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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955 - File 016. 1955-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 21, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1539/show/1485.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-06). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955 - File 016. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1539/show/1485

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955 - File 016, 1955-06, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 21, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1539/show/1485.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 6, June 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date June 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 016
Transcript 195."!. when the Status of Forces Treaty was ratified. From the scanty bits of information that have leaked out, we know that over 400 American citizens were sentenced by foreign courts in 1953. We know that by November. 1951. over 1200 Americans were imprisoned in Japan alone. We know that Mrs. Antonie Pierre. wife of an American serviceman in Japan, was indicted by Japanese authorities because her rented house accidentally caught on fire. IMPRISONED WITHOUT TRIAL We know- that two American army privates (Scott and Crews), involved in ei beer-hall brawl in Sopporo, Japan, in April. 195k were still in jail nine months later (and may still be in jail) -withoul ever having had a trial. You sec. in Japan criminal eases are fre- quently adjourned and interminably delayed: and a defendant—even though he mav later turn out to be innocent stavs in jail until the verdict is finally in. Families of servicemen protest that their relatives are subjected to indignities, suffering, and denial of their rights as American citizens in Iceland— where the biggest political patty is the Communisl party; where thc second biggest newspaper in the nation is a Communist newspaper: and where anti- American feeling is intensely hitler. American servicemen are subjected to abuse and injustice in France—where one out of every four public officials is a Communist. We hem' these Status of For.es agreements with Moslem countries, where the penalty for petty theft is to cut off thc right hand of tbe offender. In America, the Constitution protects everybody, citizens and aliens alike. from cruel and inhuman punishment. Bul if vour boy is drafted and sen! overseas, he doesn't have lhal protection. He could have his right hand cut off if he got involved in a silly prank emd stole somebody's chicken. We have this Status of Forces agreement with the Communisl government of l ugoslavia. In every Communisl country, of course, it is high treason to criticize the government in power. An .American soldier who is caught in N ugoslavia criticizing communism could be sentenced to die. There was absolutely no precedent in American tradition—or even in international law—for the thing we did in July. 1953. when we gave away the constitutional rights of our own soldiers. When America weis an infant nation, the' greal Chief Justice John Marshall— father of American jurisprudence — carefully spelled out the constitutional principle that service in the military Pace 14 Forces shall not abridge or nullify an American's constitutional rights. Our high officials today hold that it is eill right to nullify constitutional rights of our soldiers overseas, because we can trust foreign governments to be fair. BAD BARGAIN FOR AMERICA No one wants an American soldier who commits a crime to go unpunished. Bul if our Constitution means anything, it means that every Aiinri. an. including soldiers, has a right to a fair public trial before fellow Americans. Il is true lhat some American soldiers stationed abroad an- tough characters who do willfully violate law. But it is eil-ee true' lhal musl American soldiers stationed abroad are decent, homesick, frightened, and bewildered hoys who were forced into military service and who have no means of defending themselves before a hostile courl in an alien land. President Eisenhower says that the Status of Forces Treaty is justified because il is reciprocal- -lhat in giving up jurisdiction over our own soldier-, we- acquired jurisdiction over foreign soldiers stationed here. \\ heit every Amerioetn ought to know is lhat American constitutional rights are not for sale or trade on anv terms. If the American governmenl acquired jurisdiction over 100 million foreigners in exchange for sacrificing the constitutional rights of one American citizen, it would still he em immoral and unconstitutional deal. But the Status of Forces Treaty was ;t bad bargain for America even if we ignore principles and make a factual comparison of whal we gave with whal we got. There are no foreign troops stationed in .America. Altogether, there may he in the I nited States ei- many as 15.000 foreigners here on some kind of mili- teirv mission eis ohservcrs. experts, or special trainees. On the other hand, there eire- approximately one million American troops stationed abroad. In acquiring jurisdiction over 15.000 visii- ing foreigners, we nullified the consti- lutionell rights of more than one- million .-American soldiers. Suppose one of lhe 15.000 foreigners does get in trouble here in lhe I nited States? AA'l vir he is, he gels the full protection of lhe American Constitution. He must In- represented by counsel; he musl have lime lo prepare his defense: he must have a full explanation of all charges made against him; he must be I'aeed hy his accusers in open court; he must be permitted lo subpoena, at governmenl expense, whatever witnesses he needs lo defend himself: he cannot be compelled to testify against himself. But an American soldier in trouble abroad is al lhe mercy ol people whilst' language be may nol speak, and who may hate him merely because he is an American. He has no guarantee of a public trial, or even a trial by jury: no right of appeal; no guarantee of freedom of speech; no protection against unreasonable searches and seizures; no protection against excessive hail or excessive finis: no presumption lhal he is inno- iint until he is proven guilty; no re- quiremenl lhat his guilt must he proven beyond reasonable doubt. That is how reciprocal lhe Status of Forces Treaty is. AMERICAN SOLDIERS BETRAYED If lhe senators who betrayed the rights of American soldiers hv ratifying this treaty need lo salve their core science, they can. of course, remembef the' weirning of Bedell Smith, old arm1 friend of Eisenhower, who weis I tuler- secretary of State when the Status of Forces Treaty weis under consideration. While testifying before a Senate committee in behalf of this treaty. Bedell Smith let lhe senators know thai they might just as well ratify the thing, because if they didn't, the executive vvotll" continue handling lhe problems as 1" did during lhe Tinman administration —hv secrel agreements. We are approaching the midnight' hour in tin- history nf American constitutional government; bul the hour >s n..1 vat too late. The American peop'e can have their Republic and their Con- stitiition hack if ihey eire not loo laz) and indifferent lo find out what is goin? on. or too cowardly lo stand up and he counted. Thev 'em demand the revocation ° : lhe Status of Forces Treaty and of ;" the other shadowy, ill-conceived, "" evil entanglements which are suckina ihis nation into a bottomless quicksan* of weir emd international power politic9- Bibliography Fifty Majot Documents of lite Tieeni''''1' Century, l.v Louis I.. Snyder. Published hy " Van Nee-treeiiil Co., In,.. New Yeerk, 1955. "Gl-ville, West Germany... Relaxed &' Combat-Ready," Vewsweek, Sept. 21, 1953. Congressional Record, Vol. 99, pp. 877*' 8779, 8781, 8835-8840, 9333-9334. "A Conscript Has \.. Rights," l.v I'-'" Harvey, The Freeman, January, 1955. "\ Desertion "I America," extension nl rl. marks l.v Hon. Lawrence II. Smith, Conp& tional Record, Veil. 99, p. A4461. "Governmenl by Treaty," by Ira E. Benn«*" National Republic, December, 1954. "Our Buys in Foreign Jails," National 'l' public, November, 19.", I. Excerpts from Paul Harvey Broaden**" Congressional Record, Aiifa. (,, 1954. -status e.l Forces Treaty," Human En'""' Dec. 8, rr,l. FACTS FORUM NEWS, June, l*sS
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