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Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 7, August 1955
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 7, August 1955 - File 020. 1955-08. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. November 28, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1399/show/1349.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1955-08). Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 7, August 1955 - File 020. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1399/show/1349

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 7, August 1955 - File 020, 1955-08, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed November 28, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/1399/show/1349.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 4, No. 7, August 1955
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date August 1955
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 4 1955; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 020
Transcript • ;* why should so many countries want to belong? The- I nited Nations lias little direct power in itself. It is an association of independenl steiles. not a world government. Its resolutions have no legal i-fli-ii until governments approve them and decide to do something about them. TALK TO AVOID WARS But the I nited Nations provides the means l»v which representatives nl nalions ran meet and diseuss their problems. By leilkinu them umi they can avoid war-. By studying and discussing together, they can deride how their governments ran help lo make things better in the world. Th.- declared purposes eef ihe- I nited Nations arc: 1. To maintain international peace and security; 2. To develop friendly relations among nalions based mi respeel for lhe equal rights eiml self-determination of people- : :l. 'lei cooperate in solving international problems of an economic. -ne ieel. cultural, or humanitarian character, and in promoting respect fur human rights .nul fundamental freedoms fm' all: anil 1. Tee he- a center for harmonizing ihe aeiieens of nations in attaining these common ends. Those are lln1 principles on which the United Nalions Organization is based the principles which motivate I nited Nations activities. I- there anything dangerous, or subversive, in those prin- cipleS? Let's look a liilli- further at lhe I nited Neiiinn- Charter: "To fulfill these purposes, lhe- I nited Nations en-is in accordance wilh these principles: "I. The organization is based on the principle eef ihe- sovereign equality of all ii- Members; "2. Members are In fulfill in good faith the obligations they have assumed under thc Charter; '"',. The) .in' lee settle their international disputes by peaceful means; "4. They are lo refrain in their international relations from tin- threat ier ie-e of force in anv manner inconsistent with the purposes of lhe I nited Nalions: "5. Thev are in give the I nited \;i- lions every assistance in any action il lakes in accordance with lhe Charter, and to refrain from giving assistance lo any state emeiinsi which lln- organization is taking preventive or enforcement action; "6. lhe 1 nited Nations is lo ensure lhat non-Members acl in accordance wilh these principles so far as is necessary fm maintaining international peace and security: "7. I In- organization ie- nol in intervene in matters essentially within the domestic jurisdiction of an) slate. This provision does not apply, however, when —Wide World Photo John D. Rockefeller, Jr., purchased the area pictured above at a cost of eight million 500 thousand dollars as an outright gift to the UN for permanent headquarters. The purchase price included all property in the above area with the exception of a small block which New York City agreed to obtain and turn over to the UN. enforcement action is taken with respect to threats lo the peace, breaches of the peace, and acts of aggression. ' This seventh statement of principle ilieil the- I nited Nations is not to inter- vene in matters essentially within lhe domestic jurisdiction of anv state—is in itself ei refutation of lhe charge lhal ihr I nited Nations Charter has undermined the sovereignly of the I nited Slales. In ihe lew instances where domestic policies have been changed lo coincide with ihe statement of principles and standards of justice set hy the United Nalions Charter, Ihe decision has been made lev Americans themselves hv American judges who have had sufficient \isiien to recognize thai if our own domestic policies conflict wilh universal declarations of human rights, the deficiencies lie nol wilh Ihe I nited Nations Charter bul with our own Constitution. MARRIAGE OF FOREIGN-DOMESTIC We arc gradually coming to the realization, moreover, lhal we can no longer arbitrarily separate domestic ami foreign issues. \s Dean Acheson anil John Foster Dulles have stated, in llu- complexities and intricacies of international tension anil modern diplomacy, it is no longer pn-sihlr tee label mir is-ur domestic eiml another foreign, for even the mosl trivial domestic problem may have a real emd acute hearing on our inter- naiioiial relationships. The problem nl reconciling human rights and national rights cannot be evaded, li musl be worked eil continually, because the line between universal rights .mil Ine eel rights changes wild the evolution "I international communication, culture, society, eunl organization. Under international law. ei staler domestic jurisdiction is determined hy international obligations. .Any controversy or dispute which involves lhe interpretation or application of an international obligation is therefore nol within any nations exclusive jurisdiction. International obligations arise from treaties. Only a sovereign nation rem make ;i treaty, hut insofar as a neitiun has assumed obligations hy treaties to respeel or protect human rights, il has qualified its domestic jurisdiction. The United Nations Charter is a treaty; emd. undoubtedly, lhe I nited States government, in ratifying lhat treaty, heis assumed certain obligations in respect to human rights which th'' I nited Steiies governmenl did not previously have under the Constitution. "LET NO MAN PUT ASUNDER" Hut there is nothing improper or dangerous in our being interested in ways lo proleel and guarantee human freedoms in lhe world. The I nited States does not and musl nol avoid aiding such endeavors. We musl nol permil ourselves lo he infected with the hysteria of the UN-haters, simply because in a few instances we have raised ihe standards of our own laws as a resull of participation in the United Nations. The I nited Villeins is and musl remain lhe keystone of Inited Slales foreign poliev. We cannol possibly hope io have a peaceful world unless we have a meeting place- where eill lhe- n;i- tions of lhe world can nieel emd i'\|>l' — their views and bring their grievances. It is significant to note thai since the formation of the 1 nited Nations, only Iwo nations — Communist China and North Korea — have committed ads ol aggression which threatened the peace of the world. Neither of these nalions weis a member of the I nited Nalions: emd thev were not. therefore, bound b) ils purposes and principles. Is il no' possible In believe thai if these- two nations had been permitted to join in <"' operation wilh other nalions through il"' 1 \. lln- course- of recenl history might have been differenl and infinitel) better? lie-pile- ihe ten-year record ol i'1' United Nations despite the irritating turmoil of prolonged IN discussion' and controversies it is probably in1'' thai very few Americans have actuall) re-eid emd studied the document on wlii''1 the I nited Nalions is founded: t'11 Inited .Nations Charier. Most peop'e probably do not really understand **■ iel. as Eleanor Roosevelt has said, u" things we do not understand are ll" things we fear. If every person in Ame*J ica would take the time to read a"' Study the United Nalions Charter unl' he really undent 1 its purposes ai" principles, there would he nunc ol '''' hysterical fear of the IN which tl"' SUperpatriotS arc now able to incite. 'leee-ksei Jasper °PP Oiark I'll.nix S»l«cauK .["linden.- Ii„j. froy aWUCalon. *i»choi ei,"** '""aiia "»ln«low Page 18 FACTS FORUM NEWS, August, H>5i
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