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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956
File 007
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956 - File 007. 1956-01. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 13, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/209/show/146.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-01). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956 - File 007. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/209/show/146

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956 - File 007, 1956-01, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 13, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/209/show/146.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. V, No. 1, January 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date January 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 007
Transcript r restrict such in'lt certainl) lommittee propofhonest. mil hills presented in this session at noon and theItfredsi were passed- and votes were the morning, at |n .„,„,. | am sure, who couldn't he Mouse, a 111% laki-ii lime' to sti.il> the hearings leaving the door. uummittee reports. I., have a quic.kjrt.a--ze(j ||Kll [ecleral governmenl has ■oom. just oil thehine see hig that many people with real fancied federal needs are keeping he Washington -r congressmen busy doing various ■ssini'ii receive i'"ri-s and the main event, the legisla- lirl" at will. WeW itself, is not getting the necessary s I to "representation ,,[ il„. congressmen. 30? Soon this pro 1 realized I coj BAS|C honesty APPLIES it both ends, hvei ie to studv and Another surprise awaited me when I fe went out oiilyjned that seeinc men would not or a part of tbe gathjld not, for reasons best known to 11. veite their convictions. This I do E'S CONVICTION full) understand and in any event not subscribe to. On the other hand. sin in national larned to in\ satisfaction that a man ne in the de-bat* [,c honest, contrary to all tbe ac- I trade. In broad nts. innuendos. eunl outright distor- h the' President sSs which I had read in tlle past about ie. However, I Sjernment corruption. I mu convinced my Districl e'H':ieen is what he is. regardless 'if wheth- ireign oil eunl I "•be- is in government or business and he should, can, and must pre>p<" this hill, which 'Chen' arc those who say, and believe, mcnls to the me'- understand their direct advice, that ,roinii of congri^iuiii cannot vote his convictions and I in open debate Ire-elected le> Congress. Some well-in- ti 'd members have said this to me. li/,.,1 Heal linneln'is I contest ei~ wrong in fact, but after wanted I" ann'n ' m a newcomer and. as some say, e.son for the ruWt em '"unfortunate interlude," — a \aiit to Mile- for like. It remains to he seen whether thc fails cone**'"' discover the answer to the "vote rills would have <tor convictions anil he re-elected" ies. Neither eli'l Imposition which is thc onlv basis on ill bv addin" hu"''1 '' I care to he e. congressman, iidments. realizinPaving sold my business before going inics and our de'W .ishingt 1 >n. I found that most others lu with it. as paf,l businesses or partners, ami win. eun not quickl) ''''".- '"sts in Washington arc high, |l [hat the "peril Bj I soon lear I thai the' necessit) for ise-" provisions sjiutaining two homes added to the 'lil- he protect those ^ ''' v ol ineiking heilh ends meet. Willi luinely threatene'ty"''1) Hash e.f intuition, I hail told Dal- 11111:1 where 1 fai'f"'lrs lhat when they visited me in al and local inte'ifl~'1"|gt,"i il would be "Dutch." A ;,, meanin„ ,,( "V'sl satisfactory arrangement. " l»l\ abiding belie! has been substan- hal I learned llie''''.'''1 I,N l'"s llrsl lrr"i 'hat "the best eleleem clear-cut- fl"''cs 's "" politics"' in the conducl ol ,,,. .,|| had bM '"''■ '"• '" sav '' another way, the 11 it's :, shaele- of £' politics is to hi' the very hesl con- ■i'u either extren**r M"a" possible. This is in contrast to nplicali'd eunl ill1''' "P"l'''<*all) expedient" advice tradi- I ipiiekb when p*£ldllV.£'*•'<••* t<> some, lhal Part) come I've heard jestingly useel to explain one's vote againsl his own convictions: "\\ ell. sometimes a man must rise above principle-." It occurs to me in retrospect that there is a lack of "self-discipline in Congress — that to win re-election, politicall) expedient "yesses" are given sometimes to pressure' groups b) men lae king the courage to s;e\ "no." In monetar) matters, the lack of self-discipline is most evident in Congress. Per- hei|is ei geieed example is our feiilure to curtail appropriations in line with federal income'. \\ In is there deficit financing? lt jusl isn't necessary. "PURE" POLITICS Pure politics appeared on the scene Ii3'(|iie'iill\. 