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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956
File 043
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956 - File 043. 1956-01. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 18, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/209/show/182.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-01). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956 - File 043. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/209/show/182

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956 - File 043, 1956-01, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 18, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/209/show/182.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. V, No. 1, January 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date January 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 043
Transcript effect on the f this article. itive unless it * ,,. Constitutioiij veral states m amendment to i repealed. portation into I [ States for del of th* I,,latin less il * ■alive unl the Constitutij ded in the C'"'; I,, submission m more than I.i percentage points higher than the bottom rate. Out of more than $60 billion collected in federal tax revenues at present, only $2.4 billion comes from indiv idual income taxes in excess of the 25 per cent rate. The power to impose death and gift taxes would be removed from Congress by this amendment, which would allow the states to use these sources of revenue. Only 1 per cent of the total federal budget is derived I loin these taxes. All amendments to the Constitution except the Sixteenth Amendment arc designed to restrict and tic down the federal government rather than enlarge its powers. Our forefathers, in setting up the Constitution, placed a limitation on the taxing power of the federal government in order that the individual might remain free. Thomas Jefferson expressed their philosophy when he said: "Do not talk to me about the integrity of public officials. I say: chain lhe politicians to the limitations of the Constitution itself." THE BYRD-BRIDGES AMENDMENT would require that federal taxes equivalent in amount to appropriations be imposed by Congress except in time of declared war, e or when the I nited Stale'- i- engaged in open hostility against an external enemy. This amendment would outlaw the unbalanced budget which is the cause of inflation, and make illegal the passing on to future generations of bills for present-da) spending. THE BRICKER AMENDMENT would prevent treaties or other international agreements which conflict with any provision of the Constitution from hav ing any force or effect. Unless implemented by appropriate legislation, a treat) or other international agreement could not become a part of our internal law. During the past few years "treaty law"' has become more powerful clue to changes in judicial interpretation and new concepts concerning international affairs. Many people feel that the continued supremacy of "treaty law" endangers the liberties of the American people and the constitutional form of government, THE REED-WALTER AMENDMENT would permit three-fourths of the state legislatures, through proposal and ratification, to amend the Constitution entirely bv their own actions. I to the office ,n who ha- b4 , for more tha" hi was ele ted I lent more than' ,„, holding th*"! .,.,1 lev 111,' l'""? !„■ hold'* If an informed public feels that these amendments are necessary for the preservation of our Constitution, it can help to create the demand for this action. SEND COPIES TO YOUR FRIENDS - Booklet reprints of the Constitution ore 15 cents each; St 4.50 per hundred; $70.00 per five hundred; $130.00 per thousand. Reprints of any article appearing in facts Forum News may be obtained on request. Prices vary according to length of the article and quantities ordered. "■B ma) , •nt. during I'1 ive from he hiring ll"' i'"' ..' Soviet Peace Offensive (Continued from Page 31) ll -telle- we to the -teltc- itii-l infiltration of Formosa, because lhe native unless i Heels can no longer find collaborators. e Constitution "j Reports from refugees and defectors, thin ?,lho determinedly make their vveiy lo Ml ormosa. indicate thai there is no organized anti-Communist resistance on tin- mainland, hut that strong anti-Corn- rnunist guerilla bauds exist, especially in \nrili China. Constant rebellions are reported, and widespread dissatisfaction on iuch discusse" nt, The Reed' • Amendment' below, woul"1 lh throughout lied China. It is confidently Iffirmed that the Chinese people will bally around ('.luting Kai-shek, lb- hae- become the known and accepted symbol of freedom from communism. He represents the only organized force againsl llids. and has a long-established record of fighting them. Ihe second strongest point of anti- Communist resistance ill Asia is South Korea, valiantly defiant of threatened J (aC'immiinisI mililarv aggression. Third is (no"»»f,/7i Civilian,, where Premier Diem is ^^njfh'-perately trying lo consolidate his al "' ""''.,, rn,,- einel prepare the Vietnamese for ratio to Hid lemocratic government. i.eieil system "j ASIATIC COUNTRIES COOPERATE mid provide ' As firsthand reports from fellow- „■ taxes. \ hi^'x-ians spread the truth about commu- roved l.v thr'''' J'-'"- patriotic leaders throughout -I i- hiiwcvt'r''""'hi'ast Asia arc realizing their im- es in nations ider this me it case, h"»' the t..p in"' ''*' \ivvs. JanuA inbuilt peril and lhe urgency of uniting in a desperate efforl lo resisl Communisl encroachment. The governments of Ceylon. Thailand, and Pakistan an- definitely anti-Communist. Even in Burma, Malaya, and Indonesia, courageous anti- Communisl leaders arc rising. Mohammed \titsir. leeulcr of the Moslem party in Indonesia, is seiid to bene the strongest anti-Communist organization in Southeast I sin. As a group, the Moslems constitute the most aggressive force againsl communism in both the \cur and Far Cast, lu India, the anti-Corn- muni.-l movement is small lint verv active. The Philippines, of course, remains iln- outpost of free democracy in Asia. Delegate'- from ni'"' \-ialic peoples Turkey. Pakistan, Burma, Japan, the Philippines, South \ ietnam. Hong Kong, anil Okinawa me) i" an informal five- week conference on Formosa, May 25 lo .lane 30, 1955, feir the purpose of expanding the organization of the Asiatic /'copies' Anti-Communist League, initiated hv South Korea in May. 1951. Information and experiences were exchanged, and plans formulated for a ro- ordinated campaign eigeiinst communism. Significantly, Pr. V. D. Poremshy, president of NTS. and Andrei SveUanin, NTS Far Eastern expert, were invited lo attend the conference as representatives of ihe Russian people. Their reception in this capacity hv the Free Chinese governmenl constitutes the first official en I -if llii.- kind. Plans for coordination of the Liberation Movements in Europe and Asia were discussed, and active coordination initiated in the political warfare campaigns of Free China and the Russian Liberation Movement through NTS. This latter action was the most hopeful note in lhe informal Formosa conference. In the formidable task facing anti-Communist Asiatic liberation leaders, the strong support of the ll est is desperately needed, ll was made clear, however, that this support must he given on the basis of an equal alliance. There niii-l he full recognition of the sovereign an.l independent status of the indigenous anti-Communist forces whether these be the recognized government or (in Communist-dominated countries) its bonafide opposition. The fallacies of Western policy were discussed as tragic fails, without rancor. Discouraging as the presenl prospect is. Asiatic anti-Communist leaders still have hope that ih.' West, especially the United States, nill take a firm stand in defense of human rights before il is too late. END We regret thai Decernh,-I- Issue Admiral Hen M Road to Power Atomic Sett nti* croft'e speech, ' Eneri ERRATA credit was oot driven t,. The Freeman for tree l*a artic <■. "The '; also to Tin /lull t for its.* of Sir Johr Th<- Future Use* of in use I'o Hit Co iur of <'/ ck- M TS Fobtjm NEWS, January, 1956 Page 41 ng r
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