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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955 - File 010. 1955-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 13, 2019. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1539/show/1479.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-06). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955 - File 010. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1539/show/1479

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955 - File 010, 1955-06, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 13, 2019, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1539/show/1479.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 6, June 1955
Alternate Title Facts Forum News, Vol. IV, No. 6, June 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Contributor
  • Evans, Medford
Publisher Facts Forum
Date June 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 010
Transcript Boyer discussing whether Shugar or Veall should write an article in The Scientist, the Association's magazine, regarding plans for the control of atomic energy. Control by the Communisl party over a broad organization such as the Canadian Association of Scientific Workers could he used in a variety of ways not only for propaganda purposes, bul eventually as ;i base for recruiting enl- herents to that parly from among scientists and in due course, no doubt, for recruiting additional espionage agents in key positions in the national life. • • • Hut there would appear to he- a further basic object and result of this technique of secret membership of the Communist party organized in secrel "cells" or study groups. This object i- to accustom the young Canadian adherent gradually to an atmosphere and an ethic of conspiracy. The general effect on the young mein or woman over a period of lime of secret meetings, secret acquaintances, ami secret objectives, plans, ami policies can e-ei-ilv In- imagined. The technique seems calculated In develop lhe psychology nf ei double life eiml double standards. To judge from much of lhe evidence, the secret adherent is apparently encouraged never to he honest or frank. outside the secrel "cell' meetings, about his reed political attitudes or views einel apparently is led lo believe that frankness in these matters i> ihe equivalent of dangerous indiscretion ami a potential menace to the organization as a whole. Thus in a preliminary report which l.uu.in wrote on March 2". 19 lo. to l.t. Col. Ih'L'.'v. In- referred to a "cell or study group in Ottawa In which Durn- foi.l Smith. Halperin, eiml Mazerall belonged, as follows: th. y eilr.3i.Iy feel the need for maintaining ei ve-rv high degree nf security ami taking abnormal precautions eel their normal meetings 'eil...eel once every two weeks) since they are definitely ii"t labeled with any |n>liti<ael affiliations. Oil., (er tWO have e'Veae ee|i|in-ia| tlie' inhai- eliiitie.n nf new members tn mir -romp on the grounds that it w.eiilel endanger their own security. This describes precautions taken by this group before any of lhe members were asked to engage in espionage or oilier illegal activities. Evidence that this technique of secrecy among Communisl part) membership is favored -if indeed it heul not he-en inaugurated -hv Moscow, is found in a telegram dated August 22. 1945, from The Direelor to Zabotin, which reeuls in part: To Crant 1. V..nr 243. We- have here no compromising deetee against Veall, nevertheless tlie facl that lie has in hi- lleniils ee letter of recommentlation from a corporant Page 8 who was arrested in lari^leiml (which In- did eei.t teeke- care to destroy) cornier!- ee- tn refuse te. heevc einv contact with him whatsoever, the more so that many already call him "a Red." (Corporanl is ei cover-name used for a member of any Communist partv except lhal of the U.S.S.II. I \n inevitable result of this emphasis on a conspiratorial atmosphere and behavior even iii political discussions, correspondence, and meetings, which are' in themselves perfectly legal and indeed are the cherished right of everyone in a democratic society, would seem to he the gradual disintegration of normal moral principles such as frankness, honesty, integrity, and a respect for the sanctity of oaths, We- believe lhal ihis technique played a definite part in bringing persons . . . lo a slate of mind where thev could dis- regard the moral obligations which they had undertaken in connection with their public duties. \ reading of the- evidence before us. taken as a whole, indicates also lhal thi- technique seems calculated lo affecl gradually and unconsciously the secret adherent's attitude leiweinls Canada. Often some' of lhe agents seem to have hegiin their Communist associations through a burning desire In reform anel improve Canadian society according to their lights. Hut one effecl of prolonged habituation lo conspiratorial meilneel- and lln- conditions of secrecy in which these people weerk i- to isolate them from the great mass of ihe Canadian people. • • • \- the courses of study in the "cells" undermine gradually lhe loveillv of the young mein or woman who joins them, il is necessary to say something as le. the content of the courses pursued in them, as theii i- reflected hv the- evidence. The' curriculum includes lhe -lenlv e.l political ami philosophic works, some' eif them feir from superficial, selected to develop in the stud.-nls em essentially critical attitude towards Western democratic society. This phase of the preparation eel-e, includes ;i series of discussions on current affairs designed to further a erilieal attitude toward the ideals of democratic society. Bul this curriculum would appear in reality lo be designed not to promote -in ieil refill in where il might he required, hut lo weaken the loveillv of the group member towards his or her own society ets such. Linked wilh these st m I res eit all stages. moreover, goes an organized indoctrination calculated lo create in the mind of the study group member an essentially uncritical acceptance at ils face' value of the propaganda of ei foreign stale. \e eaerelinglv. the studv groups eire encouraged tee subscribe in Communisl hooks and periodicals. Tin' Canadian Tribune and Clarion of Toronto, New Masses I a periodical published in the United States), National Affairs "I Toronto, and Club Life have been among those- mentioned as regular ob- jects of study emd discussion in these groups, as well as selected books on Russia. In some cases lhe effect of these study courses seems to he a gradual development of a sense of iliviile'd loyalties, ol- ili extreme cases 'if a transferred loyally. Thus ii Means lo happen that through these siudy groups some adherents, who begin hy feeling lhal Canadian society is not democratic or not equalitarian enough for their taste, eire gradually led to transfer ei part or most of their loyal lie- to another country, apparently without reference to whether lhal oilier country is iii actual fact more or less democratic or equalitarian than Canada. Indeed, a sense of internationalism seems in many cases lo play a definite role in one stage of the courses. In these cases ih.- Canadian sympathizer is firsl encouraged to develop a sense- of loyalty, not directly to et foreign sleile. hui to what he conceives lo he an international ideal. This subjective internationalism is then usually linked almost inextricably through the indoctrination courses and the intensive exposure to lhe propaganda of a particular foreign state, with the current conception of th1' national interests of that foreign state .nul w iih tin- current doctrines eiml policies of Communisl parties throughout lhe world. e.g. Professor Boyer stated thai he gave secret information to Fred 11"-'' despite the oath of secrecy which he had taken, believing ilieil this step would further "international si-it eitilie- collaboration." Professor Boyer heul mil apparently inquired about lhe operations in practice of tin- various official organizations engaged in attempting to organize exchanges of mililarv and other information with the Seivi.'l Union, nor about lln' degree of reciprocity or relative balance developed in such official exchanges, nor aboul lhe relative merits ol various possible methods of increasing international cooperation in scientific and other fields. \\\> approach to th'' general question of increasing international scientific cooperation tint- appears to us iii have been relatively uniformed and unscientific, ;is w.-l! ;i- singularly presumptuous eiml undemocratic in arrogating to himself by secret action the sole right of decision mi such matters affecting eill tin- pea,pie- of (ianada, lhe United Kingdom, eunl the United Stales. His actions also involved a breach of oath. We sea-, however, "" reason In doubt the sincerity of his motives eis stated hv himself. This sincerity was played on successfully hv an unscrupulous and more sophisticated agent In Mazerall's ease' also, his desire I" FACTS FORUM NEWS, June, 19l>
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