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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955 - File 053. 1955-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 14, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1539/show/1522.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-06). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955 - File 053. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1539/show/1522

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955 - File 053, 1955-06, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 14, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1539/show/1522.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 6, June 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date June 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 053
Transcript theory and production in tbe two countries. The official version has not attempted lo deny the pre-eminence of British nuclear science. Kapitza got his stent under Rutherford at Cambridge, which weis probably the leading prewar center of nuclear research. All the Manhattan Project scientists known to have given war-time secrets lo lhe Russians were British. But the galaxy of British scientists as a whole was far greater than Fuchs. May, emd Pontecorvo. Hence, even with lhe maximum allowance for Ihe value of the knowledge transmitted by this,' three, the British resources of knowledge remain far greater than the known Russian resources. Indeed, the- British tradition in the physical sciences and their ingenious practical application is unrivaled. From Newton to Lord Cherwell, from the steam engine lo radar, from lhe spinning jenny to the |el airliner, lhe island home of the industrial revolution has produced or attracted a fabulous gallery of scientific and technical genius, including—in lhe nuclear field—Thomson, Rutherford. Chadwiek. Cockrofl. Wilson. Penney, and on and on. Yet in spite of ihis acknowledged superiority of British nuclear science, in the face of obvious British superiority in access to the raw materials of the Belgian Congo, and ignoring the general superiority of Brllish auxiliary technology, we have been asked to believe' that thc Russians beat the British by three years in lln- race to manufacture an atomic bomb independently of the United States, and thai they now have em Atomgrad to rival Hanford. That thev have exploded one or two bombs of some kind we can creditif *e remember lhal their entire' projeel "as put under the supervision of Lav- fenti Beria. chief of their secret police, «ho mighl have arranged lo smuggle °>it of ihe United Stales enough "nu- 'leeii' components" for ;i demonstration "r so for the Soviet high command, ''nl lhal thev have em eilomic energy Project which is serious, complete, and °' a magnitude remotely competitive with that of the United States, we cannot lightly accept. OBJECTION AND REJOINDER There is one objection lo concluding quickly thai thc Soviets cannot have em eilomic energy project which amounts lo very much. The known occurrence of atomic explosions in Soviet territory is not such an objection, for, as wc shall sec in lhe following pages, they have in the past held a very real opportunity to shed fissionable materials from the United Slates. And as AEC Chairman Gordon Dean heis said. "With fissionable material in hand, il is not a difficult technical job to make workable atomic weapons."28 Bul lax as our security system lias undoubtedly been, we cannot suppose lhat the number of atomic bombs which mighl have been assembled in Russia from items of fissionable material manufactured in the United Stales can possibly constitute a stockpile seriously competitive with our own. To credit lhe existence of such a stockpile il is not sufficient lo have at hand evidence from lhe analysis of fission products in air currents emd evidence from cryptic intelligence reports theit somewhere in the Eurasian heartland two or three nuclear explosions have undoubtedly taken place. General Groves summarized this poinl rather succinctly at the time of the commotion over Truman's heresy. "All we know." said Groves, "is there were indications of nuclear explosions."29 Dr. Arthur Compton made' essentially the- same point: "Scientists know." he said, "thai there have been two atomic explosions in Russia, but wc don't know. of course, whether these explosions are the resull of a workable A-bomb."'"' And of course, if we don'l know whether these individual explosive