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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 030. 1956-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 19, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/99.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-06). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 030. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/99

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 030, 1956-06, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 19, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/99.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date June 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 030
Transcript nationalized industries are absolute monopolies and, as such, impose their own terms of service on the community. The personal relationship between the trade union officials and the trade unionist is virtually nonexistent. The big unions have card-indexed nearly all the flesh and blood out of the movement. Nothing counts and little matters except numbers, politics, fees, and fines. Its gross, impersonal accountancy has created an impassable barrier between the rank and file and officialdom. Too much power is concentrated in too few hands, eind the little man is nowhere in the fantastic scheme of things. A healthy trade unionism, based on the sound principles which brought it into existence, would shun politics. Its present demoralization is overwhelmingly due to the fact that it has shifted its center of gravity from the industrial to the political arena, eind encouraged its membership to accept the State as the last word in social and economic emancipation. A policy that encourages men to go slow and to separate every single function of a job into watertight compartments cannot fail to encourage abuse, sloth, and irresponsibility. The bricklayer who imagines he has achieved a special brand of emancipation merely in consequence of the fact that he lays three or four hundred bricks a day against his prototype's one thousand or more, twenty-five years ago, is living in cloud-cuckoo land. All he has succeeded in doing is to contribute to the costliness and scarcity of houses and, incidentally, to aggravate a social problem that injures his class in the community. The working classes have punished themselves with severity. 1 he political machine will sooner or later scrap the trade union machine as redundant unless, meantime, trade unionism of its own volition denounces and rejects the political method, ancl reverts to its legitimate function of providing a forum where master and man can settle their mutual problems in cooperation and in equity. No thinking man or woman in Great Britain can doubt for a split second that contemporary trade unionism is riddled with communism from top to bottom. Trade unionism at all levels has greatly betrayed itself. When, as often happens, a mere handful of Communists can bring out on strike a thousand or more men, it is surely germane to suggest that these thousand or more men bene some responsibility in the matter. It is unthinkable that all of them are sheep. There i.s neither mystery nor ambiguity in Communist infiltration throughout the ranks of trade unionism. The Communists themselves have revealed all there is to be known about their strategx and tactics, in a pamphlet called Strike, Strategy and Tactics: A Thesis Adopted hij the Strasbourg International of Labor Unions, which is today a manual for Communist industrial warfare. I \x ill stimulate the reader's appetite with a few selected sentences: "If a strike should break out unexpectedly, the Communists will press for a meeting of the workers involved, at which the election of a committee should be proposed and a list of candidates, prepared beforehand, should be brought forward." Communists are warned that they may find themselves a minority in the initial stage and they must, there-fore, "display the utmost circumspection, tact, ancl understanding in order to win the majority for the revolutionary tactics." And here is a choice fragment: "Non-Communists should be entrusted with all kinds of. functions in order to draitf them into direct collaboration and participation in the struggle." Non-Com- Page 28 munist workers who make a good impression are "to be earmarked as potential recruits to the Communist army. and, later, must receive individual attention with a view to complete conversion. Finally, the thesis gives precise instructions regarding the composition of its infiltration squads. It directs that "as soon as a conflict is maturing in some branch of industry, the best forces must be sent to the field of struggle." There are many pages of this kind. They have terrifying implications, which should be exposed and explained to every trade unionist in the country. J. he Socialist politicians in their constant exhortations to "the organized workers" seldeim fail to drag in tbe profit motive with the implication that those who believe in i' are "lower than vermin." The tragedy is that the pron' motix-e is in danger of becoming the profit mirage. The dual demand that there must not be any ceiling to wages anel not even a door for profits is as idiotic as asking • deep-sea diver to climb a mountain without coming W the surface. Why cannot we all be honest and admit th*' the man or woman who does not work for profit is eithef a fool, a saint, or a full-time housewife? The wage that is a cost to the employer is a profit to the employee. I admit that this is a simplification of ■' complex aspect of economics, but it is substantially true- The point I stress is that trade unionists are as susceptih" to the incentives of the profit motive as are any other sections of the community. America, today, is champagne to the palate of an i'u''' vidualist who realizes that life is a challenge, and wh° relishes tbe challenges of living. It is necessary to li''"1 England and see America in order to realize the full e-xte" of Britain's decline under socialism. I am not stressing tn obvious disparity in material things, although the elif"' ence in the two standards of living is so marked that it *j difficult to believe that Great Britain once proudly clai'W to have achieved the highest in the world. The stun"1"" contrast in the two economies is in deeper soil than lo"x anel fishes, pots and pans, motor cars ancl cigars. 1 , th'1' make only a feeble attempt to capture it by suggesting it is an attitude of mind, a vital spark, a faith that belief, all things are possible, and a profound belief that ^ helps those who help themselves. How Our People Are Affected A society which places the emphasis on what it e%P*J to receive, rather than on what it is prepared to give, *| eventually discover that it has lost the very roots ot I stability. Any man who thinks the State owes him a B* I is telling the world that he cannot stand upright with" the eiiil of borrowed crutches. ,( One of the major fallacies of the age in which WP j, is that social reform is socialism and that socialist social reform. Social reform is conscience pricked into c trite and creative activity. Socialism is st'll-eonseio"''" | puffed up with arrogance and iconoclasm. Tbe '" iv social reform is whether it puts wrongs right righte'"ll>A whether it removes injustice justly, ancl whether t* I punges inequalities equably. If it offers temporary s:l .,,- tion for some, at the heavy price of damnation I'"' ■ many, it is not social reform. A second look will Il'\ ,| that it is socialism. A third inspection will disclose it is communism. m The hardest-worked word in the vocabulary ot paterna Socialis one thir very thi where i Power a the pre< to destr The\ ain is th mat,.]v - hy the further i It woi for all , hear the had situ 'nefficier Virtua short su] suffering luantitv *eeke< *hich c, and woe *fthah ,,0n, and lst gover ,%, con ^ Writte S Boo] hamlet i, *Ja\ii, i of freedc er,y. See Publish Sive, , "osever N fooc Vathe. in6?' a»< l!1 'he F, pre: lave ni H^ecentl S unc yo 'ers | >ass 'stioris Nl ex tl., 'ose ha li •tiese 51swe "lin Facts Forum News, June, ^ •tats sev, >nc,ic C*»evei tjs Roin Politi ^< <*] St*ur Nle wi \ V'i: s Foi
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