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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956
File 049
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956 - File 049. 1956-01. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 5, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/209/show/188.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-01). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956 - File 049. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/209/show/188

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956 - File 049, 1956-01, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 5, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/209/show/188.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. V, No. 1, January 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date January 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 049
Transcript Bur.au F«*.r*J rganization's " si ,600,000. M the fourth aen«" 1853. .rge't have Id ever support upporls begsj i \\ I surpluses, vv 191!'.. 1 belief 1", billion 'I"1; quieklv liqufl „liiv Credil >■ jor portion " v Credil stocj had their ell."" illl-es. If 1 ,-ts a chaif l, pi If you will look at the chart and realize that if farm income had moved in normal relationship to national income as it mounted up to .'500 billions of dollars, farm net income would now he at about 27 billion dollars — yet the latest government publication puts it at the rate of 10.6 billion dollars. This is the farm problem, lt is not important that we wast it energies in farm meetings debating whether we go back to the 90 per cent supports which carried us from high farm prosperity and comparable high net farm income to the low figure of the I2..'i billions for 1051. or whether we should ti v flexible price supports or two price systems or export subsidies. Ihe question is: What do we do now and do quickly lo put the farmer in a safe spot economically and in a proper financial relationship to the businessmen, the doctors, lawyers and engineers who live in the cities that our farm produce feeds ? ... I am going to try to answer my own question as to what we do now. ... I could go [through all the] basic and non-basic commodities tracing the . . . pattern of accumulation [of surpluses] and price deterioration, but I have promised that I would try to make a suggestion of what might be done. BIPARTISAN COOPERATION NEEDED One of our national news magazines (V. S. News & World Report, September 30, 10.511 had an article entitled "Wanted: Magic Formula for the Farm Problem. After 35 years of Search No Really New Ideas." I agree with that heading. There is no device that we can hastily concoct to cure our ills, no magic wand that we can wave to make them disappear. There is, however, hard work to be clone . . . First, I think we need to quiet the fighting on several farm fronts. By that I mean that vve must soem he able to bring all farm organizations to a common position in behalf of the farmer. We must try to find a program that can be acceptable I" both political parties. Republican and Democratic, and thai un,his lhe individuals within each party. . . . We need to find a basis for prompt action that can halt the decline in fain, income. That basis must be able to enlist llie On percenters ... as well as Senators who believe in flexible price supports ... I don't care how few things wc agree we ipports a c ■ ' -ii - *—* = ***"• "- B- B*~- e-xtiei busl"] "" a' 'l,sl "i how simple lhe early areas ol agreement are, w< j 20 ml ' d to take the farm program out of perpetual political strife. II ill of ^ !" substitute the bipartisan approach to farm problems which characterized the years when prosperity was being restored "ii lhe American farm. . . . n problem '" id-••><»« mrs >;iul income tic a i hart i ee att»» cond 'I": MUST DISPOSE OF PRESENT SURPLUSES Second, we must clean the shelves of the Commodity Credit Corporation. I mean we must dispose of our surpluses. No program — rigid 90 per cent supports, flexible prie the secml ' . ay." Thai i»J heul is prep*l cjiarlnient '» 1 price p|ans _ wi|, ^^ ^.^ ^ sur])iuses we n, ' '"■'■" -'.'.'J J hand. We should not fool the American farmer by •st.mates ' j that we think they will. to! ' -uppoils. soil fertility banks, production payments or two- .. ,ie* 1 — will work with the' siiiohises vve now have em i pretending I \'$ ^e must clean our shelves if we expect to see the line y representing farm net income turn upward and if we expect I to see national income stay high. Economically, this nation would he in a far sounder peisilion if vve gave away about six 1 billions dollars worth of food and fiber than it will be if we "" '■" ... „< '"ulinue to keep these stocks hanging over everv commodity "".ji market. At the end of World War II we clumped enorm,,iis lands around the Pacific, and while I mmodity stocks now, I do advo- , ,\v estimate I sa eit the rate ihollt I0:, J ent ii)' pa-l " [uantities of food on •nl up past -n do not advocate dumping co ,,f the |„'."'' eate gelling rid of them <*|!'*,'t liad ' When I took the oath ol office as Secretary of Agriculture. I had to sign a receipt for 7'/i million bales of cotton. It was Facts Forum News, January, 1956 sorry cotton at that, but as long as il was hanging over the market there wasn't much traele in farm-produced cotton. We moved it all in a year or a year and a half and the day we decided to move it outside of normal American traele z s. the cotton market stiffened and cotton prices went up and stayed up until cotton got it in a surplus situation again, f tell you, we can still move cotton when we want to. A program to move these commodities may involve putting great quantities in tbe hands of people in other lands who could not otherwise afford lo buy them. What is wrong with that? Our slogan in World War II proclaimed that food would win the war and write the peace. Well, it won tlle war all right. Why not let it try to write the peace? These billions in food and fiber could implement our foreign policy far better than supplying arms to the .Arabs or to the Israeli. Shooting irons placed in the hands of trigger-happy people lead to war but food and fiber can lead to peace. Food and filler can help carry the spirit of Geneva at a time when that spirit seems to he mighty weak and when the foreign ministers find little on which to agree. When food and fiber lie in bins and pile up the storage, the accumulation onlv breaks our farmers. If thev arc sent abroad and remove-el from our economy, farm income will spurt upward, national income will slay at high levels, and in a few years we- will have forgotten the cost of such a disposal program just as vve forgot tin- cost of letting thousands of tanks, planes and guns be captured by "General Rust" after World War II. We will have forgotten, but the heart of the world will not and it well might be that we would have created an atmosphere where the spirit of Geneva, the blessings of the atomic power and a host of other favoring circumstances might begin tee work toward the achievement of peace. MORE AGRICULTURAL RESEARCH NEEDED Third, we must spend more on research and extension lo build wider markets al home and abroad. As I reflect on mv years in tin' Department of Agriculture, I have many memories. Some relate to the problems of food rationing, shortages of essential supplies to farmers, reorganization of lhe Department to increase the emphasis on marketing: however, none is so satisfying as the fact that during this period the Research and Marketing Act ol 1910 weis enacted into law and a program for accentuating research in agriculture was set in motion. For far too long we- have been neglecting agricultural research and the task ol bringing the results of research to farmers mi the land. I regret that in the years immediately after 1910 wc weren I able to get the program in "high gear" to the extent tbat should have heen done. Therefore, il was gratifying to me that in the 1952 platforms of both political parties, there was a firm commitment lo expand agricultural research. The Democratic party platform pledged expanded research. We are justly proud ..I the outstanding achievements of our agricultural research. We' favor ei greatly expanded research eenel I'lhleeelieen program leer Vmerican agriculture ill eeiate'i lleeet both production anel distribution may more effectively serve consumers anel producers eelikea ami thus meel 11■«- needs e.f the miiele-131 .Mill.I. we favor especial e-eeipliei-i- on tin- developmenl eif new crops eenel veeiilie-s. on crop einel livestock disease einel la-i control, eunl mi agricultural statistics emd marketing -civile--. The Republican platform made a like promise. We- recommend expanded agricultural research anil education te. promote new crops eunl uses, ne'e, markets, lieetli feere-ifin em,I domestic, more trustworthy crop eunl inarke-t estimates, a realistic trade program for agriculture aimed eet restoring foreign markets eunl developing neve neiile-is eit home. Progress has been made in getting more adequate funds Page 47 K •vvs. JlllllltlflJ'\
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