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Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
File 016
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 016. 1956-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1415.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-08). Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 016. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1415

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 016, 1956-08, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1415.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date August 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 016
Transcript B „l i V ill On I tr< oppressed. Former President Truman said that the national-origins system "breathes prejudice" against the foreign born, and that it shows racial and religious discrimination. Others label the Act as hysterical legislation which was rushed through Congress; also, that the Act is both reactionary, Fascist, and racist.1 They claim, further, that passage of the Act marked a new high in American bigotry and narrowmindedness. They charge that never before were there so many barriers to immigration, and that never before were so many reasons given as grounds for deportation of many Americans who were foreign born. Senators Lehman, Humphrey, Morse, Kefauver, Moody, Benton, and Douglas led a fight against the original bill, ancl they were able to force acceptance of 21 amendments before the bill passed through the Senate by a vote of 44 to 28. The objections to the Walter-McCarran Act are many. For one thing, a foreign-born American can have his citizenship taken away and he deported if it is proved that he once belonged to a subversive movement, no matter if he is a perfectly good American at present. Moreover, the Act puts native-horn Americans abroad in danger of loss of citizenship without so much as a hearing. The Act expands the powers of immigration officials, consuls, and the attorney general. The opinions of these people are basis enough for exclusion or deportation, without benefit of a judicial review. Under the Act political and religious refugees may be deported, and the Act reduces further immigration of such people. Additionally, the Act is responsible for many obstacles to international travel for citizens and non-citizens alike. A large number of organizations have, from the beginning, opposed the Walter-McCarran Act. and have carried on a running fight to have it repealed. Many such organizations are religious or racial groups, together with most of the merged CIO-AFL labor groups. Opponents of the Walter-McCarran Act claim that the national-origins svs- tem, as an immigration policy, has been responsible for much resentment against the United States in foreign '"Corralling the Trojan Horse Called Immigration," Don Bell Reports (bulletin). May 18, 1956. Page 14 Former President Truman, who said that the national-origins quota system "breathes prejudice against the foreign born, and is the embodiment of racial and religious discriminations." countries. Also, they state that such a policy refutes the oft-heard cry of equality of opportunity for all peoples in America, regardless of race, creed, or color. To many the Walter-McCarran Act represents a philosophy of fear and distrust of foreigners abroad and aliens within. So long as this situation exists, America cannot in truth be regarded as a haven for the oppressed. Furthermore, as things stand now, many potentially valuable immigrants are prevented from ever reaching flic shores of America. So, in the thinking of many Americans, the Walter-McCarran Act is a monument to the inconsistency between words and deeds. Most proponents of the Act justify their positions on the basis of national security. The Act, in short, makes it difficult for foreigners to enter America, and makes it easy to deport those who have entered. Also, these proponents spend a great deal of their time discrediting opponents of the present immigration policy, charging them as being dupes of the Communists. If the above is true, many persons of prominence must be so labeled. Opponents of the Act claim that it is a familiar method of attack to label as Communists, Socialists or leftists those who do not agree with the policies of any given side. Departing from the political aspects for a time, and considering only the historical, it must be remembered that America was settled by refugees in the beginning, by persecuted people and by those who wanted to start a fresh life in a new land. They wanted religious and political freedom. As the trickle from abroad became a steady stream, there came the English, Germans, French, Irish, Jews, Czechs, Italians, Greeks, Poles, and Serbs — potential Americans all. These people helped populate a country which has become the wealthiest most productive nation in the world- Immigrants have been responsible for many accomplishments. The building of transcontinental railroads in the nineteenth century was accomplished only through the help of Chinese and Irish immigrants. Farms were cut out of the wilderness by Scandinavian an'' German immigrants. And great caster'1 factories are presently being run 9, large part by immigrants and their children — representing many races. During times of war immigrants have always been in the thick of tin' fight with our armies. And not one have they contributed muscle and bravery, but brain-power as well. l'nl" migrants have made names for then1' selves in all fields of endeavor." Taking the above into consider11' tion, would it not be acceptable, aS well as humanitarian, to welcome today those people who are fleeing froO1 tyrrany in their native countries? Th* is not to say that everyone should '" welcomed with open arms, for thefl are those who would like to destrO! the American system of government" murderers, thieves, and subversive* Immigrants should be both limit1'1' and screened, of course. But on tnf other hand it would seem that tH system should not preclude entraiie into this country of those men of gi"' intellectual stature, or those men *"** are exceptionally gifted — scientist*' musicians, educators, artists, OT others. For example, where would Ainc'1'' be today if it were not for those scic" tists who fled from persecution ■', home and came to America, son"' ■ them ultimately to assist in produd ■id the nuclear weapons which helpy, this country to win World War ' What would have happened if ol', enemies in that war had posse**1, these skilled men and, as a matter course, the nuclear weapons? It has been said that some pr"\ sions of the present immigration P" icy are more closely related to i-'°" nuinistie philosophies than they are ""Should Basic Chanees He Made in U. S. ""J!,, . gration Policy?" Congressional linnet (J811 19S6), i>. 24. Facts Forum News, August, 19* the tr, try, ii agree. Sen: N.Y.), ate Ju, grah'oi 22, 19; fan Ac hires c He sti lated t ed it, f that th mined *ould throng Ont be <!(., from e Opp Act cla ?ation from tl forced "umbe "'ICtioi born a A fa Carran Potenti until course ■Stablis «at o, u"til pi A« ha S-Wi: ""'nigr Orny0f 1 *e A« sta basis ir 0rSaniz y fan oftherr Thosi 6ri>l in, Sign the Arr ,v°uld 1 1 >'o° D her < 0a*te in ..Anotl «> I "larri nuited °,hcren v?pp0 ^t Say V, b AcTs F
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