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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
File 029
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 029. 1956-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. October 25, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/98.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-06). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 029. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/98

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 029, 1956-06, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed October 25, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/98.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date June 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 029
Transcript Both the miners anel the community were assured that nationalization of the coal industry would produce contented miners, contented consumers, ancl eager customers from abroad. Ancl yet it affords a complete refutation of the Socialist claim. Lack eif c-eial has brought Great Britain to the- very edge of economic collapse. -I in Socialist government claimed that it was imperative to nationalize electricity because, under private enterprise and local government, (he sen ice leieke-d coordination, was Wasteful, anel riddled xvith the defects of competition. One answer to this criticism is thai in pre-nationalization clays Wectricity was cheap, plentiful, anel efficient. Throughout the whole period [of nationalization], Britain has been short of electricity, industry has been partly 'Tippled, hospitals have' be'en tragically disorganized, anel "ie domestic consumer has suffered an interminable series °t inconveniences'. Power cuts have disrupted the economic and social life ol the nation, while consumers have "ad to pay extra millions for electricity. Ihe gas industry was vested in State ownership; its administration passed into the hands of the Gas Council. *hose chairman admitted that he was taking over a "taneially sound and administrative!) efficient industry. ''-< pronouncement proves that the gas industry, like' the S,""I industry, was grabbed by the State, not on any "'"unel of failure in service to the community or because 'J financial instability, but in furtherance of Socialist 'deology. Gas is dearer and decidedly less plentiful. During the rst year, eight of the' twelve Area Gees Boards raised luce's tei their respective consumers. century - iiid": .-n''1 4 fromj 1 serv* , , 1& tl, BE case' against the- nationalization of civil aviation is ''""'tie-ally overwhelming and, in practice-, confirms the "lsl misgivings of the experts who opposed it. Civil ' 'atlon is a job for pioneers, for men of vision anel action, 'r i"elivi(liialists. Chartered companies were meeting and '''eomi'ng their economic problems under the stimula- 0,1 ol competition and the rewards that follow quality . rviee. Nationalization has thrown this healthy, develop- ," industry into disequilibrium, with two facts emerging: > "normous operational losses ancl (2) the self-evident "spiracy to use- monopolistic power to destroy private ""''Prise competition. j. lhe inefficiency, incivility, and dilatoriness eif national- ^ road transport are incredible. The British press has ^'""li'd thousands of cases supporting these charges ^'"tist a monopoly which threatens tei strangle a eonsid- r'ihl<- leit " part of Britain's industrial economy. Three years of 'Onedized road transportation can be summed it]) in tf era] terms: (1) higher ancl higher passenger and higher running eeists: (4) larger anel larger jg'ght rates; (2) higher anel ,1 ' Poorer ancl poorer service: *ficits Tl, f(, "' creation of huge' deficits is a prominent statistical l|' '"'" in most of the nationalized industries and utilities. f nationalized railways have contributed nothing to a I efsal of this non-profit orgy. With a perversity wholly Id if "cable, the planners accept deficits as a compliment Jeir executive acumen. HV i "ationalization of all the larger units in the iron anel he, "!('"xtry is probably the most dangerous economic ""nt in the- whole Socialist program. The failure of "ationalized coal industry is certain to have immediate I ori m News, June, 1956 and serious repercussion em steel which, under private industry, held output records unsurpassed by any other major industry in the country. The fact is that the steel industry has passed into the hands eif people wheise knowledge of it is negligible. The- Socialist government has much to answer for, but I venture to suggest that history- will record the nationalization of steel as its greatest blunder. As xvith road transportation, steel has been nationalized em the installment plan, a policy calculated tei make confusion confounded. All steel-making firms producing annually 50,000 tons or more of iron ore, or 20,000 tons or more eif pig iron, ingots, or hot rolled steel products are now completely nationalized. All other steel-making firms producing more than 5,000 tons are permitted tei operate only under Corporation licenses. All firms of lower pro- iliieing potentials are, at present, operating under private enterprise; but these firms cannot safely plan for the future because the Corporation, under the Act, is given almost unlimited powers of acquisition anel extension. The State has acquired private property at compulsory liquidation prices. It has come into possession of the major portion of a 100 per cent efficient industry which in the- peest heis made incalculable contribution to the strength eif British economy, is the backbone of many interdependent industries, and has made a mighty contribution tei the Exchequer. And this is the industry that the government is now attempting to run em a Civil Service technique that must leael tei rigid centralization and consequent lack of flexibility and adaptability. Nationalism is reducing trade unionism to impotence. Socialism wil] surely and inevitably destroy the cooperative movement and will do so chiefly because State monopoly is safe only when every \estige of competition is eliminated. To say that there would have been no national recovery without nationalization is a piece eif wishful thinking which has no basis in fact. The bulk of the country's dollar earnings has been duo to tlie magnificent efforts eif private enterprise, notwithstanding Socialist restrictions and controls. The Unions Under Socialism Winston Churchill said, in 1949: "Nothing is more clear than that socialism spells the doom of trade unionism. This i.s already the case' in all totalitarian states where the trade unions are merely a department of the State employer-control, and are used not for tlie purpose of obtaining redress for workers' grievances, but to make them come along as quietly as they will, before the sterner measures ol Socialist or Soviet government have to be enforced." It is not difficult to sum up the limitations and unrealities ol current trade unionism in Great Britain. Great numerical strength has actually weakened it. The policy of telescoping comparatively small unions into one big union is superficially attractive. It provides a bigger ancl thicker stick as a bargaining instrument. But the size eif the stick is less important than the stature of the- man who holds it; anel it is even more important that the man w ho holds it, by consent, does not hand it over to another, under duress. Now this is what is happening under nationalization: The big stick, like the victims of it. is in process eif being State-controlled. Feir years, trade unionists have inveighed against monopolies anil, conc/irrently, the unions have become increasingly monopolistic. 1 he Page 27 V
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