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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955 - File 052. 1955-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 13, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1539/show/1521.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-06). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955 - File 052. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1539/show/1521

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955 - File 052, 1955-06, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 13, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1539/show/1521.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 6, June 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date June 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 052
Transcript —— industrial capacity is required to produce fissionable materials—the recognized crux of the problem; and Mr. Raymond, who had been Adviser on Russian economies to the War Department, took Mr. Hogerton's broad specifications and estimated how soon the Russians might be able to meet them. "Russian industry," wrote Mr. Raymond, "having neglected the manufacture of precision goods, now finds itself prepared for the wrong type of war. "In time, of course'. Russia can improve the quantity and quality of the output of its precision-machinery factories. But it will take a long time. And no U.S. or England in its righl mind will export atomic-plant equipment to the U.S.S.R." [This is the soft spot in Mr. Raymond's reasoning, as. right mind or wrong, we did. in 1947, reportedly make such exports:-' but Mr. Raymond's argument still has force, both because tlle quantities of such exports were probably not greal enough to furnish a real competitor, and also because' eis General Marshall testified, the Russians as a rule do not know quite what to do with advanced equipment when they get it.] "The Russians," continues Mr. Raymond, "simply cannot hope to hem- a K-25 planl like the one at Oak Ridge within ei few years. This would be physically impossible. The Soviet industries which would have to supply the equipment for such a mechanical monster are too undeveloped." At this point it should he noted that this physically-impossible-for-the-Sov iets K-25 weis the onlv kinel of fissionable- material factory that the celebrated Dr. Klaus Fuchs knew very much about. He could nol have given the Russians much detailed help on a plutonium plant. And he could nol give ihein the equipment for any kind of planl. \l the lime of his confession in 1950 he "explained." according to Man Miieii'eheeul. "theii il was impossible for him. of course, to do more than tell the Russians the principle on which the bomb weis made. It weis up to the Russians lo produce their own industrial equipment, and he had been astonished [italics added | when they had succeeded in making ami detonating a homh as soon as the previous August. He knew. Fuchs said, that seien- lificallv thev were' sufiui'cnlly advanced; but he had not supposed that e ommer- cially and industrially they were so far developed." Mr. Raymond's survey of Russiein industrial capacity precluded the possibility of a Soviel K-25. and put a possible Soviet Hanforil some years into the future. "Even if Russiein science should be equal to the task, there is still no assurance that a Hanford could l.e quickly built." said Mr. Raymond. "Soviet scientists successfully worked out the theory of radar some years before ils discovery in England. Bul the Russians were not able to pul theory into practice, and did not manufacture radar equipment until long after both England and America had done so. ' One thing should be made perfectly clear: Mr. Raymond wrote before anything was known about Klaus fuchs. and he wrote before President Truman announced that an atomic explosion had taken place in Russia. When his analytical report of Soviet incapacity is read now. the more reasonable inference is not that Mr. Raymond weis em unreliable Forecaster, hut rather that the dramatic ami sensational characteristics of the Fuchs case and the Truman announce- ment blinded most of us lo Mr. Raymond's relativelv unexciting account. standing of lhe situation in Russia is that even when the basic facts are' known, they have, and I think we have cause to be grateful, sonic difficulty in making practical application of them. Dr. Irving Langmuir, eminent research director, who visited Russia in June 1915. reported, "The- thing thai impressed me most weis the extent to which they were working on pure' science. The Institutes | Institute of Inorganic Chemistry ami the Physical Institute] had no connection wilh industry."28 Even the scientists heul nol progressed very far if what Ur. Langmuir told the McMahon Committee in December 1915 was correct. "When vou go to Rnssjei. he said, "and you find lhal Kapitza, Fersman. FrenkeJ, and Joffe eill of —Wide World Phot" Modes of transportation in Russia—a Soviet locomotive on the New Turkestan-Siberian RR line versus a camel carrying two women and child to market at Alma-Ata, capital ol Kazakstan Soviet Republic. Rut pniseiie- as ii meiv I.e. ii is probable. The Russians can lieiiellv l.e- se'iiiiiis competitors wilh lhe United States, or with lhe I nited Kingdom, in lhe construction and operation of a complete atomic energy project. Sporadic explosions, perhaps contrived «ith quantities of fissionable mate-rial stolen from the 1 nited Stales, do nol alter the general validity "f Mr. Raymond's comparison. His observation of whal is apparently a characteristic gap between Soviet science, which everyone knows is occasionally brilliant, and Soviel "industrial construction." which, hi' s.ivs. "is still in the piek-aud-shovel age." is especiall) pertinent, and is supported hv other expert testimony. Dr. J. Roberl Oppenheimer. perhaps the most famous of atomic scientists, lold the Joint Committee on Atomic Energy in June 1919: "...my under- those men who eire working on problem3 that have nothing in do wilh atomic en- erg) when Joffe tells me and shows 111'' the- cyclotron started in 1938, work of which weis discontinued during lhe wen and is now just starting again, ana nils me the cyclotron will be finished in December of ibis year and he i- ll"' most prominent physicist thai has had anything lo do wilh nuclear physics when you see- that, you me con line''1' they arc mil carrying through u ''""' Italian project."21 [ Itedics added.] '''' I.angniuir's conviction was presumably based on the ev idenl rate of progress on lln- cyclotron. Mr. Raymond's instance of radar ''' illustrate ihe greater lag normally ,,v pected in Russia than in England '''" iwi'i'ii theory anel production mav |"'"' voke us lo re-examine what we haV' been eisked lo believe regarding ul<""" Page ."i0 FACTS FORUM NEWS. June. ' 955
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