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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955 - File 034. 1955-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 19, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1539/show/1503.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-06). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955 - File 034. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1539/show/1503

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955 - File 034, 1955-06, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 19, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1539/show/1503.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 6, June 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date June 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 034
Transcript Few commentators ~|><>ii«-<1 it, bul thc sensational shake'up in the Kremlin lasl February bared for a brilliant instant out' of the Soviet I nion s best kepi secrets, namely: the real status of its atomic weapons program. Official Western estimates, such as those made by the Atomic Energy Commission, naturally lend to err on the side ol caution, depicting a Soviet atomic colossus possessing practically all the latest nuclear accouterments. liui there is another side of thf medal, llieit eif a complex iinlii3iri.il operation almost tied in knots lev ei series eef critical bottlenecks nf the type lhal have chronically be- deviled Soviet industry. This was all but s|icllcil out in Marshal Nikolai Bul- ganin's inaugural address" in which thc new premier 1. enliiiittia! "iiieeeiv serious shortcomings in many branches of our iiatieeieeil economy'1 2. blasted "our scientific anil research institutions (fori ...lagging behind in devising machines and production methods corresponding te> the presenl le'\el nl world technical eeehie'i ements" 3. took to leisk "industrial undertakings which are slow in the practical ei[>|ili- eaitinns of modern methods" 1. e'ellli'el feer tlle- Stock-piling nl the stale's material reserves ("reserves mean our mi_:ht anel strengthening of the country's ele-feaese' capacity"). Ml of this confirms whal Bulganin didn't spell out. Shortages of electric power, uranium and industrial calculating eunl control equipment arc seriously hampering Soviel atomic production. Representatives of some ci*rhly countries from lmlli sides 'if the Iron Curtain will meet in Geneva in -\ugiisl in the first international conference on peaceful use- of .ii.,mir energy. The' I .S.S.I!, was understandably reluctant tn agree to participate. It resists any dissemination of its knowledge -all participating nations ein- invited to donate both know- how ami fissionable material for President Eisenhower's suggested "atoms for peace" program eiml especially on this subject. What they fear primarily is that tie.' free- world may find mil lhat Soviet atomic strength has been less spectacular than is w ielelv |ielii'\ eel. There is g I reeisiin to believe thai tin- firsl Soviet atomic explosion, announced on September 2.'!. 1919. was not of a bomb luit merely the stationary discharge of ;i I -2 '>5 chain reaction. Allied intelligence gives credence lo ;i report of a German engineer POW who got onl of the Soviel I nion late- in 1951 after talking wilh German laborers anil technicians of tin- Soviet.atomic project. The moele-st explosion in lln- Kara Kiini Desert in the Turkmen Soviet Socialist lit-|ui!ilie e lees., io [ran registered on Western detection 11<\ ices. In spite' of theoretical advances, Soviel mastery of practical application "<„■ FACTS FORI M \7:ir>. .,,„;/ J955) p. 33, [t. had then evidently not gone far enough to enable them to manufacture a portable homh. Yel lhe lest was mine than a scientific success, for il set the West to guessing, and probably lo overestimating Soviet alomie strength. Thus was overcome a Soviet diplomatic handicap lhal had begun in 19 15 with the establishment of thc American A-bomb monopoly. Thc next Soviet atomic explosions were recorded in October 1951. These indicated that a bomb had been produced but that the problem of meiss production for stock-piling was unsolved. The Russians have always been strong on atomic theory. Dr. Peter Kapitza, lured hack from his 13-year self-imposed exile iti Great Britain, heis been working mi atomic fissiun since 19o5. Ion" before the Manhattan Project pot underway in lhe I ,S. He wets seconded by such noted Soviet nuclear physicists as Messrs. Ivei- nenko. Frenkel, Leipinsky ami Zeldo- vich. But Soviet achievements have been line in considerable pari to sonic two hundred German nuclear scientists and technicians rounded up ami transported tn the l.S.S.I!, in 1915. Among these weii' pupils eiml assistants of Professor Olio Halm who split the atom in 1938, something thai the Russians did not duplicate until well after World War II. Substantial Soviel knowledge also came from the United Slates and Greal Britain through espionage. I>ut the translation of theoretical knowledge to production operations has been difficult. Plant capacity is not like, that of the I .S.. which could draw on her metallurgical, chemical, machine tool, electronics ami transportation industries at will. Even wilh ils assembled know-how. Bussia heul lo do a fantastic amount of pulling and hauling to arrange the. veist integrated effort thai atomic weapons production requires. \\ hen a branch of Soviet industry elee ieli's that it needs to break a specific production log jam. it can bring terrific pressure, ingenuity and material to- ge then', hut ihis inevitably puis a sharp crimp into some other sector of the economv. Production of atomic weapons. the most complex "f eill industrial operations, practically precludes, however. starving emy area to feed another. All areas are essential. The required integration of national industrial resources for a full scale eitomie. weapons program was em acid lesi of Soviel planners, and they did not emerge unscarred. Todav three formidable bottlenecks still plague Soviet alomie industry. The shortages arc (1) of fissionable material, i2i of electric power ami (.5) of industrial calculating and control equipment. Let's hike- a closer look ai them. RUSSIAN URANIUM SCARCE Mmost eighty known minerals contain uranium, hut less than a dozen are The mushroom cloud has become a symbol e J& Sty e Pow have never been published, probably because s«cC ' nave i motive is anxiety over Soviet prestige. Atomic Botic abundant in the earth. For a uranium- bearing mineral lo he worth mining il must at leasl run .2 per cent of I (I.. But uranium sources in Soviel Bussia are lean and their geographical location unfavorable. The largest deposits are in the black shales einel slates of thc elcserl between Lake Balkhash and Afghanistan when- uranium-bearing tyuyamuyunite" lies close lo the surface. Bul ils richest form assays at best .15 per cent I I) . The second important uranium-bearing *Frntn Tyiiyii Minim, in Turkistan. Often elided t,< tyuyamunite. in sh g< Tl in K v;i III (It ra ,i|. ll, l,e Page 32 FACTS FORUM NEWS, June, 1955 F.
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