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Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
File 047
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 047. 1956-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1446.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-08). Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 047. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1446

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 047, 1956-08, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1446.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date August 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 047
Transcript his country. I* lts membership, and Communist China, an aspirant distasteful to us, is rapping at the door. Communist China's hands are unclean. During 1949 and 1950 she liquidated an estimated 15,000,000 of her own people. She is reported as busily spawning narcotics, employing the illicit funds therefrom accruing to support totalitarian objectives. She has been twice condemned in ™e United Nations — once when found guilty of aggression in Korea, and again when illegally holding eleven of our airmen, while defying the free world. She therefore hardly qualifies as a "peace-loving state." "orld diplomats envisioned that at long last aggressive Jv"r. genocide, and enslavement not only had been out- «Wed (as was the considered purpose of the Kellogg- "riantl Pact), but had been banished from this earth by the stroke of the pen. Implementing that dream, aggressors were ferreted out, rJWrged as war criminals, and punished in Nuremberg and okyo. in accordance with new criminal procedure, post- ,lt'tiially tooled lor the occasion. Defendants were accord- U far more consideration than would have been given hem by the ancient Assyrian Hammurabi, the Cartha- S'nian Hannibal, Genghis Khan, Caesar, Ivan the Terrible, 3r "luit we reasonably might have expected had Hitler t*evailed. There was reflected in those trials something of e graciousness engendered by principles of the Anglo- rnerican system, which operated to water down the ()V|et approach. The United States Supreme Court denied ''PlH-als on the ground of lack of jurisdiction in the prem- l's- 1 he proceedings were prodigious military trials, """l"e in history. America, the granary nation, went on an enormous rending program to rehabilitate that portion of the odd which had been devastated by war. Eight years , l'i we Americans were being castigated as "imperialists" ... 50rne ol the very nations which had so recently been "berated." *"y outstanding men of international stature helped Tne the United Nations Charter. Alger Hiss, however, our poll to eliiiiiii'1'1: .te suppor* in Francis" ui* si" itted M. 'ofr; j. Secretary, helped organize the United Nations. Harry 1 Mer White represented the Treasury Department. Vir- nr""s '"rank Coe served as technical secretary-general (,. ""' founding committee and later became secretary r "'at hind. Harold Glasser and David Weintraub '""ici.,,,,11. j 'thin the workshop of the UN organization, aside from ,ll»s ol false hopes, are many distinguished men and ""'ii. laboring iu the cause of world peace, now fully lseious of the limitations imposed bv the charter under *|J* they serve. . "e world's "grand jurv" of public opinion returned a t| (' '"II ol the indictment charging Russia with thwarting II l;t'isr of peace. Her shift in action from promise during | '"'lade is now manifest. Accordingly, one hesitates to .'"'i critical of the original design which failed to u "'Pate one of the five partners' deserting the intorna- refl ""n formed to stabilize world security and casting j» ®ction upon its good will. Had we generally known of M 'el design, the charter probably would not have been J1Snt.,i. ' l,r " adequately functioning United Nations would have ,k Ver|ted the Korean debacle. A military truce in Korea S||j'"''l not be accepted in our thinking as an ultimate t|( 'M""te or solution for the riddance of the communistic 'Cs of underground infiltration then', here, or else- t, K Forum News, August, 1956 where, postponing until some more convenient season a renewal of open hostility. Russia seems willing to bide her time, employing captured satellites as buffers while slowly but steadily moving forward to a master plan of world conquest, choosing at will the weak spots as they ripen into easy prizes. A decade ago America held the initiative in atomic secrets by which, through a convincing manifestation to use them, if need be, she might have solved almost overnight such questions as a divided Germany, the air lift, the Korean war, and other aggressive acts of communism during what we have glibly called "a cold war." That vantage passed, while we toyed with socialistic treaties, wondered to what peaceful enterprises the hideous monster could be harnessed, and permitted the Soviet to develop that power for purposes of world conquest. II. SCOPE OF THE UNITED NATIONS CHARTER The aspirations of the free nations are found in the charter's preamble, which at the very outset adopts expediency as a substitute for law, in an effort: (1) To obtain and preserve international peace and security; (2) To achieve the economic and social well-being of the peoples of the world. Thi' following basic principles govern the charter: (1) All member states are sovereign and equal. (2) All are pledged to fulfill in good faith the obligations assumed under this charter. (3) In its international relations no member shall use or threaten force against the territory and political independence of any state or behave in any manner inconsistent with the purposes of the UN. (4) All are pledged to give every assistance to the UN when, in accordance with the charter, it takes any action, and to refrain from assisting any state against which the UN is taking action to preserve or restore peace. (5) So far as is necessary to peace and security, the organization attempts to insure that non-member countries shall also act in accordance with the principles of the charter. (6) It prohibits UN intervention in matters essentially within the domestic jurisdiction of any state except when acting to enforce the peace. The principal organs of the UN are: the General Assembly, the Security Council, the Economic and Social Council, the Trusteeship Council, the International Court ol Justice, and the Secretariat. The General Assembly, in which each of the sixty member states of the UN has one vote (though it may send as many as five representatives), is the main deliberative organ of the organization, and the nearest (yet remote) approach to a Parliament of Man. It receives and considers annual and special reports from all other organs, initiates studies, may discuss and, save where the Security Council is dealing with a dispute or situation, may recommend to member states and other organs on all matters within the charter's scope, including their powers and functions, as well as the means for promoting international cooperation in political, social, economic, cultural, educational, and health situations. Decisions arc made on ordinary matters upon majority vote of those present and voting; on important matters, by a two-thirds majority. It elects the six non-permanent members of the Security Council, all eighteen members of the Economic and Social Council, and a varying number of members to the Trusteeship Council. Page 45
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