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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 7, August 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 7, August 1955 - File 052. 1955-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1399/show/1381.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-08). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 7, August 1955 - File 052. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1399/show/1381

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 7, August 1955 - File 052, 1955-08, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1399/show/1381.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 7, August 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date August 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 052
Transcript wsm ill —Wide World Photos SOLUTIONS FOR PROBLEM CHILDREN—(left) Highwood School at Baltimore, Md., provides wholesome activities and peaceful living for youngsters who do not adjust to normal school life and authority. At right are views of the George Junior Republic at Freeville, N.Y.. haven for problem children for 60 years. Money paid for work performed (such as gathering hay for the dairy herd in top photo) is deposited in the bank (lower photo) which is run by the boys and girls. Money is minted and issued by the junior republic, a self-contained unit which has helped over 6.000 children through the years. quite severe corporal punishment from their parents; only '.'I pel cenl of the non-delinquents had. ll seemed lo indicate that the parents who over-used chas- tisemenl as ee means of demonstrating whal is wrong and whal is righl actually bred children whose idea nf the world was one of hostility, lhal you had to fight lo gel along, emd that physical aggression wa- ihr answer lo anv problem vou mil. (DOHERTY): Speaking as a father of live, I am wondering if Ihose delinquent children reacted as thev did, not because the punishment was meted out for a crime, hut because it followed no pattern—because sometimes il vvas just the parents expressing their own aggression against Ihe world in general and taking il out on the kids? That'- exactl) right. I didn'l mean lo infer thai iln- onl) reason the) were delinquent was because thej were severeh punished and actually, in elaborating thai study, one of the crucial factors theii they did determine was. jusl as you -eev. inconsistency "i parents and lhe fad thai thc punish en. ul eeri.se'. again as you helve already said, not because e.f the child'- need- I.iii because uf tin- parents' needs to gel ..ul of their own system their greal anger and mixed-up feelings aboul the world the) live in. (DOHERTY): Mr. Beet:, vou seed vou believe mosl of the juvenile delinquency comes from "blighted areas," but lately there seems lo have been a rash of stories of not only moderately well-to-do. but actually rich children getting in trouble. Iii Washington, D. ('.. there was a group ol youths from very well-to-do homes who were bombing places. Also, up in New York there was a ghastl] crime by a group of young boys who killed two or three people merely for tlle thrill of il ; thev were' all from very good homes in Ihe Brooklyn section. I wonder whv. RICH CHILDREN ALSO VULNERABLE ilthough I do believe and I ihink il is a fail lhat mosl ol the juvenile crimes still come frnm llu- "blighted areas." I also said lhal we had an increasing number from lhe suburban and favored areas. The causes of delinquency are nol limited to poor people. \ vulnerable child lo go hack lo that definition- can be raised in a home lhal has a washing machine, television, and everything else lhal you would want; ibis is In to deficiencies in parent-child relations. Likewise, a community can lack whal il should have to keep (hildren on the right line, even though il appears superficially lo be very favored. (GILMORE): How far should lhe federal governmenl go in trying to combat juvenile delinquency? lhe federal government's role al lhe present lime is almosl entirely one of giving consultation emd eulviea- in I11151I communities and states lhal have problems such as: "How el.' we set up a juvenile court? ; "Whal kind of juvenile division should we have in our police system?" The federal governmenl doesn'l seek to actually develop programs for children in ihis particular field. This is ihe business of iln stales and localities. There are, of course, programs hearing on ihis problem hv which federal funds go down In tin states, such as the Child Welfare Act. emd the National Minted Health \ct lhal provide- funds fur child guidance clinics ami lln like. w —Wide World Ph°*° Boys in the reform school at Stringtown, Okla., find happinesS and hope through the education and recreation program of >^e school superintendent, J. W. Wheeler, former football star. r REPLIES TO "THE LIBERAL MIND" 'Continued in,tn Page lit eminentl) sensible suggestion. Bul once more Mrs. |;rM| preferred to keep the matter private by relaying mv proposal to Mr. Msop. Instead of being .lulv grateful for an effective solution nf lii- 1: red problem. Mr. Vlsop became un- ■ IS .L5il.lv nieul. 1 !:■ -enl me a -pull, ring letter nf hv s- terical abuse thai would make a 5 1 laboratory piece for a psychologist. I was. among other things, et fool, ei traitor. a lowlife. In short, hr presented mi' with another sample of his edifying belief that hr considered himself exempl from the ordinary journalistic obligation of truth-telling in dealing wilh people "of the character" nf Matthews. Lveeiis eunl presumably Buckley. The insult-packed letter had, from ii- w liter's vantage point, ihr additional virtue nf evading ihr original issue. H1' nol onlv assumed for himself lhe rig'1' lu misrepresent a Matthews bul the f"r' iher righl to refuse an explanation "' traitors who heul the ill grace to call tn* misrepresentation to his attention. I submit thai ihis exchange of letter* unimportant in itself, becomes signi'J' caul in the context of Bill Buckley8 analysis of the Liberal mind. hi i.rxt: Lyons, Editoi Pleasantville, V V I'age .111 FACTS FORUM NEWS, August, 1»5"
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