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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956
File 006
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956 - File 006. 1956-01. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 13, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/209/show/145.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-01). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956 - File 006. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/209/show/145

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956 - File 006, 1956-01, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 13, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/209/show/145.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 1, January 1956
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. V, No. 1, January 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date January 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 006
Transcript r they were not accustomed to having a maverick among them. It might be observed that thev neither claim me nor disown me; and this relationship I understand. \o one wants insincere friendship. I recognize and understand how men of differing ideological beliefs can maintain a respectful relationship — and that the area of disagreement is often greater within a party than between parties. There's the real dilemma. Among my Texas colleagues I soon recognized manv kindred beliefs and thai I was closer to some, ideologically, than they were to each other. I was learning daily. Anyway. I was far from overlooked. In addition to the Texas Delegation, the 84th Club (freshmen Republican congressmen) elected me their vice-president —- the Texas State Society provided the camaraderie of the many Texans in Washington the athletes of Congress, in the paddle hall group, welcomed tin- newcomer —- the S.O.S. group of Young Republicans in Congress extended membership. Very important to me became the Prayer (.roup — congressmen and women who met each Thursday for hreakfast and to -hare spiritual beliefs and encouragement. ORIENTATION Of course. I got lost in the Capitol! Particularly embarrassing was the time I nonchalantly acknowledged a guard's greeting, and confidently strode past him down what he must have known to be a dead-end corridor! Parliamentary procedure was bewil- dering at first —■ "The gentleman from Texas." "1 thank the gentleman" being customary expressions. One must be "recognized" before being privileged to -peak - - being recognized sometimes appeared to require adroit maneuvering. sometimes just plain shouting the loudest! The most gracious accolade of one member for another is generally the prelude to attack. A congressman might say, for example. "The gentleman from New York, my longtime colleague and esteemed friend, for whom I have t hi< - utmost regard and affection, and whose integrity is unquestioned," and then cul him to ribbons with big words and questionable logic. The decorum, or lack of it. on the House floor was surprising. As debate goes on, members walk about, confer with each other, read, write. I even sleep in the cloakroom), but the man who has the floor goes on undisturbed, until someone protests, "Mr. Speaker, the House is not in order." Often I sensed the spectators in the gallery were puzzled, even disappointed, to see the milling around, lark of order, or even on occasion the reduced number of representatives present. \\ hen some member objects on the grounds uf a quorum not being present, the Speaker counts Page 4 noses and if less than half the IV) are present, the assembly bells are rung and the congressmen reassemble to answer the roll call. I decided to be present on the floor as much as possible in order to learn the s\stem more quickly — even though I realized all too well the many reasons for being elsewhere, mainly in my office to answer mail, attend to "case" work, the problems of people back home needing federal help, and to meet visitors. Indeed I was puzzled by the simultaneous meeting of the committees (and all members behmg to at least one committee) and the House itself. No man ran be in two places at once. How was 1 to know the facts on the issues being debated if not present on the House Boor? lhe answer is, the Member ol Congress learns to be responsible lor accomplishing two things al once. It takes some tall hustling for a freshman to become adjusted to this feature — where he must know what is going oti simultaneously in two places. Main is the time we'd hurry from thr committee hearing to the floor to east a vote and then return to committee meeting. Alphabetically as an "\." Im among the first to vote — this only increases the rush. Nevertheless, 1 was determined that mv attendance record would be a good one. MASTERING THE SYSTEM I also learned that the importance of each Member of Congress is maintained sometime-- in odd ways, lor example, in parliamentary procedure "unanimous consent*1 is often required before floor action can proceed, so it is possible for one member to block normal operation. Thus, each member must respeel the others whose cooperation will be needed as Congress deliberates. The Members of Congress get prompt attention b) the Various government bureaus, and I found that the courteous efforts of mv Staff and me. insistent onh when necessary, resulted in our getting information when needed from various agencies of go\ ernment. In brief, whereas at first the system of governmenl seemed almost crazy, I soon regained respeel lor the operation — it even permit- individuals to "let off ■-team" at each other without upsetting the boat. 1 learned there were reasons for the odd and unexpected formalities of pro.i-dure. It is apparent that first an M.C. must master the system and then make it work for him. even as he work- to do his job. One senior congressman i- kidded about alwa\ - cam ing a "preferential motion" in his pocket. Thi- i- just a legitimate wa\ in which to get five minutes' time to talk when other means have failed. \- in every other business there are "link- to the trade." Other first impressions include the apparent conspirac) against lunch the House meets at noon and lln'(|M. mittees meet in the morning, at ]PX until noon. In the House, a nA (■ cant eat without leaving the floor* ro| nearest solution is to have a quick'],,, wich in the cloakroom, just ofl the|.,m, of the House. fan Then, there"- the Washington^ ,■ whirl, and congressmen receive ''"re- invitations to "whirl" at will. Well- ,'. I an exhibil ? Was I to "represent^--}, district at these, too? Soon this prof resolved ilsell as I realized I coi ■ burn the candle at both end-. I A'': were my onl) time to study and -Lnoi with mv family. We went out onlv hie. constituents were a part of the gatMld ii. "VOTING ONE'S CONVICTION lu nol Soon my baptism in natioi local interest came in the debaW hi vote on reciprocal trade. In hroaoints. eiple I agreed with the ['resident \i- \ on reciprocal trade. However. I -tern tin- concern of my District heavy import of foreign oil and I *pe an amendment to restrict su< I Hut the Holes (lommittee propo&oi "closed rule" on this bill, which Che permit no amendments to the m*-'* ui This so-called gagging of coi from -peaking out in open debate 're-t approved. lh" However, I realized that hundrffcs I other industries wanted In anid" ' " bill, hence the reason for the rul^t a tainK I did not want to vote for '-ike w ithoiit learning the facts c the effect lower tariff- would ha American industries. Neither did I 'I1" lo kill the trade bill by adding hil* h of crippling amendments. ieali/i"' 'ai our allies economic- and our '>f ;* '] effort- rti I tied in with it. a- |>-> continuing program not quickh ln' set a-ide. Yet I felt that the "peril I' ■ ■ and "escape clause" provisioi he strengthened, to protect those J '"! can industries genuinely threatened1" ^ was the first dilemma where I conflict of national and local int< ' l!l and I learned the meaning ol T" one- com ictions," So it was. too, that I learned thajF'.1 lative issues are seldom clear-cut. •", .'' is a bill all good or all bad - - bl* "' white. Mom* often it"- a shad. "' "' ' somewhere between either extrefl1' ways it seem- complicated and the J become- muddied quickly w ben [" ''' sive arguments on both side -enieil. Somehoyv, \ ou must get heart of the matter. Then I realized lhe truth of wh^11,1, eral members had told me. "W *' -t, have time to studv the issues." T^ seemed incoiicch able lhal lln of the nation's highest legislative, would vote withoul knowing ■''',, Yet true il i-. for many. 1 nights and weekends, desperate t° Later in retrospect, I thoughl ab°V Facts Forum News, January,
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