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Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
File 048
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 048. 1956-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1447.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-08). Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 048. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1447

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 048, 1956-08, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1447.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date August 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 048
Transcript Voting independently, it and the Security Council elect the judges of the International Court of Justice. Upon recommendation of the Security Council, it admits new member states and appoints the Secretary-General, who supervises the Secretariat. It considers and approves the budget and apportions expenses among member states, who contribute the entire financial support. The Security Council is composed of eleven members, five of whom — designated the Great Powers (Nationalist China, France, the USSR, the United Kingdom, and the United States) — are permanent. Six are elected by the General Assembly for two-year terms and are not eligible for immediate re-election. Each member of the Security Council has one vote. Decisions are made by at least seven of all eleven members; but on substantive matters these seven must include the concurring votes of all the five permanent members, this being what is popularly referred to as the "veto" power. Article 27 (3), thus providing, becomes a storm center of the charter, and has been credited with much of the league's impotency in security matters. Contained in the charter is a statement of purposes: (1) To maintain international peace and security by peaceful means, and in conformity with principles of justice and international law. (2) To develop friendly relations among nations based on respect for the principles of equal rights and self-determination of peoples. (3) To achieve international cooperation in solving problems of economic, social, cultural, or humanitarian character. (4) To be a center for harmonizing the actions of nations in the attainment of these common ends. Of special significance are certain other provisions, as, for example: Nothing contained in the present charter shall authorize the UN to intervene in matters which are essentially within the domestic jurisdiction of any state. Membership in the UN is open to all other peace-loving states which accept the obligations contained in the present charter and which, in the judgment of the organization, are able and willing to carry out these obligations. The admission of any state to membership in the UN will be effected by a decision of the General Assembly upon the recommendation of the Security Council. Nothing in the present charter shall impair the inherent right of individual or collective self-defense if an armed attack occurs against a member of the UN, until the Security Council has taken measures necessary to maintain international peace and security. Nothing in the present charter precludes the existence of regional arrangements or agencies for dealing with such matters relating to the maintenance of international peace and security as are appropriate for regional action, provided that such arrangements or agencies and their activities are consistent with the purposes and principles of the UN. No enforcement action shall be taken under regional arrangements or by regional agencies without the authorization of the Security Council, with the exception of measures against any enemy state. The term "enemy state" applies to any state which during the second World War was an enemy of any signatory of the present charter. The Security Council shall at all times be kept fully informed of activities undertaken or in contemplation under regional arrangements or by regional agencies for the maintenance of international peace and security. Page 46 Amendments to the present charter shall come id force for all members of the UN when they have bee adopted by a vote of two-thirds of the members of th General Assembly and ratified by two-thirds of the melJ hers of the UN, including all the permanent members < the Security Council. III. SCHOOLS OF THOUGHT ABOUT CHARTER REVISION «j ilier, They I ably vv some i long as ""'"kin "vailab ''"j'lVill 1)(' the ; 'oniaril ""' ma It is thought, in the light of experience, that this counf "ie kit committed two colossal blunders during and followirf. "esigni World War II: (1) It was unnecessarily ambuscaded poW establis ically through an improvident executive agreement ' "°man: Yalta. This subsequently resulted in a coalition betwe* J'milar Russia and an impoverished Oriental horde, rich in m&] c'°rn I- power. It has divided once-friendly China into two wai factions, productive of revolution and world insecuri' worse, if possible, than the Axis power which that wrecked. (2) This country was induced to over-emphi social cooperation while permitting to languish the m: effort of common defense for the free world. Instead of inducing world harmony, as was hoped, * reaped the harvest of a world divided into two camps, peculiar ideologies of which are at antipodes from e8< other — democracy and religious idealism on the one haJ| and atheistic communism on the other. One of these' destined eventually to survive. Many students of contemporary history therefore ct>j tend that the UN organization is not only anemic but si* that it evinces definite signs of dying altogether, uni* drastic restorative measures be administered. The United Nations is at present a huge internatioflj mirror in which arc candidly reflected before the flo<* lights of public opinion the foibles, shortcomings, deed and sinister objectives, as well as the altruistic efforts, the nations of this world. In these reflections communis is beginning to stand revealed for what it really is. *J Soviet voice is steadily becoming theatrical and hollow-' ministers are turning from suave diplomats into the caning jesters they are. "Firmly based on the Mar"'' Leninist doctrine known as 'revolutionary parliaments!" The, tl> 'ess eft "la "at "y w "tions J"st "ski tic; mg ar. '[ Tl ace So; full '" *hal 5> i the cha Hat .'"""IS enate , >tio, <loi I'ri national in 1920, replete with directives for using a w ^er parliamentary framework for illegal acts; the talkat™ technique has been employed by Soviet spokesmen & agents ever since" (Robert S. Byfield). We are discovering that while this international sbtfj in progress in the UN forum, a greater threat to our H" ties is cropping up at the grass-roots of our repubBj the weeds stealthily sown in our own backyard throw infiltration, collaboration, and deceit, while our attend has been fixed on the main performance. A number of independent schools of thought have tl% lore arisen respecting the UN as an agency to secure W' peace and our relation to it, with wide divergence opinion. 1. The Indifferent Group Th i its course, much as il 'experts" in governmental philosophies enact their Facts Forum News, August, indifferent group would permit the UN expen»»j to run its course, much as if it afforded a stage upon vv™. in»': "Tie; '0rS(,(1 ,,;'»".,i i ism' are the usual Soviet tactics of obstructionism, proci filiation, and endless debate, and the resort to seina" '""liorit skulduggery. This pattern of procedure was fully * E*°plo, scribed bv the Second Congress of the Communist In" "r ci el, >'s, te .Is t "laril Jfi; Sa] S^ i S up Sid g '"l"v "Ion tl act. is |.
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