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Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
File 050
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 050. 1956-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1449.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-08). Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 050. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1449

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 050, 1956-08, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1449.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date August 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 050
Transcript ■■ would succeed in prolonging international frustration, and would present a hotbed for insidious socialistic and communistic infiltration and growth. Communism is socialism gone to seed. We do not have the united nations anticipated under the charter but two groups of nations that are widely separated. The Russian concept of security has split the world into halves. It is quite possible that the human race has not yet suffered sufficiently to visualize the disaster likely to follow atomic warfare. Since it is apparent that Russia's consistent "veto" has been predicated on a violation of the pledge of the member states to give every assistance to the UN, and to refrain from assisting any state against which the UN is taking action, it is imperative that a laissez-faire attitude approving the status quo may no longer be tolerated. 4. The Better-lmplementationists A fourth school of thought favors bolstering the UN organization. It would provide greater force of men, munitions, and foreign aid; or would supply additional power — or all. There seems to be little sense in giving ourselves away. We permit urgently-needed domestic programs to languish because of professed lack of funds. At the same time, our spending has been such as to produce annually upwards of S12 billion for interest on past deficits, without amortization, while still going deeper into debt. Economic prodigality has thus far characterized this country's support of the crumbling world situation. The recent report of the President's Materials Policy Commission revealed the United States is possessed of an exhiius- ible residue of resources, rendering a possible crisis by 1975, at the present rate of dissipation. This very possibility was envisioned by Stalin and his associates; it appears to be a definite part of the Soviet over-all strategy, Americans in growing numbers believe that a permanent give-away policy will not solve this nation's problems. There are those in this school of thought who advocate withdrawal of the "veto" power. This would certainly be a gross long-range mistake. Until an escape valve be set up in UN machinery, allowing withdrawal and ejectment from that organization, the veto privilege continues to provide national insurance against loss of sovereignty. It is inconceivable that Russia, as one of the great powers, would consent to removal of the veto power. In no way can it be removed other than through amendment, with Great Power unanimity. Still others contend that the UN can be made workable to secure world peace through thoroughgoing amendments. Russia, however, will not consent to any amendatory procedure which does not, in her opinion, bolster communistic objectives. Russia has vetoed almost everything proposed by the free world through the agency of the General Assembly ancl the Security Council of the UN. We may anticipate her favoring amendment, provided she perceives opportunity to seize world control through an emphasis which selection of delegates on the basis of population might yield. Senator Knowland said in May, 1955: "Our survival and that of the entire free world may depend on how alert we remain to the fundamental strategy of world communism." We face, then, the strange and preposterous dilemma in foreign relations that we have already been committed tlrrough the charter to a treat) from which we may not Page 48 with impunity withdraw, out of which we may not ejed a recalcitrant Great Power member state, and one whid we cannot alter without that member's consent, evef though fifty-eight other member states should join us H seeking the change and even adopt a resolution to tM elfeet in the UN General Assembly. 5. The World Federalists This fifth school of thought militantly advocates tn expediency of creating a huge world federal state, citlw within or without UN framework. The UN Charter was carefully drafted to avoid surreH der of sovereignty by any nation. But every Russian wouJ like to see a world communist government. Ours is a philosophy of individual efficiency, calling i* personal responsibility and achievement, fashioned upo' personal worth rather than managed economy, which Is'' tei truly ignores the forgotten man. Corollary to this ide* of profitable service for the advantage of all is the right self-determination of others — the sine qua non of ad lasting peace. The failure of our generation to caputf and implement these ideals has catapulted the world in* two enormous conflicts, has brought on the conflagrati* along the perimeter of Eurasia, and has obscured our fai" in ourselves, our institutions, our government, and 0* destiny. Under a plan accredited to the "one-world" intern* tionalists, it is claimed that the adoption of only a ft* "apparently innocuous changes in the IN Charter" $ sought. From there on, the UN will form the one-won government. On August 5, 1954, Senator Bricker said: "In hearini before the Wiley subcommittee on UN Charter revisM many world-government enthusiasts have made it cle» that they seek to transform the United Nations from * organization of sovereign states into a superstate, eitn* by treaty or by executive agreement or, if that is tfi feasible, by informal charter amendment." [For a more detailed discussion of one-world governma4 already proposed, please see the Appendix on p. 51.] 6. The Regionalists A sixth school of thought, while not satisfied with nj present UN organization, would move forward throuj regional arrangements, permissible under Article 52 of •£ Charter. They would employ the UN as a diploma™ instrumentality until something better might be achie^L It would appear that Russia, while employing the " as a sounding board for Soviet propaganda and entrance for communism, is at the same time attriiip1 frustration of the West through diplomacy, and creating protective belt of satellite states outside her vulncnnj' frontiers. This sixth school of thought would offset So^ effort by regional arrangements. The application of "j "common-sense policy," if confined to the objective security, seems to be the best vehicle presently avail"" within the UN framework. But even regional arrangements have drawbacks; tfj involve some calculated risks, for example, it is obV1^ that they carry the possibility of conscripting our y°\ for military service on foreign soil. 'Ihe Status of F0(\a Treats among the fourteen' countries in the North Atlf" °ED's. NOTE: Now fifteen, sine- tlie addition ol West Ceil"'1' Facts Forum News, August, ^ Treat; mits l civil co *ftS ch; fallen What , commit 'ions ju under < to be power The Present *ith in f"d U11 by all i tory dt ^ 'mini "<S an Peace . Tiler muiiou '*>", s, itself. '•The Relig ,lQn of ""t to , *urch , Glan, b me l>«47,0( ','' the s *an :]- to mil , The "eavori "''""ie, 'n""en< ,h<' "I ^gust lr<'ligi< l('l %"t('" >gd, ll"d,„„ ""'1 wa I '» tl, "'"a.,1 '"'"■"is, """"su , Tlu, "'to ., s* Send tN •\<«,l, , n„s Hdi, *>a 'n'l C, V I s I
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