devices, whatever thev were, were "workable" A- Itomlis. then we certainly don't know from this evidence alone lhal (he Soviets have a practical atomic arsenal within their own boundaries. No, the objection lo a low estimate of Russian atomic production is almost independent of our knowledge concern ing actual explosions, valuable as that knowledge is. The objection lies rather in the well known fact that the Soviel oligarchy mav use its executive authority to require an extraordinary concentration of Russiein eiml satellite resources on the struggling Soviel eilomic energy project. James Burnham made this poinl some six or seven years ago. Having observed theit "Soviet industry is for the mosl pent incompetent, inefficient, emd qualitatively al a low level,"31 and having pointed out the Communisl dependence on eunl addiction tofoo/sa (confirmed, as we have noted, l.v General Marshall). Mr. Burnham proceeded, nevertheless. 10 warn us how "importanl. for strategic purposes, is the economic concentration which absolute political control makes possible. This is of great significance in Connection with the production of atomic weapons. Deficient as they are' in almost all branches of economy, the Communists can concentrate the most and best of what they have both of human and physical equipment on ei task which they decide lo he dominant. 11 would, therefore', be el misleike In judge' their eilomic performance bv their general industrial level." This objection is nol to be brushed aside. Dr. Compton, according to the Associated Press, seiid. "The difference between the United Steiles and Russia insofar as manufacture of A-bombs is concerned is lhal the United States is using only one per cent of its industrial capeie'itv in the manufacture while Russia would have lo use eii leasl four per cent."34 This at otiee' accords with our previous general estimate of the relative magnitude of Russiein industry, eunl eil ihe same time suggests ei quantitative paraphrase of Mr. Burnham's point regarding concentration. Granted that the United Stales ought lo be able lo stav ahead in an all-out race on both sides (provided the' fight was "fair"), whal if lhe Russians chose to devote, seiv. leper cent of their capacrt*, to alomie (Continued mi Page nil 195* "The following is from the New Ynrl, Times of June H. 1949 (p. 1) i "Washington, June \ Federal Bureau of Investigation Re- port disclosed today theit llu-siee received ei shipment nf atomic research ele-viees from tin- United State's in 1947 anil thai two other shipments wen' blocked in I'll", and 1949.... Thr KHI reporl wee- brought Into 'lie open eel the espionage trial "I Judith Coplon.... Roberl .1. Lamphere, em FBI agent, testified In- had prepared the' document aleneit llie shipment ..1 eiti.mi.' implements te. Russia. Mr. Lamphere seii.l the ri'lieert wees 'authentic'- eenel thus lint tee be confused with ;i 'decoy* paper... deliberately |elein|ea| wll'l-' Mi— ' <>pl..ll weeeil.l find it.... Mr. Lamphere's report said no export license leeid been issiieal feer the shipment of atomic equipment that reached ^ACTS FOKUM NEWS, June, 1955 Soviet Russia aboard tin- steamship Mik- llelil Kutuzov ill August 1917. Tt seiiel a shipment of .similar secrel instruments wees leeiind eileoeirel the Bteamship Murmansk in N'e'U Yeeik harlmr Sept. 2, 1918, llllt Amer- [can authorities removed tin' shipment because it had not been authorized. Then s third Bhipmenl wees feieiinl eni ;i eloe-k in Claremont, N. J„ Jan. 11. 1919. em.I tlii- eel-e. weis confiscated, tin' report seiiel. Am- leerg liemglit tin- equipment thai reached Kussiei from tin' 'Cyclotron Specialties Com- leeiiiy.' tin- report continued...." -■' Moori'lieeul. ,,],. eit.. p. 136. 25 Investigation Hearing, p. 292. Hr. Oppenheimer had previously st;inal. however (p. 284): "I ilo not know anything aliout Russia." ' Science Bulletin, American-Soviet Science Society, October 1915. p. 4. r Hearings Helm,- the Special Committee mi Itomir Energy. 7"th Congress. 1st Session Pursuant n, Semite Resolution IT') (hereinafter rated eis Hearings Pursuant to S. A',., 17", IGovernmenl Printing Offiee, 1915- 16). |e. 1115 Washington Post, Jan. 31, 1953, p. 1. 'Washington Dail) Veins lUnited Press' .Inn. 29, 195:!. p. r,. II..11-1..11 /'.../ I Associated Press), lein .", I 1953. p. 8. ' James Burnham, The Struggle fur the World (John Day, 19171. p. 93 I Ibid. 'Ibid., p. 118. 1 Houston Post, Jan. 29, 1953, p. 12. Page 51
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