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Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
File 056
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 056. 1956-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1455.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-08). Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 056. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1455

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 056, 1956-08, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1455.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date August 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 056
Transcript This is the book they're trying to ban! This is the book, of which U. S. SENATOR JOHN MARSHALL BUTLER says: '"To those who minimize the scope of the Communist conspiracy . . . to all Americans seeking to safeguard our bastion of freedom . . , truly this is A Handbook for Americans — for all Americans to read." Packed into 64 pages of highly informative reading, generously illustrated with pictures of witnesses and top Communists . . . THIS IS THE INCREDIBLE RECORD . . . the authentic, documented-true account of Communism in America, exactly as it was revealed and recorded by the Senate Internal Security Subcommittee during months of investigation. Facts Forum, Inc Dallas 1, Texas Please rush (postpaid) of "The Communist Parry of Ihe U.S.A." * • I enclose payment of S Name Address^ Town _State_ This Offer Is Good Only While Our Supply Lasts Page 54 sanity, her retentive memory, and her abiding religious faith to "psychological self-defense," as built up by various prisoners through the grim years, and mercifully transmitted to her. This was done by means of an ingenious wall-tapping code (explained in detail), which enabled the prisoners ( many of them highly intellectual) to communicate from cell to cell in unbroken circuit, as long as each took the trouble to learn the code, orally. Writing materials were seldom permitted. In some places the chief diversion was speculation as to "who would be liquidated next." She had no contact with the outside world save while being transferred to another prison by train and Black Maria. Pathetically, she found stimulation in those brief breaks, from having glimpses of people not under guard. Sometimes Elizabeth had a cellmate. One was Rita Vassilyeva, a Zinoviev partisan, also accused of complicity in the Kirov killing; she believed that the NKVD had had Kirov murdered. From Volkov, a fellow-prisoner in an isolator where solitary confinement was not continuous, Elizabeth learned that he was sure Lenin had been poisoned, presumably by order of Stalin. Sofia Nikitina told of Zoya, her adopted daughter, an attractive young girl who obtained entree to the Kremlin; she had orders from her own lather, a White Russian in exile, to shoot Stalin, and almost succeeded; but she was not quite shrewd enough, hence was detected a few minutes in advance of the act. Zoya and all her associates were slain or imprisoned Natalia Trushina, servant of Na- dezhda Allilueva, who became StalinS official wife, related how she had been sole witness to Stalin's choking Na- dezhda to death within the Kremlin, after he had tired of her. "There art only two exits from the Kremlin, Natalia said. "To the political isola- tor, or to the next world." Yenukidze, former secretary of th* Central Executive Committee ol thc USSR, told Elizabeth that Stalin himself had given the order whicl finally brought about Kirov's assa* sination. Elizabeth objected: "NikO| layev killed Kirov to settle a person! grudge." Yenukidze insisted tha' Stalin had fanned that grudge. Bad of all was the fact that Kirov had received a larger vote than Stalin in tn* secret ballot for membership in tn* Central Committee. From that moment, Kirov was a doomed man. Another woman prisoner, former'! of the Kremlin, said, "Kirov's deal was urgently required by the Kremlin." At another time she remark*! that Roza, wife of Stalin between 19* and 1938, was a breath-taking beautj but far from happy. Stalin had f"lf wives, variously; none was in an eJfl able position. After release, Elizabeth Lermolo'* held the "face of a victim" in a mii'rl'' She was shocked. She did not ret nizc herself. During eight years *1 had never once seen her own rcfl**' tion. But she succeeded in recreatijl her image in words, most vividly. T™ record of her experiences is an imp**] sive contribution to Soviet cri"1 nology. U. S. Immigration Policy (Continued from page 15) semidarkness behind the Iron Curtain, look to the United States for the help that vvill not be forthcoming — under the present law. A number of bills introduced in Congress propose changes in parts of the Walter-McCarran Act. A bill sponsored by Senator Herbert H. Lehman (D-N.Y.) and a number of other con- gressmen asks that the entire national- origins system be done away with, subsequently establishing a worldwide quota of 250,000 persons annually. Senator Lehman's bill, S. 1206, provides for the creation of an Immigration and Naturalization Commission. Incorporated within this Com mission would be the present natnf'1 zation and immigration responsi''1, ties of the Departments of Justice ^ State. A complaint heard frequently / that the present immigration work consular officers is merely a part-«1 occupation, and, usually, a kind apprenticeship duty lor embryo ' eign service officers. But at the S;1 , time such consular officers wield0* mendous power in regard to u'1 applying for admission into the I "' States. (Continued next ft ""Should Basic Changes Hi- Made in U. S. Ir gration Policy?" op cit., p. 18. "Ihul.. p._22. Fa< is f'oiu-M News, August, 1»' I'A'i. for *>ve'
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