.elel for $2.35 per bushel and bread wa- 12'j cents per II,. During thc Erst ten months oi 1955 wheat has averaged s2.nl per bushel while bread was sold for 17.7 cents per pound. Vnd, there is another statistical lent that weenies me. In the three-year period 1947-49, the fanner received 19 per cent of the retail price of bread. That was ei smeill share, indeed. lint in .lulv. "tugust ami September of 1955 he received onl) I I per cent. Let us take a look at beef. In the 1947-49 period the farmers' share nl the consumers' beef dollar was 71 per cent. In the third quarter of 1955 his share' was onl) (•! per cent. In the same periods, tin' farmers -hen,' e.l llu- consumers' p'.rk dollar dropped In,in 67 per cent I,, 52 per cent. In I'lUi the farmers' -hare' ,,! the food eleilleir wa- ."id cents. In 1953 it weis 49 cents. \t iln' presenl time, iln- farmers share is running at the rate of 40 cents. . . . There are a great man) people win. regard our whole' [arm pn,mam as either unjustified subsidy or political pap. These "In bat c Sen. Albert Gore (D—Tenn.) at mi •ictv seinii' people seem nol at all disturbed about lhe sub">°^"'! industry from protective land-. Thev seem eve-n less r- j1 cerned with the' economic supports and protection '•''"ago business and industry hv a plethora of government'*' ^xisle main-, policies eunl regulator) agencies. . . . Mr, Now, if the power of the people's government can b^f the I., regulate competition and li\ profitable freight rates f"1 '"" I roads, trucks, busses and airplanes if it can he u9*r°"r, control, ami sometimes prevent, competiti I industry J1*'1" imports, if il can be used to limil competition, ,-ll*'r!nc'^ profits and make for -..und and profitable banking °Perjirnm il the powet of the people's government can he' "' Jrival stabilize and support all other major segments of „'>' Isrnmi '.mv. then I -en the power of the same people's gov'"'"Jore. can justifiably be ti-< <l to support and stabilize agricull^Ver the most basic industry of all. ■*"'■ Despite the dissenters, I believe price support f"r ^., ".' commodities is now generally accepted as justifiable ?". ,,"' mental policy. Hen-, however, the general agri-emeu'wr There are sharp disagreements as to the level of fa"*1' (Continued e VI | Page 48 I've is Kniii vi News, Jttmtti nil
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