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Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
File 029
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 029. 1956-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 27, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1428.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-08). Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 029. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1428

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 029, 1956-08, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 27, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1428.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date August 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 029
Transcript (5) A simple plurality would be necessary for election. (6) In case of a tie for highest Place, the President would be elected by the House of Representatives, with each member casting one vote: the Vice President would be selected by the Senate. Arguments for the Humphrey Amendment The same reasons for abolition of the electoral college were given as aave been presented elsewhere, mainly that it is a practice made obsolete ^rth the development of political Parties. The first Humphrey amendment *0uld completely obliterate state lines >n regard to the election of the President and Vice President; the substitute amendment, however, endeavors *° combine the principle of direct rep- "vntation with that of federal representation, by providing for a direct v°te, but awarding two extra state v"tes to the candidate gaining a majority in each particular state. The sponsors of the direct vote *?ethod contend that the President *0d Vice President are our onlv na- 'finally elected officers, ancl therefore oeir election should be based upon a Rational constituency, without regard 0 congressional districts and state bo'indaries. ' be two extra votes awarded the •*ndidates who carry a state by popu- llr vote give recognition to the federal Principle — a prize not so large as to "'r out of proportion the popular 111 of the people, yet significant n°ugh to warrant considerable effort 2? the part of both major parties. ,nird parties would be discouraged 'rnply as a matter of the natural laws °* competition. , « this system of electoral counting had "'I' operative in three recent presidential Actions - 1944, 1948, ancl 1952 - most "ie states would have been carried hy ml'"W enou8n margins by one or the .''" r party to make tlie two-vote prize '"l><irtant."' "lost important, according to the "tlio,- of this proposal, the Humphrey an- Would encourage popular partici- ^"c-n in presidential elections, be- l^lse it would penalize states with a j* turnout and reward those with a la I mrnout- In many states, particu- lv one-party states, voters repre- j nting the minority party have little ^"nation to go to the polls, for the "' system would capture the entire Up congressional Record, March 22, 1856, p. 4769. AfTs Forum News, Augtw*, 1956 state electoral vote with little effort. Another advantage of this system, according to Senator Humphrey, is that it would lead to a strengthening of the national organizations of our political parties. Such strengthening would be necessary because a nationally coordinated campaign would be essential if either party were to obtain as large a part of the 435-vote block as The direct vote for presidential elections was endorsed by Senator Hubert Humphrey (D-Minn.) and others in the Senate debates on electoral reform. , possible. Increasing facilities of radio, television, and press are helping to make each candidate a national candidate, and would lend this advantage to the establishment of a more evenly distributed campaign. Disadvantages of the Humphrey Amendment The most common objection to the Humphrey amendment, as well as to any other plan for a direct vote, is that il has verv little chance of enactment, at least in the immediate future. Even the proponents of the popular vote recognize the improbability of its adoption any time soon, but continue to present it from time to time in order to keep the idea alive and before the public. The reason for their doubts as to the acceptance of such a plan — but not the merits — is that the entire concept of a federal republic would be eliminated from presidential elections, and far from the thirty-two states necessary for ratification of such an amendment are in favor of and' ready for such a drastic change. The Humphrey amendment, however, endeavors to incorporate some vestiges of the federal principle by providing for two votes to be awarded a candidate who carries a state by plurality popular vote. Under the present system, and under district or proportional vote plans, the states administer their own elections and determine their own voting qualifications. With a nationally coordinated election involving the direct vote, either the federal government would have to regulate the elections, or the states would continue to vary widely in such requirements as the minimum voting age. Federal intervention in a state function is widely considered undesirable. The second Humphrey amendment was thoroughly discussed as a serious compromise of various proposals previously made ancl as a substitute for S. J. Res. 31. It was, however, rejected. The Langer Amendment Following the disposal of the Humphrey amendment, Senator Langer offered another plan calling for a direct election. In substance this method would include: (1) The official candidates for President and Vice President would be nominated at a primary election by direct vote. (-2) No person would be a candidate for nomination except in the primary of the party of his affiliation. (3) A political party would not be recognized as such unless it had registered members representing at least 5 per cent of the total registered voters in the United States for four years prior to a national election. (4) The electoral college would be abolished. (5) The President and Vice President would be elected by direct popular vote, with a simple plurality necessary for election. (6) In case of a tie, the House of Representatives would select the President, or the Senate would select the Vice President, with a majority vote being necessary. (7) The states would prescribe their own election requirements, but Congress could by law alter such regulations. Page 27 fs ina: I
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