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Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 030. 1956-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. May 30, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1429.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-08). Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 030. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1429

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 030, 1956-08, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed May 30, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1429.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date August 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 030
Transcript On I Pr Views of Proponents of The Langer Amendment This is the only recent major proposal for election change which makes provision for a national primary. Tbe sponsor of this amendment explains his views by saying, in reference to the Daniel-Mundt compromise amendment: .... The proposed amendments are entirely unsatisfactory hecause they do not abolish the convention method of selecting candidates for President and Vice President. In other words, the old system of the politicians meeting in smoke-filled rooms and hand-picking these candidates will continue unless my substitute is adopted. Frankly, there is no reason why the people should not have the right in primary election to select their candidates on the Republican ancl Democratic tickets, just as they now vote in primary elections for United States senators, congressmen, governors, and other state officials. Most of the listeners in 1952 on television saw how in hoth Republican and Democratic conventions the politicians selected the candidates, and the universal feeling of disgust that emanated from actually seeing these conventions in operation has mounted during the last three years.10 A direct election with a direct primary, says Senator Langer, would be a terrific incentive for all eligible voters to vote, for they would feel that each vote would count — not only in the final election, but in the choice of candidates. When asked if he thought provision for a run-off should be included in case a candidate did not receive a majority vote, the sponsor of this plan explained that such a step would not be necessary. The proposal provides that in order to be recognized a political party must have a petition signed by 5 per cent of the voters. It would be possible for a third partv- to enter a candidate, but it would be extremely difficult, and more difficult still for this candidate to receive enough votes to split appreciably the strength of the two major parties. This procedure would also certainly dispose of the troublesome possibility of election of a minority President, it was pointed out. Arguments Against the Langer Amendment The primary argument, again, against the Langer amendment is that a direct election would completely erase state lines, even more so than would the previously discussed Humphrey plan. The senators were reminded, again, that this nation is still a fed- tressional Record. March 27. 1956, p. 5025. Page 28 WIDE WORLD PHOTO The amendment offered by Senator William Longer (R-N.D.I using the direct vote method also provided for a national presidential primary. eration of states, a republic, and that the states should maintain their identities, even in a national election. Another main point of disagreement is whether or not small states would be giving up, or would want to give up, the advantage they have today in the present division of electoral votes. Senator Daniel of Texas, the largest state, was certain that an amendment of this nature would never be approved by a sufficient number of legislatures throughout the country to be adopted as part of the Constitution. There are 30 or 31 states which have an electoral vote on the basis of their two senators, plus their representatives in Congress, giving them a little more than the proportional amount of votes they would have in a nationwide election. Senator John O. Pastore of Rhode Island, the smallest state in the Union, savs the people in small states do not necessarily want to retain the unit vote method. He said: I believe in popular elections. 1 believe the President represents all the people, that lie is not the President ot the states, hut is the President of the people of the United States. I have never heard anyone in a small state lament the fact that, if wc had popular elections, thev would lose power. I do not think it is a question of power; it is a question ot democratic principle." The question of who would pay the expenses of the national primary was raised, and Senator Langer answered •'Ibid., i). 3032. that each candidate, together with bis friends, would bear campaign costs, and the state governments would pay other necessary expenses. Others thought that Congress should bear election expense. These provisions are not specifically made in the amendment, and this omission was criticized, even though the sponsor felt that such measures could be added by the House of Representatives, after passage by the Senate, or added in conference. The requirement for each voter to register with a political party also met with criticism, since several smal' states do not have that requirement at present, and apparently do not want to adopt it. The Langer amendment was rejected. Conclusion After several days of debate in the Senate and after the various proposals had been thoroughly aired, the concensus seemed to be that though n° amendment bad passed, progress haf still been made. Senator Willi;'"1 Knowland summed it up in this state- ment: I think the discussion which has take'1 place has been beneficial to the Scn.it1' and has brought the issue before the con"' try. While it may he that there is no singh' amendment which has as yet been proposed that coulcl secure tie necessary two- thirds vote, I think the debate and tin' discussion on hoth sides of the aisle he1' indicated that there arc far more til'"1 two-thirds of the total membership of tne Senate who believe there should he so"11-' change in Ihe present outmoded system (" electing, through the electoral college, tW President of the United States/' Is the electoral college obsolete? L" big-city minority groups receive su"' stantial concessions in election car" paigns? If you favor a direct VOjfl would you also favor a direct nation*" primary? Does your vote really couB Vital questions raised need to In thoroughly digested and carol"' -, weighed before the issue of electiif' reform comes up again. Keep ' formed; then lei vour congress"1'1 know your views. " llttrc Yt,n voted in the Fact3 Forum Poll ott paste 64? Result* of this monthly poll are mailetl to congressmen, ncivspapcrs. at"' radio stations all over the nation- Facts Forum News, Aug „st, 1$ S'W no on Srta > si >ait Nern ieds °i >Ha, >bc i,r'"itl, b *^SI
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