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Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 038. 1956-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 8, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1437.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-08). Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 038. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1437

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 038, 1956-08, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 8, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1437.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date August 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 038
Transcript I l» might succeed in doing it? Isn't that the purpose of this whole program?" "I have great faith in the American people," replied Mr. Castle. "I don't think the average American has this fear complex that we seem to be showing all the time. Our 'slips are showing' constantly in this propaganda thing. Take for example this USIA booklet which we each have before us. It shows the highlights of a half-year of accomplishment. Is this what we are asked to pay $135 million for? "They have only three of these 'highlights,'" he said, referring to the booklet. "One is 'give the world a clear look at U. S. policy on major issues of the Summit Conference.'" A Job for Newsmen Mr. Castle pointed out that the USIA is not needed for that job, since we have 1500 of the ablest reporters, newsreel, and TV men in the world who are legitimate reporters. "Another item shown in this booklet," he continued, "is 'launching a major program to dramatize President Eisenhower's proposal for exchange of military blueprints with the Soviet Union.' That is not a matter for press agents. We know from Khrushchev's statements while he was in London that they don't even want us to 'look into their back garden.' That's the way he put it. So that's a job for diplomats. You can spend $400 million, and never accomplish it. "And here," he went on, "is the last of the three 'highlights': "publicizing intensively the United Nations Conference on Peaceful Uses of Atomic Energy at Geneva.' Now, gentlemen, the President of the United States has expressed satisfaction with the fact that that is becoming a world organization. Are we going to spend American taxpayers' dollars to promote the Soviet Union in a joint atomic energy proposition? That's what we are headed for! "Those are the highlights," he summarized. "I think that is a pretty poor bill of particulars for $140 million." "Now further back in the book," Mr. O'Connor pointed out, "they break down into specific details what that program has done; thev claim to have reached an awful lot of people around the world with the sales talk about our great democracy, and I think rather than resulting from a fear we feel, one hypothesis is that this propaganda results from the benefits of advertising we have seen in this country." "You cannot sell America to foreign- Page 36 , ers!" declared Mr. Castle emphatically. "You can't do it in the same way that we sell a can of beans and a package of corn flakes in this country. One of the greatest weaknesses of this USIA is the very fact that we are trying to promote ourselves to foreigners as we sell goods to Americans in the United States. The taxpayers shouldn't be inflicted with that kind of proposition." Mr. Castle pointed out that advertising men are guiding the USIA. "In other words, Mr. Castle," asked Mr. Prina, "you believe that people who know how to sell a bill of goods to Americans cannot necessarily, in your words, 'sell foreigners'?" "I think there is as much difference," insisted Mr. Castle, "as between the Rend "the other side" of the question in next month's issue. Facts Forum News will publish the Reporters' Roundup interview of Theodore C. Streibert, Director of the United States Information Agency, in which Newsmen O'Connor and Prina base mam/ of their questions on Eugene Castle's charges in "Press, Promotion, and Propaganda." advertising department of an American newspaper and the editorial department. You gentlemen both work in the editorial department. No one comes up from advertising and tolls you how to do an editorial job. You'd throw them downstairs!" "And by the same token," pointed out Moderator Hurleigh, reversing the hypothesis, "the sales staff of a newspaper, magazine, or radio station would not want the editorial side to tell them how to do their sales pitch." "If USIA confined itself to the true dissemination of news of our government policy," Mr. Castle said, "spent $20 million or $50 million a year, it might do more good. But the trouble is that they have too much money to work with. As a result they go into movies and kiddie cars — they are going into TV now. "And, incidentally," he remarked, "we are now being accused of buying the British Broadcasting Service by sneaking in our propaganda films. That came over the INS wire from London. That doesn't do us any good." Mr. Castle related that our movie trucks had assembled people in out- of-the-way places all over tbe world, and that after the movies were through, in many eases. Communist or local agitators had inflamed the people against us by telling them th* "the Yankees are trying to buy you blood with movies!" "We create situations," he charged "We did tbe same thing in the electiol in Italy. We loaned some politics faction there one of our propaganu trucks. The Commies immediatel] picked them up on it. . . ." "And it didn't do them any good Mr. Castle," interjected Mr. PriD* "The election went overwhelming! anti-Red." "But what if it had gone the othe way?" Mr. Castle countered. "W have no right to do such things. W have to look at these things in ten" of how we would take it if some ( those people did the same to us. VHH "I say to you, unequivocally," l stated, "— and I have traveled throug twenty-three foreign countries aJ consider myself a fair reporter, a though not a great one — what I ha' Ht seen convinces me absolutely that v#»ver | are giving the guy who wants <" T^ steak a day three steaks a day, a^d he doesn't like it!" ^en Mr. Prina asked if Mr. Castle kro*^ how we could get news in newspap* behind the Iron Curtain. To Se Need Straight Reports of Amer/Citotect "I think the only way you are go'"' 'ess, to be able to do it is through the leg" C<J imate press services. That's the 0"iust a way you are going to plant it." "Can't you get news behind '"J Iron Curtain by radio, like we are <* 6Qc' ing with the Voice of America?" asK< Mr. Prina, "or with Radio 1'f< Europe?" N , "The voice they really like to h® ^ j the one that they listen to that re» J " carries weight," said Mr. Castle, L "J. the Army Radio — even though \ ^ broadcast in English — because • ^ j non-propaganda. It is real news and ^ reflects us as we are." . \ .', Asked if he thought we should ' f. ' vite Bulganin and Khrushchev (j , come to Washington, Mr. Castle ] terv ' plied emphatically, "I certainly \' not." % j, "Well, what would you think, & |pUrn asked Mr. Hurleigh, "of the curt| l> r,^ thought of possibly having our Ch' Hh| of Staff or others go to Moscowr |fc0f' "That, of course, borders on the (* ^l L^ itary," said Mr. Castle. "But my "'V |,.(il thinking on it would be that 'its ,.N should let the boys stay home. If t* \,i,.s go, they will be photographed, * S j,„| the satellite countries will have taje pictures promoted by way of (Continued on ptl&e' ^ Facts Forum News, August. " I *f,"U,i
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