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Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 015. 1956-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 5, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1414.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-08). Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 015. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1414

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 015, 1956-08, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 5, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1414.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date August 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 015
Transcript Organizations endorsed it. Opposition lo the Act came for the most part from the American Committee for the Protection of the Foreign Born and the National Lawyers' Guild. As a Point of fact, both of these organizations have been cited as Communist- front organizations.7 In a report to the American Committee for Protection of Foreign Born in 1954, one Abner Green remarked 'hat a movement for repeal of the Act had the help of a hundred organizations in as many as fifteen states. These organizations, Green let it be known, operated for the purpose of carrying out the Communist party line ln regard to immigration.8 Supporters of the Act claim that Pink" and "liberal" organizations with a'l their criticisms and accusations, nave led many people to believe that "ie Act is un-American, when, really, tile opposite is true. Attacks in the press come principally from the Daily Worker and the People's Daily World. These are the bvo leading newspapers of the Com- "lunist Party. However, when Confess overrode the veto and made the V'alter-McCarran Act a public law, c'arnpaigns against the Act were started by not only the Daily Worker, but also bv the New York Times, New J?rk Herald Trihune and others.9 Critics of these newspaper campaigns Jteted that the usual approach was the "yper-emotional drivel"1 about disinclination, about suspicion toward " and bigotry toward some. In Congress the Act was opposed by 'left-wing coterie, among which were ' enators Humphrev of Minnesota and ^hman of New'York. William F. . eirnlich charged in an article appear- n£ in American Mercury that they ere for opening all the gates to an alr,lost unrestricted flood of aliens." One of the most amazing things °ut the present immigration contro- y**y is the fact that the "good fiends" of labor are all for relaxing ^frictions on immigration. Those avoring our present restricted policy ty that this influx of cheap labor 0,dd hinder rather than help Ameri- ,?? labor. Senator Walter F. George a, ~Ga.), in a speech on the floor of ^5 Senate, May 22, 1952, stated he >.P.5, fieji ^""illratinn: America's Trojan Horse," Don (."epon., (bulletin), December SO, I1!"."- 4d( '. H- Matthews, "Immigraton: 1956 Issue," ►\!*c'"i Mercury (October, 1955). "migration: America's Trojan Horse," op. cit. H,i,l ^otes Mliain F. Heimlich, "Immigration Visas for ' Hie American Mercury (February, 19.56). b ACTs Forum Nkws, August, 1956 believed in restrictions on immigration in the interest of the American worker. Individuals who are satisfied with the present legislation state that anything more than a perfunctory examination of the Walter-McCarran Act will disclose it to be fair and impartial, a law fashioned by experts. These experts had no axe to grind; they were interested in preserving and protecting the American way of life. On the other hand, claim the proponents of our present law, the groups who work day and night to destroy the Act, if only by attrition, are the Reds, the pinks, the misguided, and the professional promoters and politicians who would denude the American eagle of feathers in a swap for minority-bloc votes. It is charged that such groups do not speak .specifically when maligning the Act. They are accused of employing tergiversation and utilizing the old emotional "hokum" that has been successful for decades. Using this tried-and-true approach, they speak of discrimination and racism. They are charged with concocting and disseminating propaganda, and, under the guise of humanitarianism, of organizing pressure groups. Persons who support the present law claim that the left-wing proposal of open-door immigration, with its resulting political control, could not keep from becoming a veritable carnival of fraud, pressures and corruption. They claim that immigration would be a political football, to be kicked by unscrupulous political aspirants. Such politicians might promise minority blocs that if they voted right, immigration doors would open magically to friends in distant lands — this at the expense of other countries. Visas for votes would be the result.12 It has been charged that the one- vvorlders are satisfied with making a "circus" out of the Walter-McCarran Act controversy. While they seem content with pointing out the deficiencies of the Act and its "inhuman" humaneness, in the background they are working hard to have immigration controlled on an international basis.13 Proponents of the Walter-McCarran Act warn patriots not to be deceived. They state that tbe knife is being sharpened, and through immigration the subversives are hoping to slice some collective throats. These supporters of the present law claim that the entire ethnic and cultural composition of the nation could be altered by the influx of a "controlled" people into the country. This, they say, is Unreal conspiracy behind a proposed loosening of immigration restrictions. Many who favor making no change in the present system say that the Communists are in business at the same old stand; that the product is the same — only the label is different. They warn that America can be inundated by a Red tide of immigration. They plead that it is the eleventh hour, that the danger is real, and that if the immigration policy is changed. the country will be in need, not onlv of a modern Horatius at the bridge, but of a Paul Bunyan finger for the leaky immigration dike. • **•••••***••••••••••••*•*•• Presented below are views of those who propose a change in the present immigration policy ******•***•*** + **•**** + ***** I i America is to remain a citadel of freedom, if it is to continue to be known throughout the world as a haven for the oppressed, then there must be changes in the immigration policy as reflected today by the Walter-McCarran Immigration Act." Thus say many persons, including a number of national legislators. Those native-born citizens who cry that a relaxation of tbe present immigration policy would result in an "open sesame" for Socialists and Communists might be considered by some to be alarmists. It is pardonable, per haps, that in such perilous times there are always some who will breathe clean air and smell smoke — or, more aptly, perhaps, who see every signal light in immigration traffic as red. President Eisenhower has stated that the Walter-McCarran Act should be rewritten, and that a better law should be written that would strike an unbigoted balance between the welfare of the country and the "prayerful hopes" of the homeless and ""Corralling the Trojan Horse Called Immigration," Dim Hill Reports (bulletin), May 18, 1956. n I \ Page 13
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