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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 7, August 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 7, August 1955 - File 056. 1955-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1399/show/1385.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-08). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 7, August 1955 - File 056. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1399/show/1385

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 7, August 1955 - File 056, 1955-08, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1399/show/1385.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 7, August 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date August 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 056
Transcript ;-':3 s: hemmed about by certain provisions which we thought would secure lhe interests nf the United States, as besl we could consistent with the over-all philos- ophy of having an international control in effect. I generally eun of the impression lhat Dr. Oppenheimer at that lime was as sensitive as I should say anyone weis in regard to the security interests e.f the I nited States. • • • . . . He was alert lo the necessity of protecting, insofar as it was possible to protect the interests of the United Slates. as I say. consistent with the concept of international control. . . . 1 At tlii- peeint in tbe- testimony McCloy described activities iei the' Soviet study group, of which he weis the presiding officer, and of which Dr. Oppenheimer was a member. He went on tei tell how Oppen- lie'ime'r went on a lecture tour abroad and pave the stei.lv group "a picture of where lie thoughl we stood generally in relation to tbe Seee iel in respect to atomic llevcl- npineait." 1 A. The impression that I gathered from him was one of real concern that although we bad ei quantitative superiority, that lhat didn't mean a great ileal. . . . We were coming to the point where vve mighl be. he used lhe graphic ex- pression "like two scorpions in a bottle," that each could destroy the other, even though one mav have been somewhat larger than the other, and he was very much concerned about tbe security position of llie United Slales. He pressed vigorously for lhe con- tinued activity in ihi- field and not letting down our guard, so to speak. Taking advantage nf any opportunity thai really presented itself ibat looked as if it weis substantial, but if there was lo be any negotiation, la- certain that wc were armed and well prepared before we went tn such a conference. Indeed. T have' the impression lhat he, with one or I wn others, wa- somewhat more, shall I sav. militant than some of the other members of the group. ... In the course of this. I think I should say thai he was questioned by lhe mem- leers eif lhe group from lime to time. In a number uf cases, In- refused to reply, saying thai hr could nul reply because in doing so thai would involve some security information. His talk was generally in generalities, tu some extent following the line thai he took in an article which I saw later nn. published in Foreign A/fairs. . . . Q. Based nn your acquaintance with Dr. Oppenheimer, and your experiences with him. would you give the board your opinion as in his loyalty and as to his security risk nr want of risk'.' \. In the first place, ju-t In gel it nut of the way, Id me seiv lhal then' i- nothing lhat occurred during the entire period uf my contact with Dr. Oppenheimer which gave me any reason to feel that he was in any sense disloyal to the United States. But I would want to put it more positively than that and also add tbat throughout my contacts with him, 1 got the impression, as one who has had a good bit of contact and experience with defense matters, that be was very sensitive to all aspects uf tbe security of the United States. I gathered the impression that he was deeply concerned about the consequences of this awful force tbat we bad released, anxious to do what be could toward seeing that it was not used or did not become a destroyer of civilization. He was somewhat puzzled as to what form lhat would take and still he consistent with the interests of the United Stales. . . . I can't be too emphatic as to my impression of Dr. Oppenheimer in this regard. I have lhe impression of bis being a loyal, patriotic citizen, aware of his responsibilities, and thai I want to accent. As lo his security risk—to use the current phrase—I again can slate that negatively certainly. I know of nothing myself which would make me feel lhal he weis a security risk. 1 don'l know just exactly what you mean by ;i security risk. I know lhat I am a security risk, and I think every individual is a security risk. You can always talk in your sleep, i mi i em always drop a paper lhat you should not drop, or you can speak to your wife about something, and lo that extent no human being is an absolutely secure person. I don'l suppose we eire talking about tbat. I never heard of any of Dr. Oppenheimer's early background until verv recently, and so thai has never been an element in my thinking. I have only thought of him as being a figure whom I feel I know, and I feel I eun simievvhat knowledgeable in this field, and one I feel I know is as much responsible as anybody else, if perhaps not more than einvl.eaelv else in this particular field of the weapon, for our pre-eminence in that field. • • • As I Irv lo look back to that period. I think vve would have taken pretty much anybody who had certainly lhe combination of those qualities—thc the- e.ieiieal ability, plus lhe practical sense. In advance our defense position in that field. In those days we were on guard eiiieeinsl the Nazis and the Germans. I think we would have grabbed one of them, if we thought he had that quality. eiml surrounded him with as much security precautions as we could. Indeed, I think we would heive probably taken a convicted murderer il he heul thai capacity. There again is ibis question nl the relative character uf security, ll depends somewhal on the day and nve thai you are in. I wani in emphasize particularly ibis affirmative side of it. The names we bandied about at lhal lime included a number of refugees and a number nf people that came from Europe. I have the impression I mav be wrong about it—but I have the impression thai a very large element of ibis theoretical thinking did emanate frnm lhe minds of those who immigrated to ibis country, and had nol been generated here as far as it had been in Europe. There were names like Fermi and Wigner and Teller. Rabi, another queer name. Szi- lard, or something like lhat—but I have lhe impression they came over here, and probably emhued wilh a certain anti- Nazi fervor which tended lo stimulate thinking, and il is lhal type of mind thai we certainly needed then. We could find, so to speak, practical atomic physicists, emd today there an' great quantities nf them being trained, and whether we are gelling this finch balanced imagination which can stretch beyond ihe practicalities uf ibis thing is to my mind lhe importanl aspect of this problem. The ail is still in its infancy, and we slill are in need of great imagination in ibis field. In a very real sense, therefore, I Ibink there is a security risk in reverse. If anything is done which would in any way repress nr dampen lhal fervor, lhal verve, thai enthusiasm, or lhe Feeling generally thai the place where vou can get tbe greatest opportunity fnr the expansion of your mind and your experiments in ibis field is thr United Slate-. to that extent the security of lhe United States is impaired. In other words, you can'l be too conventional aboul il or vou run into " security problem the other way. Wc are only secure if we have the besl brains and the besl reach of mind in this field. If the impression is prevalent lhal scientists as a whole have Iii work under such greal rest rid inns and perhaps great suspicion in the United States, we mav lose the nexl step in ihis field, which I ibink would be very dangerous feu us. • • • A. ... I have been eiskeel this recently in New York frequently: Do you think lhat Dr. Oppenheimer is a security risk, and how would I answer that? . . . What do you mean by security? Positive? Negative? There is a security risk both ways in this thing. It is the affirmative security thai I believe we musl protect here. I would seiv thai even if Dr. Of penheimer bad some connections tha' were siimi'whal suspicious or make' i""' fairly uneasy, you have to balance h'" affirmative aspeel againsl thai befol* vou can Finally conclude in your "W mind thai he is a reasonable securit) risk because there is a balance of he leresi there. . . . • • • V ... I will say thai as tar as I have had anv acquaintance with Dr. Oppei'' Page a I FACTS FORUM NEWS, August. 19S*
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