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Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 037. 1956-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 30, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1436.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-08). Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 037. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1436

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 037, 1956-08, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 30, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1436.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date August 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 037
Transcript Now that we have failed with our propaganda operations in Europe, we are going to transfer to the Orient, where there is the highest degree of illiteracy in the world." "We've already spent $700 million for worthless propaganda," he charged. "Yet we're no better off now than the clay we spent the first dollar." * Better Job for $85 Billion Less Mr. Castle outlined six ideas which be felt would save- the taxpayers of mis country $85 billion dollars, ancl at "ie same time do a better job for us abroad. "First," he said, "the USIA should be abolished. Its essential func- oons should be placed in the Department ol State where they were originally. We should have a Voice of America, of course, but it could be *dequately maintained, as the British Maintain a similar program, for about *15 million a year rather than requir- '"" a $100-million superstructure to justify it. Second, we should stop government-inspired crusades to make the *orld over in our image. They have 'ailed us completely, and thev will ^ntinue to fail us. third, make the educational film Project self-supporting. There are no Him giveaways with Britain - there mould be none with us. Tbe govern- rjenl already has enough educational j*Uns to last for ten years. An educa- "nial director from one of our visual Instruction departments should be put 'n charge as the British have done "h their program, and we will get .°"ie value out of it, instead of annoy- lng people with little movie trucks filing all over the world. Fourth, we should stop making °bots out of our ambassadors. It is l('ir sworn duty to answer anv- lies °'d about us; and if that is done '"Peilv at the local level we can get "°al value out of it which we are not Setting, Fifth, the Commerce Department's , ective participation in foreign trade ,^'rs should be encouraged. And the ^lA propagandists should be kept *ay bom this legitimate effort. s, And finally, the State Department ( '""'il include a four-page leaflet with ery passport issued. More than half J 'Hillion were issued last year to ,'lV('h'ng Americans, urging them to foreigners the truth about our >Urv mil our peaceful motives. H, ere is no belter way to disseminate fr6 truth, gentlemen, than to get it "" people to people." Mr. Castle was asked by Mr. O'Con nor why, if he disapproves of the USIA because he felt its officials did not have the proper news background, does he think the program would be in better hands in the State Department. "For one thing," replied Mr. Castle, "I think the problem today with the USIA is that it is trying to do too many things in too many ways to too many people. It could be improved if you put this thing in the State Department and select a new crew. Make no mistake about that — you'd need selected men with news ability, preferably men who have had training with the wire services and who know the impact of news upon foreign people. Those men should be put in charge of a good Voice of America modeled, if you please, after the British program. Do you know that today Moscow is not jamming the British (the BBC) program, but they are jamming us?" Straight News Gets Through "It seems to me," interjected Moderator Hiirleigh, "that if they are jamming our programs, we must — in the minds of Moscow — be more effective, or thev wouldn't bother to kill it." Mr. Castle pointed out that our program has been labeled propaganda by the British, by the Russians, and brothers, whereas the broadcasts of BBC are recognized as news programs. "You can call it by a nicer word, if you wish, but it's propaganda, nevertheless," insisted Mr. Hurleigh. "We want to put our best foot forward. Although you think our broadcasts aren't good and that changes should be made, yet the Soviets are jamming them. Why do you feel that we should copy the British, who must not be doing too good a job in the eyes of Moscow, since they are letting their stuff come through?" "Mr. Hurleigh, it is a known fact," replied Mr. Castle, "that before the war, during the war, and since, the BBC has been the most informative news broadcast to Foreigners." Mr. Prina brought up the point that a question of "selling" was involved here, and that does not always come under the category of news. "All right," insisted Mr. Castle. "If vou are going to do a selling job, then you'd better start to get some ambassadors who can do the job. When we had Jesse Isadore Strauss, when we had Kennedy in London — there was no question in the minds of the people iu the countries to which we sent those men as to who we were." "Hasn't the problem become a much greater one," asked Mr. Prina, "in view of recent Soviet penetrations? For example — aren't they pulling all stops in the Middle East with their propaganda?" "Well, let's look at it this way," Mr. Castle replied. "There are all sorts of approaches to the thing; but in the final analysis — and there is no mistake about this — our dear allies and the so-called neutralists have left the cold war to the United States and the Soviet Union. It has become a shouting war between us. "Now, I think," he continued, "that President Eisenhower had a wonderful opportunity when Bulganin offered him that phony peace proposition for 20 years to have said, 'Let's stop all propaganda.' In that way he could have 'put the bee' of stopping propaganda on the Soviets. This shouting is not going to win." Mr. Castle mentioned that Kent Cooper, who was the head of the Associated Press for 25 years, has solemnly warned in his recent book, The Right to Know, that government-inspired and government-circulated propaganda has pushed the United States into two world wars, and that unless curbed it would drag us perhaps prematurely and unnecessarily into a third world war. "We are overdoing this propaganda thing," reiterated Mr. Castle. "There is no country in the world that has better press services. No country in the world has more magazine distribution. The Readers Digest alone is printed in twelve different languages." Mr. Prina asked, "Do you think that the more we put into this propaganda effort, the more we lose in influence and friendship in the world?" Must Earn, Not Buy, Friends Mr. Castle stated that the answer to that was obvious. "You can use simple arithmetic. When we spent $20 million a year — and that was only a decade ago — we enjoyed greater prestige, and we had more friends throughout the world than we do today. Now we are going to spend $140 million for a job that we did better for $20 million. It is not a question of money. It is a question of brains, experience, ability — and of restraint. "Mr. Castle, you recommend abolishing USIA," interjected Mr. O'Connor, "and you made the statement earlier that this country should stop trying to make over the world. Aren't you afraid that if we stop, the Soviets v' *s Fori m News, August, 1956 Page 35
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