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Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
File 064
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 064. 1956-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 5, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1463.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-08). Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 064. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1463

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 064, 1956-08, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 5, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1463.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date August 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 064
Transcript ^■i BBPPW^H f tains the political-"cruteh" principle. farmers, in self-defense, demand the crutch for themselves also. Albert Cornell Middletown, Idaho STEP TOO FAR To the Dallas Times Herald: According to a recent report, a lady of one of the southern states has been denied the privilege of registering as a voter because she answered "no" to a question as to whether she would bear arms for the United States. Her reason was, "By reason of religious beliefs, I am conscientiously opposed to combat services. I will perform any non-combat service required of me." . I am not a conscientious objector, and I do not concur with their beliefs, but in view of the fact the Supreme Court has ruled that a person may defend the Constitution l>v means other than bearing arms, I believe denying right of suffrage is taking a step too far. So long as any sincere conscientious objector stands ready, willing, and able to perform anv possible non-combatant service required, that person should never be deprived "I anv rights of citizenship. G. R. Hill Box 263 Seagoville, Texas SPEAKING OF LABOR Anti-TrUSt LaWS (Continued from page 3!) who sought to gain added profits from a constant supply of cheap labor, to keep wages depressed, to hire and fire at whim, to eliminate the expense of good working conditions, to extend thc working day as served their purpose. There were those who maintained that the labor union actually was a combination in restraint of trade. The historic Sherman Anti-Trust Law of 1890 among other things declared illegal every contract combination in the form of trust or otherwise or conspiracy in restraint of trade or commerce among the several states or with foreign nations. The cry arose that this provision applied with equal force to the labor unions. A series of cases in the courts disclosed the danger that unless Congress acted specifically, this interpretation would prevail and destroy forever the principle of free collective bargaining. In 1914 the Congress did act specifically under the provisions of the Clayton Act, declaring: The labor of a human being is not a commodity or article of commerce. Nothing contained in tlie anti-trust laws shall be construed to forbid the existence and operation of labor organizations or to forbid or restrain individual members ot such organizations from lawfully carrying nut the legitimate objects thereof. Nor shall such organizations he held or construed to he illegal combinations or conspiracies and restrained trade under the anti-trust laws. I direct your attention to the words in the Act, "the legitimate objectives." When the acts of the labor union, therefore, in conspiracy with management, result in price-fixing, or when labor unions enter into combines to re- Page 62 strict production, allocate areas, or fix prices, then the labor union is no more immune than any other combination acting to restrain competition. If labor unions conspire with employer groups toward monopolistic ends they arc not immune to the anti-trust laws. To bring labor unions within the purview of the anti-trust laws as such, would be to strike a blow against the collective strength of the workingnian. There might appear to be a greater advantage to management in lower wanes, fewer holidays, no fringe benefits, ancl so forth, but in the long run the economy of the country would suffer bitterly, which in turn would reflect management's problems. The high standard of living brought about through the process of collective bargaining has resulted in increased consumer purchase, increased demands for goods, increased production, and the sum total of economic gain both for management and for labor. I repeat the language of the Act, "The labor of the human being is not a commodity or article of commerce." More than that, finally, I say that the human being himself is not a commodity or an article of commerce. RiiTiisivrvnvi: IIikstand: Why do we Americans enjoy thc highest standard of living the world has ever known? Why? It's no secret. It's because we've learned to work together. It's because the machinist, the miner, the small businessman, and the corporation executive all form an efficient industrial team. Each depends upon thc other for a raw material, a finished product, or a means of livelihood. To protect this team we have passed laws. Some guarantee the rights of individuals to work under our free enterprise system. Others prevent people from creating monopolies that work against the best interests of aD the people. These anti-monopoly laws arc effective today in controlling mergers and the size of corporations, but they contain a loophole that makes them pitifully weak in protecting the average vvorkingman. This loophole is the exemption given to labor organizations. I'm not tilting at windmills- This labor monopoly has already happened. Its cancer has already broken out in scores of instances which forfl1 ;i quickly discernible pattern. Todtty in a growing number ot cities, the price of your milk at home is set not by the store owner where you shop, but by the local union leader. The same is true in the eaT cleaning and laundry field, and in others where unions have stopped compe- tition by putting independent fin11' out of business. Small business especially has been victimized, in many cases liquidated. A number of new* papers have been forced to close- Farm truckers headed to New Yof» City have been compelled to stop a"" pay an extra day's wages for not c3f rying an unneeded union helper. During the 1954 Kohler strike, thjj CIO United Auto Workers import* 2,5(X) big city goons from Detroit an" elsewhere, for fifty-four (lavs theS hoodlums terrorized the small W1*' consin village. The issue was compo sory unionism. Thc CIO had clccted Kohler for a rich harvest of du* whether the employees wauled to j"1, or not. Walter Reuther, President ° the U.A.W., and in my book thc A tion's number one Socialist, masW|j minded the Kohler violence. Today fl ranks high in the gigantic AFI.-C power bloc, a bloc which has as 'a goal the unionization of practically""1 workers in our country. Its power immense. From its 70\000 locals »*. 200 national unions it extracts *P\ million a year in dues alone. It ov^ gorgeous buildings, it controls ban it has great investments in Wall $v Its welfare funds are colossal. Its CO i bined treasuries and resources dvv j the nation's largest corporation. * . all this is under the control of "l. whose disregard for law and of" and whose goal of state socialisf1 . ■4 ell ki There's no bargain' Facts Forum News, August, frill Ptrm
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