110 iloiiht more than a newcomer readily recognized — hut some I saw. Frequently, digs were taken at each other hs old-timers with treasured grievances and pet peeves — and valuable debate time weis |M-t in charge and coun- hoth sides ..'■' ~' ' el' tl mhi must get lien to 'theit in order to gel along, you'vi ■ go along. I saw ei measure "1 *>> political bickering, sometimes ob- ["the trull, of Wh+;i»P '"<*. intelligent solution to the d lold inc. "Vi> "i lacing us. At tins period 111 our .. .1... ;- ,...' " Tor"r>- '' "'' engage' our lime' eiml efforl \ iiit 1 — in •-•. I-, 1 1- ■ 1 1 * i 1 able thai the m<*y • I1"1'1"''! bickering we may be i'i"h.'sl legislative '"'''' '" ""'" "'"' argue who gets lo iut knowiiie the r M'lal Parl '" ''"' show, while the |r meli',''''"' is burning down. ■(This thought recalls the expression or main ml-, desperate t° ^ l thou?ht ah0\<-rs Forum News, January, 1956 \i ws. Januarijr\ FORTHRIGHT OR TACTLESS? Paul M. Butler, Chairman of the Democratic National Committee, guest speaker at a luncheon where Congressman Alger was the only Republican present. tercharge. Perhaps even this serves a purpose. Wei] do I rcull tlif day I was the target. It was the weekly Texas Delegation luncheon where, as usual, I was the only Republican- -a Eacl which nn colleagues assured mr would never interfere with i in joining t lit'in. 1 wanted to attend each week, and did so except when House action made it wiser lor me to remain on the Moor. At this particular luncheon the Democratic National Committee Chairman was to s|>euk to us. Attempting to be thoughtful, both several days before and al the meeting, 1 sug- gested staying away, hut mv colleagues wouldn't hear of ii. So Mr. Butler spoke to u- and used me as his punching hag. pointing out that, well financed and determined, the Democratic part) "will see that vou do not return." For some thirty minutes this con tinued, although Gov, Shivers and others were also attacked. There was no rebut tal on my part. I might have reminded him lhat we Texans do not scare easil) or of main other things, hui his denun- ei ili-.ns were left hanging in the ur. Mv colleagues — several of them — apologized, though I never was sure what for. Because I was there? Beeause he spoke politically? Because I heard what he would have said it I weren't there? Was he just forthright or tactless? 1 do not know for sure — but I'm wondering il hell continue to underestimate me and other citizens of Dallas. From several congressmen I heard thc thesis, "What is good for me and my partv is automatical!) good for nn country," which 1 so heart il) detest. Mam congressmen sincerely believe that the greatest good for their countr) is their own re-election. They may say it jokingly; hut I'm afraid some believe it to be true. "Political" legislation came along, too. The twenty-dollar tax cut became a symbol to me ol how some men would bin votes. They knew that many unthinking citizens would be attracted by such a tax cut — and converselv it would lose votes for those congressmen who had the courage lo say "no" to such a measure. The liill was a surprise move, strictly along political lines in the committee, proposed before the year's appropriation bills were considered so that it was irrespon- gibly cutting over Iwo billion dollars off government income, even before government expense tor the year had been considered in the face of a heav) national debl. and a deficit in lhe budget. and lhe threat of inflation. It struck me as strictly a political move without the cur I ii I financial consideration which those holding the purse Strings should exercise. POLITICS ON THE FARM ISSUE I hen I heard other congressmen condemn lhe government's flexible crop support program which had been voted into law the previous session. Yet this program had nol even taken effect, because it concerned the L955 crops. Hen* I learned that speeches made on the floor can be r-cni back home to win votes. It's highly unethical, it seems to me, to blame thc crop situation on flexible supports when they were not yet in effect, in fad. it proves that rigid supports encourage overproduction - so thai just the opposite \ icw should be held. In anv event, some congressmen misrepresent the facts — apparently thinking it good politics. To me. this is nol [he honest difference of opinion which we Americans respect. One quickly learns seniority is important in Congress, since the important Committee assignments are awarded according to length of service. 1 was fore- ibl) reminded that some of the key congressional leaders are the same "New Deal" representatives of the 30*s and Page 5 < \ jfs Ilg
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