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Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 036. 1956-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 5, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1435.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-08). Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 036. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1435

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 036, 1956-08, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 5, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1435.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date August 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 036
Transcript !j 11 appearing iii May, as a taxpayer, /\ before the Senate Appropria- J. \.tions Subcommittee, Mr. Eu- gene Castle, well-known author and U. S. information specialist during two wars, leveled sharp criticism at the expenditures and overseas operations of the U. S. Information Agency. Penetrating questions were directed at Mr. Castle when he appeared as a guest on a recent Reporters' Roundup radio program. Questioners were Mr. L. Edgar Prina, Senate correspondent of the Washington Evening Star, and Mr. Donald O'Connor, Washington correspondent of the Detroit Times. Although the areas in which their opinions were at variance were not stressed, the impression was given that these seasoned newsmen did not subscribe in toto to Mr. Castle's analyses. According to Mr. Castle, a more efficient propaganda campaign could be conducted if the informational activities now dealt with by the USIA were returned to the State Department, which has in the past been responsible for the dissemination of all news regarding United States government policy. Robert F. Hurleigh, Mutual commentator ancl director of Washington operations, who moderated the discussion, stated, "American policy-makers admit reluctantly that the Communists are making substantial progress in their propaganda campaign to win and influence people all over the world. And they admit privately that they wish they could say the same thine; about the United States. Some Page 34 Reporters' Roundup Guest EUGENE CASTLE Discusses PRESS, PROMOTION, and PROPAGANDA IN THE U.S. INFORMATION AGENCY "We have already spent $700 million for worthless propaganda. Yet we're no better off now than the day we spent the first dollar," charges Mr. Castle. The basis for his criticism is closely questioned during this half-hour discussion. advisers warn that the Soviet Union has succeeded in taking the lead in promoting communism in the court of world opinion and urge a complete reappraisal of the administration's United States Information Agency." Mr. O'Connor pointed out that serious criticism of the United States is often heard abroad, which has led to such charges as Mr. Castle's that our propaganda activities are having, if anything, an adverse effect. "Can you tell me, Mr. Castle," he asked, "how it could be that our propaganda abroad is having an adverse effect when we are spending millions ancl millions of dollars yearly to publicize the 'good things about this democracy?" "First of all, we have the greatest news services in the world," replied Mr. Castle. "They not only serve the papers in the United States, but also the papers of the leading cities of the world. And this propaganda, which we have been increasing by millions year after year, is not helping us — but is hurting." Asked whether he favored abolishing propaganda altogether, or would merely change it into "sort of a government news service," Mr. Castle emphasized that a good press agent never reveals his hand as a press agent. "Why, I have in my office in New York," he related, "a file containing three or four hundred handouts that USIA has fed to the press services and to the world. And in the opening paragraph of each is the pronouncement that 'the United States Information Agency ancl Director Theodore Strei- bert suggest' — or 'say' — and so on. This should be done anonymously, if at all, through our ambassadors. We should have able press representatives in every ministry and embassy throughout the world, disseminating legitimate news. If we put a feeling of legitimacy into this, people in foreign countries will believe us. You must realize that Hitler, Mussolini, and Stalin have propagandized people to death under a government label — and now Khrushchev and Bulganirj are doing it. It's beneath the dignity of the United States. After all, it is the duty of every U. S. ambassador to interpret the policies of the United States. Let them do it, so that Mr. Dulles can stay home and run his State Department." Mr. Prina pointed out that if ambassadors were to carry this job of countering Soviet propaganda and distortions of the truth, in addition to painting a picture of life in the United States ancl all we stand for — it would be only a shoe-string program, based upon the amount of time ambassadors could spend in this manner. "How did we become the greatest nation in the world before there was a USIA?" countered Mr. Castle, pointing out that our ambassadors bad done a fine job for us in the past. "We're overdoing this thing now, he continued, "ancl in doing it we are making people suspicious. We are be- ing called warmongers. And to support it we are going to spend $140 million a year on foreign propaganda. Facts Forum News, August, 1956 CVp
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