Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955
File 015
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955 - File 015. 1955-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 21, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1539/show/1484.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-06). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955 - File 015. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1539/show/1484

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955 - File 015, 1955-06, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 21, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1539/show/1484.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 6, June 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date June 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 015
Transcript If the reactionaries and superpatfiots had their way, America would pursue rigid, nationalistic policies founded on the ei-.-iunplion lhat we Americans—just because we are strong—have the right to operate on a lake-it-or-leave-it basis wilh the resl of the world. If we insisted on selling American soldiers alool from the citizens and above the laws of the foreign lands where' thev are serving, our forces abroad would no longer have the character ..I Friends participating vvilh their loreign brothers in a common cause. I In v would lee looked upon as conquering legions. America would be branded as ei militaristic aggressor jusl as the So\ iets are. In the end, we would find ourselves hated, isolated, einel alone in a dangerous totalitarian world. • • • Th.it was oti<- side. The oilier side will come nexl. Here eire views ol some who ilo lint approve of the Status of Forces Treatj. • • • TUE Slalus nf Forces Treaty abrogates basic constitutional rights nl American soldiers -crying on foreign soil. It repudiates one' ni America's oldest and '"lest traditions: namely, that the American flag emd ihe- protection nf the American Constitution follow our sol- Wers wherevei the) go. In America, anv spy. subversive, or ''fimined uf whatever kind is guaranteed j1 fair jury trial in open court. Fie can "ivoke ihe' Fifth Amendment, refuse to p8tify. .mil heap abuse upon official ''I'li'-i'nieiiivi'- ol our government, lint '"i American soldier who is drafted and torced in serve abroad can nove he ar- rpsted .en trumped-up charges by foreign Police officers, tried in ei foreign court, "■''"ten'-cd and punished, without even '■'viiiu ein American official present eil hk tried. Vmerican soldiers, stationed in /"'Iv-nini' foreign nalions. have -nine been '"fed in give- up their own careers, *'r own families, their own homes, in ';" abroad eunl serve the1 interests "I "feign people. Hut this apparently is nol ''""ugh. The'v musl ;il-i> he deprived of . "ii nin-t precious constitutional rights , order io keep out' foreign friends lr"'ll,l|y, !" the Ner ihr Oration-. present administration, as Roosevell and Truman admin- . ii is heul taste for America to "'""I up for American rights. V*7e musl ''uav- yield to the demands of our '"■-. or we will lose the privilege' ..I '1'ieiiieli'i in'j American blood anel Amer- '"i treasure to defend our alii.'-. 'dministration leader- and interna- '''"■'li-l- in the Senate argued that if a" 'lid not accepl llii- Statu- nf Forces I '''aty eunl permil American soldiers to tried in foreign courts, our NATO ACTS FORUM NEWS, June, 1955 alliance mighl break up. To an American who knows emd cares anything aboul our constitutional system, and who has any pride in American li'adi- lions. il should be obvious tbal an alliance which can be held together only eil the cost nl destroying tbe inalienable rights of our own soldiers is nol worth maintaining. \\ hen urging the ratification of the Status uf Forces Treaty, State Deparl- inenl officials promised lhal tbe treaty provisions would not set a precedent for agreements with anv other nations except those in NATO. lhe promise wei- -illy and dishonest on its face. If lhe I nited Slates governmenl will give away lhe rights of its own -oldier- lo thirteen of ils so-called allies, what will il say lo all ils other allies who want similar arrangements? The answer has already been given. Within a mailer of weeks afler the Stains of F'orces Treaty weis ratified. mu- Stale' Department—ignoring ils own "no precedent" promises — used the treaty provisions eis ei precedent for negotiating executive agreements with Japan, giving ihe Japanese criminal jar- isdjetion over American servicemen and their families stationed in Japan. Reflect nn lhal for ei moment. Some American serviceman who fought lhe savage Japanese from Guadalcanal to Okinawa now gels arrested hy the leikvii police' emd eieeused of committing ee crime. The American tinny can no longer take that soldier into custody and give him a fair Iritil in an American mililarv court The American army cannot even counsel with him or observe his trial lo he sure lhal he gels a fair one. The army -imply has lo turn ils back on lhe American soldier and let him • 31 whatever Japanese justice wants to give him. When the soldier's people back in the States discover that he has been sent to a Japanese prison for two years or five years or life, they frequently cannot even find out from their own gov- ernmenl what the soldier did or whal In' wee- charged with. All lhat bis wife and children know is thai their army allotment has been cut off. No one really knows bow much of Ibis has been going on. The Pentagon w ill not rcle'eise- figures even lo congressmen—on ihe number of American soldiers sentenced bv foreign courts as a result of the Status of Forces agreements. POLITICAL HEADS WOULD ROLL Foreign governments, of course, already have these figures. They know how many Americans they have in jail. Whv. then since the) are nol Irving to keep this information from foreign governments do Pentagon officials label il "top secret"? Obviously, lo keep the American people ignorant of what is going on. If the American public knew how many of our servicemen—and their wives—arc in foreign prisons, with no American constitutional protection, political heads would roll. The American voters would drive out of public office every person who recommended the Status of Forces Treaty, every senator who voted for il. and every senator who was eiliv-r too cowardly or too busy lo get up on the floor and register his vote on July 15. —Wide World KMotos GIs IN EUROPE—Berlin orphans (upper left) are feted at a Christmas party arranged bv L Company. U.S. Sixth Infantry Regiment. Bottom left, an American serviceman is entertained in the home of a German couple in Stuttgart, who responded to a campaign to invite occupation forces into their homes. At right, a corporal stops a German policeman for directions. Page 13 5? I
File Name uhlib_1352973_v004_n006_015.jpg