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Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 013. 1956-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1412.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-08). Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 013. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1412

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956 - File 013, 1956-08, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1469/show/1412.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol.5, No. 8, August 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date August 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 013
Transcript novv makes possible the supervision and deportation of literally thousands of aliens Against whom final warrants of deportation have heen issued hut who, for one reason or another, were undeportable . , , because 't retains the national origins quota system ■ • , because all racial discrimination has peen removed from our immigration laws 'n a very realistic manner.' Daughters of the American Revolution are also aware of the threat posed t° the country, and urge patriots to °Ppose weakening amendments which ""gilt destroy the Immigration Act.4 The Walter-McCarran Act covers f-0 pages, and has 307 separate sections. President Truman vetoed the D1", but Congress passed it over his Mo by 278 to 113 in the House, and Dy 57 to 26 in the Senate. Parentheti- ?"'y, both authors of the Act were "Wnocrats. And, since it was passed over a Truman veto, it seems, general- v> to have bipartisan favor. 't has been charged that the Act is hysterica] legislation that was "rushed" '"rough Congress." It cannot, in truth, <Je charged as "hysterical," for almost y'o years of hearings, of study, and of "^ estimation and intense research . er>t into the making of this basic ^migration law. Dealing with both ■"migration and naturalization, it repents a recodification of all the ~lmigration laws. The time spent on His legislation is said to have been tbe ''n'srcst ever devoted to any single bit p legislation in all the history of ""Kress. 'he Departments of State and Jus- °e were the two agencies responsible r administering the immigration and turalization laws. Therefore, they rrir' ft .. ade up committees to give help to le Preparation of the Act. The Act ,,er>t through six entire revisions. All 6 hundreds of immigration enact- ^rifs were made into a single law. , "°t onlv did the Departments of j s"ce and State favor the bill in its j ai form, but it was also viewed with 4v°r by the Central Intelligence er)cy. It is a matter of record that »0 government agency opposed it. ^"emios of the Act maintain that it oth reactionary and Fascist. Propo- ,..n's of the Act say that it is the most eral of laws. lib, —>«i ot laws. For instance, racial s are removed. Countries of Asia { Riven quotas based on the same n. "la as the one for European Th*"'65' L "e Act sets a limit of approximate- '54,000 immigrants who can be c°ngr<M<anai n,-i-or,l (1958), p. A2767. """Ci"1'1 "'"''' Changes Be Made in U. S. Immi- t„ ' Policy?" „,,. cit.. p. 31. '"""••■nt.itivf Francis E. Walter, op. ott., p- 2. ^s Forum News, August, 1956 admitted to this country in any one year. This is divided into nationality quotas, which are based on the census of 1920. The Act is very hard on Communists, criminals, and subversives. Granted, the existing law does require careful examination of those persons' entering the country. Rut ask those who uphold the Act — is it not better to inconvenience the thousands of aliens who enter than to endanger the millions of citizens who reside here? No foreigner has any inherent right to come to this country. After all, these same proponents ask, what is the use of having laws if they are not designed to protect the people of America? If enemies of the Walter-McCarran Representative Francis E. Walter (D-Penn.l, coauthor of the Walter-McCarran Act, who stoted that enemies of the Act didn't want to change it; rather, they wished to destroy it. Immigration Act have their way, the doors vvill be thrown open to the crowds of European Socialists and worse, claim those favoring the Act. They state that these people, drenched by socialistic ideology, would add to the already-mounting volume of Socialists' votes in the large industrial centers of the country. A provision of the Act, indicative of its liberality, is that alien wives, husbands, and children of United States citizens are now permitted to enter the country quota-free. The "trickle" of Immigrants has also been increased to a somewhat larger flow because of the provision for non-quota groups. This has increased the annual immigration total to approximately 200,000. The Act employs selectivity in the choice of immigrants. Its aim is to select those immigrants who most likely would be useful to the country and be integrated most easily into the American culture. The three categories set up are: first, relatives of American citizens; second, those of skilled or exceptional training; and, third, all others. Fifty per cent of each quota is reserved for the category of tbe skilled or exceptionally-trained. If less than fifty per cent of the skilled category apply, then the balance is absorbed by other categories. It has been charged that the Act precludes an important psychological weapon — namely, that of offering refuge to those people escaping from behind the Iron Curtain. However, it must be remembered that in West Germany alone there are ten million refugees from communism. In other countries of Europe there is probably an equal number. For the United States to attempt to absorb these people would be foolhardy. Not only would it not solve their problem, but it would create a problem at home. And this country has long since passed tbe point where it can observe unre- tricted immigration, which many opponents of the Walter-McCarran Immigration Act seem to be seeking. A complaint heard frequently is that tbe Act makes it possible to deport large numbers of "worthy" people, and that denaturalization is easy for naturalized citizens. These complaints are representative of the ammunition used by word-mongers when attacking the Immigration Act. There are good reasons for such restrictions as the above. The Act keeps out of tbe country aliens who might endanger public safety. Also, it makes it possible to deport aliens who engage in activities which endanger public safety. There are between three and five million aliens in the countrv illegally. Due to loopholes in the old law, deportation orders could not be enforced. For this reason, before the Walter-McCarran Act, hordes of foreign-born subversives and criminals walked the streets in this nation. A statistic unfamiliar to many is the percentage of Communist Party members who were foreign born. The fact is that 91.5 per cent were either foreign born, married to persons who were foreign born, or were born of foreign parents. Also, more than half of them traced their origins to Russia or to her satellites. That was one reason for creating the Act, to make it harder for aliens with objectionable Page 11 fs ing \
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