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Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
File 055
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 055. 1956-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 8, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1454.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-08). Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 055. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1454

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 055, 1956-08, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 8, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1454.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date August 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 055
Transcript of the Constitution. Any justice who fails tf) measure an action against any and all provisions of the Constitution is not car- tying out the duties of his position and is violating his oath of office. Therefore, the three little words" would seem to be •Uperfluous language. In our lay opinion, "*e same may be said of the entire pro- Posed amendment, with or without the wree little words, because it does not re- Quire the application of any new criteria. We are persuaded to this conclusion by fre simple logic of the situation. The Su- Ptvine Court has already asserted its belief tr|;it a treaty can be used to make legal *nat the Constitution forbids (in Missouri °». Holland) and must have made its deci- Sl°n after judging whether the subject freaty violated "any provision of" the Confutation. Since the Court could and did J°ld the Migratory Bird Treaty - a treaty Jteliberately and notoriously entered into '0r the purpose of violating the Constitution — to conform to all provisions of the institution, a more intornatinnalist-inind- j** court certainly would not he restrained y an amendment that at best is an '."''iiimilioii to (he courts to judge a treaty ln terms of whether it violates "any proei- (" the Constitution. In fact, since the Paginal resolution was first proposed, we jj*ve se< n the Supreme Court usurp the '""'ion ot the Congress and literally "-'"'M legislation. '1 the Constitution is what the Supreme 'n,iit says it is, and you it ml your eol- ^glies hold this to he true, then there is ^^ning in the proposed amendment that [lr,'v,'iits the Supreme Court from ruling *}'(Xt it is not a violation of the Constitu- !°11 to do all the things that have heen ('"11' and or do all the things we are rear- "' ma> be done. A '' not only find no protection for J^erica in this latest, or Dirksen proposal, ,'* We find that it contains a provision 1,11 could give constitutional authority for p';"iti\,- ,irts that arc now illegal. It re- l'"es no unusual exercise of the imagina- 0ri to foresee that this proposed amend- ,"'"'• if submitted to and approved by e states, would promptly he field to give e President power to make international jlJ;'" inents having the force and validity . *rcaties, without consulting the Senate. t, l,,s we could, with logic, anticipate that r j- future of our foreign relations would . U°w the pattern established b> the no- J^°uslj disastrous and secret, yet still Renounced, Yalta Agreement. . . 'in,illy, it is our belief that this revised I °Posal would appear to have originated Partisan and personal political concerns, 1(,r than concern for our country. t 's our recommendation that you re- L. °e this proposed amendment; and , ""■ resolution die at the close of the '■ In any event, we cannot snp- ixirt it. Respectfully yours, Ruth Murray Winifred Barker National Coordinators, Vigilant Women for the Bricker Amendment Book Reviews !-il„.,.I, is alwayi danfferoiu, l'i't '* tlie >afrsl tiling we have. — IIaiikv Emersom Iosdick The Three-Dimensional Man By A. M. Sullivan, P. J. Kenedy & Sons, 12 Barclay St., New York 8, N. Y., 1956, 297 pp., $4.00. Ideally developed, the human being i.s three-dimensional, possessed of "a personal integrity, a community responsibility, and a spiritual awareness." Thus avers Mr. Sullivan, himself multi-dimensional, having won recognition as poet, business executive, magazine editor, film and radio writer. To his titles must be added that of gifted aphorist. This book is not for quick reading and laying aside, but rather for treasured ownership and reference. Mature in outlook, it should nevertheless appeal to the youth whose thoughts "are long, long thoughts," bestowing upon him a wealth of ideas of which he will say, later: "I'm glad I learned that while I was young." A handful of quotations may serve to buttress the foregoing comment. Of Education: "The show-off wears his culture on his sleeve." "The act of learning is a selfish enterprise unless we can find a way to share our knowledge with others and test its quality." "The search for learning is a quiet venture for the person who looks beyond emotional vehemence and violence for the essential fact." Of Government: "Periodically men arc tempted to hand over their total liberties for any semblance of comfort and security. It is always a bad bargain." And again: "The cry of 'one world' has attracted the attention of political moralists who fail to realize that internationalism is not the antonym of nationalism, but is the absorbing sponge that obliterates political identity, ceo nomic independence, and cultural personality. World government is a trap. . . ." In philosophic vein: "Despite the long history of human perfidy, inequality, and folly, virtue has maintained a slim managerial control." "The tragedy of Spectacle recreation is that it limits or forbids the participation of the individual. It is infinitely better to be a marcher in a parade than a spectator, even though then1 is v *> Fori m News, August, 1956 Consult your bookstore for books reviewed here — or ter'tte to filth- lishets listed. a vicarious thrill in looking on and beating time." Touching American history, some interesting side roads, commonly bypassed, are explored with zest by this author, who obviously delights in presenting the unfamiliar. If there be a flaw, it would be in the style, which so abounds in parallel construction and in lyrically-cadenced prose, that it could bear the occasional introduction of a sharp sforzando. a meandering ruhato, or a dissonance half-resolved. On the whole, however, it is a satisfying collection of polished essays. Face of a Victim By Elizabeth Lermolo, Harper & Bros., 49 East 33rd Street, New York 16, N. Y., 1955, 311 pp., $3.75. The 1934 assassination of Sergei M. Kirov, then secretary of the Leningrad Communist Party and ranking second only to Stalin, resulted in a wide netting of suspects. One of these, Elizabeth Lermolo, was brought to Stalin for his personal questioning at NKVD headquarters. Her connection with the crime rested upon two pieces of "evidence": (1) She was the pretty wife, about 30, of an exiled officer of the White Russian army; (2) Her name and address were found in the notebook of Leonid Nikolayev, slayer of Kirov. Elizabeth had by chance talked with Nikolayev when, during the previous summer, he had visited his aunt in the provincial village where Elizabeth was living in exile. Under Soviet law, the circumstances established her guilt as co-conspirator, and as "confirmed foe of the working class." Condemned without a trial, she was for eight years shunted about from one to another of eight different "isolators," or special prisons for political prisoners. In them was no forced labor, as in the concentration camps. Miraculously, she survived the indignities, the bitterness, the misery; finally escaped and was reunited with her husband. Alter long hardship as refugees from Russia, they eventually found sanctuary in America. Elizabeth attributes her life, her Page 53
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