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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956
File 047
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956 - File 047. 1956-01. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/209/show/186.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-01). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956 - File 047. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/209/show/186

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956 - File 047, 1956-01, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/209/show/186.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. V, No. 1, January 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date January 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 047
Transcript eea new approach X to the FARM PROBLEM? Presented here are excerpts from an address of Senator Clinton P. Anderson (D—N. ML) before the Texas Farm ' Bureau annual convention, November «, 1955. Senator Anderson, who is Chairman of the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy and was U. S. Secretary of Agriculture 1945- t«. is eminently qualified to discuss agricultural problems and to offer — as he does lure — a new approach to their solution. Following his speech arc excerpts from an address given "fore the same convention by Senator Albert Gore (D-Tenn.) who ,g |n general agreement with Senator Anderson, but expresses a different view in regard to price supports. Sen. Clinton P. Anderson (D—N. Mexico) against the output of other segments '"rm production tha eihil-h- piece of] "f';■'■■ '■<' v. arnicr could "" , 1,le Congress tried to recognize that situation. It passed ,"l<l '"' sold J'|lii!,'M ■?ISl:"i"" promising the farmer that he would ' la"(i J","l"''1|«il'U " i "gld P1'Ce 8uPPorts as "■' incentive to production $.-,00, and in!' "'"" lhe Peri°d of the war, and that in recognition and ,u»ht and soWJ . ard lor hls stimulated and expanded production under 'lal'lilf i» ur iaft"e '',""l''"ls <luri"f; the »"'■ te would have two full years "■ the war during which the government of the United UD WAR "'"'« would guarantee him adequate prices for his enlarged '"in" The nn'1'! ,.cl"f-"*.Durl"g th<*s<* two years, of course, he was expected "■lines of »"f8'leve| JU j Producti°n* '» shrink it back to more normal fill-'1'; ;,„.,, a'Kl ,'" l>n'Pare °"<l* again lor the period when farm ;iiark,., „iJ,'"""K a',d "a"onaI income might move along together. ^ u|„; M.m I an, speaking of things that are within the orbit of . ..,".'*■ own acquaintance, because I came into the Department of ver after iKr" < ac,Iua"""'"''- because 1 came into the Depart two v.-ir- d"" the r 'ar> "f Vulture] midwav between the emli, t ' «vc 0f?tl.e European and Japanese phases of World War II. ■ IllVVII ie strength, I eunl torn. V SURPLUSES UNLOADED '■ou see next on the chart a rapid lift in the relationship of J* '" '"«)ine to national income, because we moved e.s rapidly years la rn* ,a> we could to eliminate price controls from the farm com- , 'it oXZ, , '" fiive ""■"' :' chance <" "■"'ll *** "'""' formal night call P»,f< hilionsl,,,! ,„ fa,,„ ;,„.„„„, ,(ut there were ^^ ^^ ^ 11, hut .1 can mangmg the far,,, price horizon. We had on hand 71.', mil , I in I'M.',. I "''I, .- elTectivcly Wacts Forum Nevvs, January, 1956 i US. JtllllllU' hales of rag tag cotton — cheap cotton that had moved under the government loan at standard prices hut had been of such inferior quality that it had not heen taken out of warehouses for manufacturing into textiles. We had e mous stockpiles of butter, wool, cheese, dried skim milk powder, and a host of other things. We had thousands of cases of canned vegetables, millions of pounds of canned meats. The problem then land perhaps the problem now I was to move those commodities into markets other than the normal market of the American fanner. It is unnecessary to detail those now: but the surplus cotton, for example, went to China. Japan. Austria and Germany in a fashion that did not interfere with the normal exports of American cotton to England, Belgium, Italy and other large buyers. In 1945, l'J46 and 1947, the release of these enormous stocks of surplus com- nioelilie-s eliel not drive down domestic agricultural prices because there was a world demand for our goods and we could find places to put away our food and fiber without disturbance of the normal .American channels of domestic and international agricultural trade. The separation of farm income from national income began in the vear 1948 eis vou can see from the chart. Agricultural prices began to drop because agricultural production held up even after markets began to disappear. The people of Europe and Asia began to reestablish their wheat fields and their rice paddies. The rehabilitation work of I NRRA and Page 45 f
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