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Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 017. 1956-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1416.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-08). Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 017. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1416

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 017, 1956-08, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1416.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date August 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 017
Transcript the traditions of freedom in this country, and there are many who will agree. Senator Herbert H. Lehman (D- N.Y.), in a statement before the Senate Judiciary Subcommittee on Immigration and Naturalization, November 22, 1955, said that the Walter-McCarran Act adopted most of the worst features of old laws and added new evils. He stated, further, that the Act isolated the country rather than protected it, for it could be taken for granted 'hat those subversives who were determined to enter the United States *ouItl be resourceful enough to enter through either Mexico or Canada.3 On the other hand those who would "' desirable citizens are prevented bom entering the country. Opponents of the Walter-McCarran Af-'t claim that citizenship by naturalization can be too easily taken away bom the "side-door" citizen; he can be toreed to forfeit it for any one of a lumber of reasons. Therefore, the dis- t'rietion is too great between native- ^>rn and naturalized citizens. A false premise of the Walter-McCarran Act is that all immigrants are Potential Communists and subversives unti] proved otherwise. This, of °°urse, is in contradiction to the long- established tradition in this country ^at one is innocent of wrongdoing ""til proved guilty. Proponents of the Walter-McCarran ^ct have another argument against "y "new look" in liberality, immigra- "Ori-wise; they hold that increased ""migration would threaten the econ- ?ty of the country by affecting wages the native-born. Opponents of the j*et state that this argument has no as's in fact, because if it did, labor rRanizations would not favor a lib- al immigration policy, which most 0f them do. 'hose persons who favor a more lib- . a' immigration policy claim that if ./""igration ever begins to endanger e American economy, the shut-off °uld be practically automatic. When . jobs are available, immigrants j, ^er do not come or do not stay. "ring the depression of the 1930s 0re immigrants left this countrv than anle into it. a Another thing to bear in mind is q,"1' many American citizens, because (, Carriage or other reasons, leave the ?'ted States each year ancl move to "tl, fr countries. Act °PPonents of the Walter-McCarran Act is archaic and in need of a facelifting. Even those who favor the Act are agreed, for the most part, that some changes might prove beneficial. The Act contains provisions which burden international transportation companies. Designed primarily to protect citizens from dangerous aliens, under certain conditions the law imposes fines and penalties on steamship lines and airlines. For example, if an alien misrepresents his eligibility to enter the country and is admitted temporarily, the carrier is made responsible. It must pay for many expenses, say it is no great secret that the Senator Herbert H. Lehman (D-N.Y.1, above, stated that the Walter-McCarran Act has isolated this country rather than protected it. in addition to the return fare of the alien. And this applies, even il an alien has been given permission to enter the country by the State Department, already has his visa, and has been approved by the Immigration Service. Still, the carrier can be fined as much as $1,000 for bringing him.4 The carrier must, in addition, furnish office space and facilities for the Immigration Service, even though the Service is performing a public function. Under the present law foreigners who come to this country for temporary visits are required to meet the same tests as those coming as permanent immigrants. This, of course, necessitates considerable work. The President, in a state of the Union message, recommended that temporary visitors be subjected to modified requirements.9 ').,,, '84 CongreMiono! Record (1936), p. 1412. ■ihiil . p. 1299. Acfs Forum News, August, 1956 President Eisenhower's opposition to the Act is one of long standing. Holding that the Act is discriminatory, he has asked that the number of persons allowed to come into this country each year be based on the 1950 rather than the 1920 census. Also, he favors a flexibility of quotas, so that if anv one country does not utilize its quota, another may be able to do so. For example, unused quotas for Great Britain, Austria, or Germany might be apportioned to Italy or Greece.6 President Eisenhower stated that the United States has always welcomed immigrants to its shores. In his message the President said: Experience in the postwar world demonstrates that the present national-origins method of admitting aliens needs to be reexamined, and a new system adopted which will admit aliens within allowable numbers according to new guidelines and standards.7 Representative Torbert H. Mac- Donald (D-Mass.) remarked that the immigration laws needed thorough re- vision, that the time had come to stop shadow-boxing on such a vital issue. He held that it was in the best interests of the country for the Walter- McCarran Act to be abolished and replaced by one without national or racial bias.8 The present law states, in actuality, that an Englishman or a German i.s welcome in this country, but that a Greek, Italian, etc., is not. This, naturally, is an un-American concept This is judging a man by his nationality rather than by his individual worth." Communists have pounced on this like a hungry dog on a bone, using it as propaganda against America. For this law says, in effect, that for biological reasons all immigrants are "equal," but that some are more equal than others. In other words some can enter the United States only if they are from an "approved" country. This, opponents of the Act claim, is reminiscent of Hitlerism. America has always represented multiple cultures. It is this plurality which lends color and variety to the great national scene. If America is to remain the bright and shining symbol of freedom, justice, and equality, if it is to avoid the patina of bigotry and suspicion, it necessarily follows that unfair and archaic laws must be amended. Terror-stricken inhabitants, shrouded in (Continued on page 54) •Ibid., p. A7S1. ■11,1,1 . p. 1998. >lbid., p. A751. ""America's Racist Intminralion Law," the San Froncfeco Cull-llullitin. January 16, 1956. Page 15 n
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