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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956
File 020
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956 - File 020. 1956-01. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 11, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/209/show/159.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-01). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956 - File 020. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/209/show/159

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956 - File 020, 1956-01, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 11, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/209/show/159.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. V, No. 1, January 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date January 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 020
Transcript SOCIAL SECURITY (Continued) the worker. There is nothing to guarantee- control over that agency to employees. It may also be controlled by employers. In other words, giving the government control over industrial relations creates a fulcrum which means great power for an unknown user. I be introduction of compulsory social insurance in cases of sickness, or eom- pulsory seeeieil insurance in cases of unemployment, means that the workers must be subject to examinations, investigations, regulations, and limitations. Their activities must be regulated in accordance with tbe standards se-t bv governmental agencies. To that we -ball not stand idly hy and give our assent. Wen and women, I trust I may mil be sounding mv warnings upon tin- empty air. I hope that they may find a lodgment in the minds anil the hearts of my countrymen. I bid you have a care in all these attempts lo regulate the personal relations and the normal personal activities of the- citizenship of our country ere it be too late. There is in the minds of many an absence of understanding of tbe fundamental essentials of freedom. They talk Freedom, and yet would have bound upon their wrists tbe gyves tbat would lie them to everlasting bondage. And no matter how sympathetic or humanitarian is tbe gloss over tbe plan and tbe scheme, I again bid vou beware. Wc know not when or how this great strug- L'le- going on in F.urope will terminate, or what il shall mean for the future of Congressmen W. R. Poage (D) and Bruce Alger (R), both of Texas, expressed their views regarding Social Security on a recent Faets Forum program. Congressman Poage, who feels that Social Security is "safe and sound," speaks first: those countries; but at least W ■ . people- of tin- United States hoi'' 1-1 • • e - I i r 3111.' i liberties in their own hands, lor II ,- come lo pass tbat our Ann ii'3 . i tales institutions anil ' America whose we so much revere, may the ol id in relighta >u ii ilie- corr heart Hume i,l -,, aloft, and thus torch, rekindlin world's liberty. For a mess of pottage, under th1 tense of compulsory soeieil insU' *"* let us not voluntarily surrender th**"ri'ri damental principles of liberty anfcnkr dorn. the hope- of the Republic te -.;i United Stales, the leader and teafl the world of the signifiram greal anthem chorus of luiin-11 liberty! I\ I. BEEN requested lo outline briefly my views em our Sen ieil Si < ill it V system. I look on Soeieil Security eis one of the great forward steps of our generation. It is not perfect. It is nol complete. It has defects. Some- ol these arc defects of organization and administration. These ' em eunl should be corrected. It is admittedly siibjta-t tee some fundamental objections. Here the question is: Can you olTer any better system to cure even more fundamental evils of our economic system? We musl balance the good against the bad. I ibink the balance weighs heavily in favor of Social Security. Well, what is this Social Security system? It is our entire blended pro- gram of self-help, employer assistance anil government eiiel directed to the- e.b- jea-tiw eef minimizing economic dependence of the aged, the crippled and the helpless. It is basically insurance instead of charity. Insurance- is just as American as ham and eggs. It is the invention of capitalism. Insurance is neither foreign nor socialistic, lln the contrary, as I see it. our besl hope againsl communism is the creation of a fnni economy bused on the savings of the people during their productive years with the assurance- that whin that productivity is lost, through no fault of their own. that they can -till hope- to enjoy u reasonable buying power, Basically, that is exactly what Social Security provides. How does it do it V For those who are already too old to Page 18 build up a retirement fund out of earnings, it provides old age assistance based on need. That this phase i- inadequate and that it is oftlimes inaptly administered, is freely admitted. Bul il is far better than the complete dependence on the charitably inclined individuals and organizations of ;i generation ago. Nor is old age assistance planned as a permanent part eef the- Soeieil Security program. For those who, due to special circumstances like blindness, widowhood, infancy, and for crippled children, there are special grunts--again inadequate bul ol tremendous help. A- I see ii the real (unction of Social Security rests on the Old \ge and Survivor- Insurance. Gradually each person in the 1 nited States will be required I" deposit ei fixed per cenl of his earnings with the system us premium payments on a poliev of insurance which will pro- vide payments to him during his old eige- en to hi- Burvivors. His employer will be- required to make ;i contribution lo lhe same fund. The rates musl of course be actuarially sound, just as they niii-t In- for a private insurance com- peinv. These rales must in like manner In- -ee adjusted ;i- to cover adequately the- ri-ks involved. There is one substantial risk which I feel should he more adequately covered theit is the ri>k of loss of earning power due' to disability. I think these rules should be high ei gh to ee,ve-i every case- of total disability eit whatever eine incurred. The only reason for I ■*• In paying benefits eil age 65 i- lliul the experience of munkind ' vo(p dicated thai most people ein- ,|,| |, somewhat iliseil.le-el when thev re* lltl| ( age. I think that the young n'J',| s,., loses hi- arms or suffers some " Tolhal capacity eil age 25 or '55 should C, u the same type- eef aid. Surely h even iii.en- desperately than lheats ■ mun. us In- will more often li-|V'iilii-,| family obligations, cion« The House of lie-pn--,-nielli'1 | |(, recently passed legislation exli coverage if the insured partv is ■> i- ,., or older. I would put no ei?eople Surely such a program woul" t ,, man; people lo pick and lo own doctor, who are now forci'» innia the socialized program of -'''el wi ganized charity, ll will be a sti ;ig;iin-t socialized medicine ein1'' I- || demands lor other lypes of ~'" I lea service. I be Anil what of tin- coverage "'lie- , Security? There are those- vvl'-'eeii e il because liny sav il docs n<*l| mai enough. Congress has ulwa slowly because we wanted the -s eiel ,, be -eeiiiiel. Bul it does not in*1 "thiilv dollarevery-Thursday' ' "- "■ (In the other band there eire' ihf.lion complain thai the system shoid0. il c, tiiclv voluntary. That woulel ll.n- except thai llie- very people wb" inn-i most would, generally sprakiwti-i-s. no payments and would still 1"' Ih'- of charily or of direcl govcrim"'" * "ee ance. U 13 Facts Forum News, JaniK'^m
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