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Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
File 051
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 051. 1956-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 30, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1450.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-08). Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 051. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1450

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 051, 1956-08, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 30, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1450.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date August 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 051
Transcript !!° Jhicl at- Organization (one of regional import), which per- m|ts United States soldiers abroad to be tried in foreign Civil courts of the NATO nations for nonmilitary offenses. *as characterized from the floor of the Senate as "a brazen challenge to the constitutional authority of Congress." "hat purpose could it possibly serve if we were to be committed to obnoxious, socialistic, regional treaty obliga- 'ons just to avoid involvement in the same sort of situation Under one super-treaty? Will regional arrangements prove to be more than treaties perpetuating and streamlining Power polities? The need for such pacts reveals the impotency of the Present UN organization. A student facing the situation w"h intellectual honesty cannot but abhor the tremendous j"1(l unfortunate waste of economic substance occasioned y all the effort required to block, if possible, the preda- .'"> designs of those who would enslave the free world. d one whid onsent, eve< Id join us i iition to tbJ dvocates tb state, eithe avoid surrett ussian woiw •y, calling f* hioned up0' iy, which la'' ■ to this ide< s the right : non of afl n to captuj ie world in* conflagratM ired our fas' snt, and oif irld" intern* f only a fa* Charter" $ he one-won "In hearioj iter revisifl lade it cl"111 ions from *" rstate, eitW E that is v government I.] '. number ol nations are endeavoring through power poli- lts and diplomacy to solve th<' international threat to Peace and security. Therefore, a strong defense area, acting within the UN r;"iie\vork. can successfully defend itself against aggres- y°n, supplementing the force which is lacking in the UN itself. e United Churches Mb, Religious idealism is embraced by an estimated 95 mil- '"'" „| 1"t to ch, our people, over one half of the entire population, mention nonmember constituents. The voice of the l"r<-'h must therefore be heard. I Glancing at the eight religious systems represented j'- '"ember states, the IN records reveal a total of *p7,000,000; the Christian ideology represents 40 percent ? ,l"' whole. The National Council of Churches of Christ "><' I nited States has membership representing more ■i Bed with * yard throi'l, iclc 52 of 1 a diploma1 be achiev'i \ ing the nda ancl * ie attemp1*! nd creating •r vulnerafl offset So^ :ation of tlj objective ltly avaik" u backs; tlj it is obvi"1: ig our V"11 tus of Foffl forth Atlanc West (arm* August, , '"i 35,000,000 persons, with an annual budget of about "Oimillion. , lne World Council of Churches is now allegedly en- ( goring to invent ways and means of advancing an j '"'"'in'eal thrust in religious effort for the purpose of Q/Uencing international affairs and the United Nations. , "' ol its avowed objectives at Evanston, Illinois, in 'Rust, 1951, was its pledged support in the struggle for I e"gious world community. No one could seriously chal- t| 8e the idealistic nature of an objective predicated on ■I. tenet ol personal regeneration. The arrival of the '""'loin of God" in the hearts of men world-wide (in- dud '''id '"'-! those in Russia and the Far East) would promptly Wars. i n the light of Christian theology, it is doubtful if any , '"'"'h planned league will ever achieve the divinely "used reign of peace. Certainly peace can never be L, "ased with American dollars. There can be 'Hi, no peace- ^"•xistence between the "kingdom of God" and com- "isni. . Tl,,.. "ill *u, id Iiurch must not be intrigued by wishful thinking 8 program of roseate peace by man-made, Soviet- '"'"ced covenant. Peace at any price — even to the '('"<li'i of inalienable rights - is a monstrous idea. f|'U(,A. not peace, should follow in the wake of surrender. ''v,S'' portentous times call for deliberate study, not 'allied in pronouncements. Mik - .—. ■ .1 i l the rights of mun, inalienable and in the , ls country is the onlv one in whic "ding freedom to worship, are ,'"""1 realm. The amendment of Article VI of the fed- Constitution would keep them there, beyond the K 'ls I'mu \i News, August, 1956 power of temporal government. The proposed amendment would not induce isolationism, or be a step in that direction, but rather the prevention of the filching of our rights as citizens, which rights internationalists seem willing to fritter away. IV. THE UNITED NATIONS' ACCOMPLISHMENT In the UN are member states believing in free enterprise, whose chief concern is world security. But they have been hamstrung by Russia. What is needed is the concentration of UN energy in the field of international peace and security — that simple, firm agreement, backed by deeds, not rhetoric. If this be promptly done, the organization may yet be salvaged. If not, it is doomed to failure: Americans will refuse to surrender any more of their sovereignty without the attainment of international peace and security from aggression. We do not need Soviet-inspired social, political, and economic treaties. Rather, we require unanimity to prevent aggression already overwhelmingly found by the General Assembly of UN to exist. To this must be added the evolution of a codified international law, implementing one of the avowed purposes of the charter. The difficulty of the task must not deter the effort. We would not wish to detract from whatever good the UN may have done. In passing, it must be noted that credit for accomplishment must be shared, since many political, economic, and other factors conditioned whatever success was obtained. From the San Francisco decennial meeting in June, 1955. five great issues emerge: (1) Unification of Germany, (2) The problem of the Eastern satellites of Russia, (.3) Communist China's use of force and threats of force in Korea, Indochina, and Formosa, (4) Efforts of "international communism" to overthrow government by conspiracy, and (5) Disarmament. To those subjects the American citizen must add the issues of UN Charter revision, and the amendment of Article VI of our federal Constitution. In this connection it may appear rather prosaic to mention the American taxpayer, who is customarily ignored in summaries of UN activities. The taxpayer is entitled to an accounting — comprehensive, widely publicized, with nothing hidden. It is one thing to consider the insignificant eight cents per capita annual contribution toward UN maintenance as an organization: quite another, the burden of $400 per capita for defense outlays. This nation should not at its expense provide the police force for the free world. Those "captured" satellites should be induced to fight for their own freedoms. V. FALLACIES INHERENT IN UN CHARTER The UN was conceived on bases bedrocked in that charter which are believed by many legal scholars to be false — except as to aspirations. Fallacy No. I is that expediency, in an effort to obtain peace and security, may be successfully substituted for underlying law and the administration of justice thereunder, contrary to the experience of history. This fallacy would substitute a government of men for that of law —a fallacy thought to have been buried in Magna Carta. In place of expediency there must be a comprehensive code of international law, predicated on justice, consistent with Page 49
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