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Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
File 046
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 046. 1956-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1445.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-08). Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 046. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1445

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 046, 1956-08, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1445.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date August 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 046
Transcript — ! | ^'** INTRODUCTION We are warned that the civilization which we presently enjoy might be dissolved before our very eyes, unless man's lust for power through revolution and war be promptly curbed. Since we have taken the lead in establishing the United Nations, with the rank and file of the world's citizenry desiring the peace which its charter professes, we do well to consider the basic documentation of that union. The author, a prominent Ohio attorney, surveys problems and issues, and out of the often complex, confusing UN picture brings a measure of order and understanding, together with a workable and practical formula for the future. His book is fully documented and replete with scholarly material. The serious reader will be richly rewarded by studying the book as a whole. WORLD PEACE BY COVENANT A CONDENSATION I. HISTORICAL BACKGROUND The dream of world peace based upon an international order of government and law is a concept that belongs to the modern world. There have been other epochs in history in which periods of international order have appeared, but none in which there has been a conscious effort to build a world order upon established principles common to all people. The Boman Empire is the best example; it was an international order accomplished by conquest and subjugation of the known world. Such procedure is, we hope, not possible in the modern world. Certainly, from the American point of view, it is not desirable. The Pax Romana is of more than passing historical interest, because it contains theories that tire today of great practical importance. Having gained the world by force, the Roman found it expedient to rule by law. He compiled a body of law, drawing heavily on the local rules of conduct of his conquered peoples. This law, the "law of nations," later formulated into the Code Justinian, was done perfectly enough to furnish one of the enduring and significant patterns contributing to civilization. Only within the last thirty years has any real attempt been made to convert into reality the dream of world peace along democratic lines. William Howard Taft advocated a League to Enforce Peace. Woodrow Wilson designed the League of Nations, allegedly to make the world safe for democracy — a league which lasted but nineteen years, and into which the United States refused to be drawn. Franklin D. Roosevelt, in collaboration with Winston Churchill, promulgated the Four Freedoms — freedom of speech, freedom of religion, freedom from want, and Page 44 freedom from fear - expressed in the Atlantic Chart* Harry S. Truman spurred into being Roosevelt's cflort lor a United Nations. From history, and from the best thought of the West* world, we learn that international order must be pre* cated either on force or on law. There are no alternative* The choice is ours, and the wisdom of our choice and the materials we use will be determined much later 1 our posterity from the manner in which our edifice, f United Nations, weathers the storms of present and fuW years. For nearly a century and a half before this counts participation in global warfare Americans had iiiilnl'-' an isolationist policy, predicated upon the admonition George Washington to avoid foreign entanglements f distinguished from foreign relations, which latter are R escapable between nations. True, our nation during the interim had relaxed ' aloofness to include our hemispherical neighbors wit'*' its protectorate. That relationship developed undi Monroe Doctrine had already become bedrocked into " . national thinking long before 1914 — a doctrine contini"^ by the recent Act of Chapultepec. Without bore defense, we had become accustomed to live at peace <fl Canada. It was our participation in the first World War wh1^ cracked the shell of isolationism. It was the second Wojj War which made us indeed extrovert in our potttfl thinking. On July 28, 1945, we went all-out to elimiii'1, war, when ex-President Truman and the Senate support' the United Nations Charter, adopted at San FrandL by the delegates of fifty nations, representing sol' 1,700,000,000 people. Sixty nations are now admitted Facts Forum News, August, 1™
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