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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955 - File 040. 1955-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 11, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1539/show/1509.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-06). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955 - File 040. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1539/show/1509

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955 - File 040, 1955-06, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 11, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1539/show/1509.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 6, June 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date June 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 040
Transcript (Continued frnm Page 36) hv \e liicvi.mi-lit"—backed by the lineal of Russian competition gained strength daily so long as tbe fallacious nature of its context was not exposed, for in itself il makes the strongest kind of appeal to em aggressively industrial nation. There is in facl absolutely nothing wrong x\ i t li such a doctrine so long as il is not used to exclude or obscure the vital importance oj the complementary hind of security represented by [initial! concealment and firm exploitation oj whatever monopolistic advantages the I nited Slales mux have achieved or been granted. True achievemenl does nol consist of energetically bailing water with a sieve. A painfully pertinent poinl is thai when \chievement is emphasized nol in connection with bul eil the expense of Concealment, vou get an industrial and scientific complex which, being ever larger and looser, is ever more readily infiltrated and milked of the information and materials peculiar to ils processes. More of thai in Chapter Four. Meanwhile, wheel of the credibility of Truman's statement, "I am nol convinced they have the bomb"? Will il la- eill right to examine lhal on its merits? I know thai in a rare vou ought lo "run scared"; so perhaps we should not elo or say anything lo lower lhe common estimate of Russian capabilities, mi the ground lhal il i- gooel for us lo believe the Russians are. breathing hoi on our necks. How about Irving lo gel the facts straight? There is probably quite enough to be scared about. But wouldn I il be silly, ami dangerous, in be scared of thc wrong thing? I submit thai the Story of Russian competition in atomic energy doesn t stand up verv well, even under such an amateur analysis as I can give il. 'lhe following historical notes aboul Russian industry would probably be stipulated, as tin' lawyers seiv. hv mosl persons interested in I li is kind nf discussion: FACTS ON SOVIET INDUSTRY 1. When the Communists leeeik over in 1917. Russian industry, always backward hv Western standards, weis badly disorganized as ;i result of the traumatic experiences of World War I. Four years later lln- siluaiieen was worse. Sir Bernard Penes savs lhat "According lo Bykov. Commissar for Industry, factory output had fallen hv 85 per cent, emd what was produced was looted by the workers, and the plant to boot."3 This wee- 1921. "We are a backward country," seiiel Lenin in the fall of 1922 (according io Valeriu Mann i ; "... our technical efficiency is next lo nothing."4 2. Russian industrialization began with the firsl Five-"} ear Plan, in 192:;. At that time, while, the United Slate- wa- producing ."3.(1(1(1.111111 automobiles a year, there were' in Russia, according In T. Zavalani, Albanian-born graduate of ihe Marxist-Leninist academy in Leningrad, "no traditions ol mechanical production ami technical management of a big-scale modern industry."'1 Nineteen twenty-eighl! Frederick W. Taylor started "scientific management" in America in 1889. Or mi they lell me. I can'l remember that far back. Bul I can remember 1928 well enough. '"The Plan, seivs Petri's, "had almosl l.i starl from scratch."6 No wonder that if you take 1928 eis ;i base ve'eir vein rein pie.i trends emd cite percentages which during lln- succeeding live- years make the Soviel I nion look good. 11 heul nowhere lo go bul up. The American Depression began one year later. The Depression was a living —Wide World Pholo Leningrad industrial worker time, bul the Okies wenl tee California hv automobile. I. Obviously ihe hist Five-Year Plan ami lhe see eiml eenel the- others repfi'senl work and lhe work had results. Russia in 1938 musl liave- been ei formidable industrial power, computed to llu- Russia oj 1928, or compared to India or Afghanistan. But, as a student of baseball mighl say. il is nol jusl where vou stand in lln1 league, it's wheel league v e.u re in. Possibly lhe mosl dramatically successful program of lhe Russiems weis that ..I "electrification." Thi- Dnieper Dam m 1937 had 600.000 kilowatts capacity, or almosl one-fourth ihe capacity of lhe (.rami C.niler today. ^ el w ith this fabulous advance tlie Russieen output of 36.4 billion kilowatt-hours in ihe greal ■sii\i,i year 1937 was about one third lhal of the I'nited States in lhe terrible Depression year 1937.' I In 1911 the Germans blew up the Dnieper I lam. '! heel i~ only one of the lings thai happened lo Sov iel industry during World Weir il. Total destruction hv ihe Germans, and ley the Russians themselves in their "scorched-earth" pol icy ol retreat, lias been estimated by lhe Soviets themselves (according to Zavalani i al about a third of the existing capital. The devastated area originally contained two thirds ol the heavj industry.'' Much has been made of transfers beyond the I reds, but il is hard lo ihink this can have- been verv efficient considering how transportation is always ;i bottleneck in the vasl Russian land mass, with one fourth the li.S. railway mileage1 in serve double the I .S. area, eiml no help from the highway system worth speaking of in the same breath with I .S. highways. 5. Since World War II there has no doubt been much reconstruction under the fourth Five-Year Plan. And a greal amount of goods has no doubl been imported into the Soviet Union from Germany although there is considerable doubt as to what shape it was in when ii got in ii- destination, or wheel productive use was made of it. Al a Cabinet luncheon on April 28. 1917. General George C. Marshall, then Secretary of State, reported on ;i Moscow conference ;is follows: "Two underlying motifs ran through all the conversations with the Riissiejns -first, money, and second, reparations out of Germany, i.e., in terms of production . . . The Russians have found thai the taking "I physical assets does nol gel than the resull they want in terms of goods, | Italics added.] Even taking of man agemenl personnel with the plants does nol suffice because the trained labor is not available in Russia." I his, from the Soviel poinl of view. is a seni of bleak picture, don'l vou think? In emv case lhe- re-sulis of reparation ami reconstruction combined seem I" have lefl much lo be desired eis feir as pulling the Sovie-I I niiin in a seriousl) competitive position with the I nited Sieeie-s is concerned. For a particularly importanl example, the Soviet I nion's planned electrical production for 1950 uees ,'12 billion kilowatt-hours.10 This is indeed well over double lhe Soviel pro- ilni'lie.u of 1937, hill il is s|i|| only aboul a fourth the l.S. production for 19S0." (Continued mi I'tige llii Bernard Pares, Russia (Copyright, ley tin' \ce, Vmerican Library of World Litera- lure, In.-.l. p. 66. Valeriu Men..,. Lenin (Macmillan, 1928), p. 394. _ ■' I. Zavalani, How Sinm^ h Russia? (Frederick \. Praeger, 1952), p. 1(1. 0 Pares, op. 'it.. |>. H°. I lee capacity ol llie Dnieper Dam eunl tl"' Soviel electrical energy output are from Zavalani, Op. dt., p. 13 eeenl |>. .r>7 la'spe'i" lively. Grand Coulee reapacit) i- inv.ai i" lie.- I'):..', // inlil lltimtme. p. 185. U.S. OUt" interpolated From ei table 1953 It mill Altitun,ie. p. 183. ' /enelleilli. e./e. i il.. |.|i. I 12-43. '■ The Forrestal Unities, edited ley \lillis I Viking. 1951 I. p. 266. " /ee\ elleliei. "/.. • it., p. I 17. " 1953 IVmill Aim,nine. p. 111.'!. the Pane ilS FACTS FORUM NEWS, June, I"■'■''
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