Keyword
in
Collection
Date
to
Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
File 039
Citation
MLA
APA
Chicago/Turabian
Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 039. 1956-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 30, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1438.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-08). Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 039. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1438

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 039, 1956-08, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 30, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1438.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

URL
Embed Image
Compound Item Description
Title Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date August 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 039
Transcript lling them tbs1 ig to buy yo« s," he charged ; in the electicn some politics ur propagand s immediater lem any got* ed Mr. Prim iverwhelmingl gone the otbt! auntered. " jch things. V things in tertf e it if some < imc to us. qui vocally, -aveled throu; countries ir reporter : — what I ha' olutely that iho wants 01 aks a day. a TARIFFS OR FimTkaxJuB ?. I r. Castle kn<* s in newspapd in. Henry Clay once said, "The call for free trade is as unavailing as the cry of a spoiled child for the moon. It Ver has existed; it never will exist." Thomas Jefferson, although one of the strongest proponents of free trade in American history, tempered this °l with protection for American industry when he said, "I have come to a resolution myself, as I hope every good len will, never again to purchase any article of foreign manufacture which can be had of American make, be difference of price what it may." Today the call for free trade is gaining an ever louder and more insistent voice. Senator William E. Jenner (R-lnd.), on a recent Facts Forum radio program, said in effect that without tariffs to rs of AmeriCifotect American-made articles from the competition of articles produced abroad in countries where the cost of living y you are gO»J 'ess, American industries would suffer. rough the leg1 Congressman Richard E. tankford (D-Md.) contends that the United States, in order to fulfill its role in the world, Units the <"'ijSt acf wjth more consistency _ mat we cannot combine political internationalism with economic isolationism. !vs "behind ^ Which philosophy meets with your approval? The remarks of these able legislators may be of assistance to you like we are d< r6Qching your own informed opinion. vanerica?" asK h Radio F« ,., . hefk) K.N s"m JknnEH: We have heard a e been used effectively by commercial nation in the world. rl t- reall 'ot °' arguments in recent years Mr° Castle, against tari,fs' Wllil<' v"" hear ' i.l -.1. I °f the talking, one might believe ven though ' m . ... =J _ b a lse ' tar'tts are some evil device m- _i eCU ,nd J1''''' Dy RepubUcan senators to stifle real news an" L^-^, ^ N fa ^^ , ,A.y the truth, t we should ' f. . t^i t u„„ .'"uls were invented centuries ago Khrushchev y , *» Mr. Castle L ' 'I certainly I Qwn ^.^ ^^ ^ ^^ i ■ v si i tlle first United States Congress. .:','." , '^ p'Tpose, as pointed out by Alexan- ° C^i,i I Hamilton, was to give American cving our Ch1 inxiry a (.||a||(.r, (() s|ar((,(] m ^ to Moscowri lof Hr.jtjs|i (,,,mp,,liti(,n xjjeBrit. rders on the* 'government tried to keep the eolo- ;'• Jiut "iy (7 from building industry as a part Id be that L exploitation program. When the ,y home. It v feies won in(lependence they k]1(.w .tographed, ' t ind,lstry was necessary to raise will have t' 'national living standard and for iy way ot hse. In fact, one of the reasons we Hnued on /<<" Pst lost the War of 1812 was that United States industry could not produce enough weapons. As American industry grew, and with it its wage scale, tariffs were needed to protect American living standards against Cheap foreign labor, because nowhere in the world had wages gone so high as in the United States. Thus, the tariff became a "cost of living" tax on goods produced by cheap foreign labor. The tariff system now works like this. Suppose it costs three dollars to make a shirt in Massachusetts: two dollars for labor and one dollar for material. The same shirt in another country where wages were hall as high would only cost two dollars: one dollar for labor and one dollar for material. If these foreign shirts could be freely imported into the United States, they would drive American shirts from the market, throw thousands of textile workers out of jobs, and the dollar saved would be lost many times over in unemployment vs, August, iv-iA, Forum News, August, 1956 benefits and lost wages. All of this would happen, not because our shirts are inferior, but because American workers have a high living standard. Actually, conditions would be much worse than in this example, because there are very few countries in which workers get anything close to half the American wage. In some areas of the world, a good wage amounts to no more than a few cents a day. That is where tariffs come in. Tariff laws put a tax on foreign- produced material which takes care of the difference in wage rates, thus giving American-made goods an ecpial chance with foreign-made products. In the case of our shirt, the tariff ought to be one dollar. Naturally, this is a simplified example since many other factors enter into production costs, such as mechanization, relative efficiency, and better management. A reciprocal trade program is a system of mutual tariff-cutting between two Page 37
File Name uhlib_1352973_v005_n008_039.jpg