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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 028. 1956-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 20, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/97.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-06). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 028. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/97

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 028, 1956-06, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 20, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/97.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date June 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 028
Transcript profession. It would be treated with contempt by those who are protected by organized industrial trade unionism. And qualified young doctors experience increasing difficulty in establishing themselves in practice. They find it almost impossible to secure appointments, and no less difficult to obtain practices. On the one hand, appointments directly obtainable through the Ministry of Health ancl its regional representatives are inevitably limited by the fact that the Ministry is noxv at its wits' end to devise new and effectix'e instruments for its enforced economy drive. In the circumstances, new medical appointments are not popular in official circles. On the other hand, young doctors are discovering that the older and established general practitioners are themselves in most cases in such a financial predicament that then- cannot, even if they wished to do so, accept their young colleagues as assistants. If they did so they would, under the terms of remuneration laid clown in the National Health Service, suffer financial loss because they must share their gross per capita fees with their assistants. Today, many medical practices do not provide adequate incomes even on the basis of one doctor for one practice. It is a poor lookout for the new generation of medical men and women who may, or may not, have optimistically assumed that nationalized medicine would offer economic security to the professional strata of society. The doctors have a lot to answer for in every aspect of nationalized medicine. For all practical purposes they eliel not sell themselves and their patients to the socialized government; they presented the profession and the public on a plate as a gift. It is both lamentable and scandalous that the profession now finds itself in the ignominious position of haggling with the authorities for an extra shilling or two increase in the per capita fees; ancl that it has had to acknowledge publicly that, without an increase-. the majority of doctors cannot continue to meet their financial obligations. There is something grand, even majestic, about the word "democracy." It implies so much that is good in human behavior. It also conceals so much that is thoroughly bad. In its worst interpretation it gives verisimilitude to the concept that all men are equal whereas, in terms of politics, it merely recognizes that all men have xotes. You cannot legislate unsuccessful people into prosperity merely by legislating successful people out of it. Nationalized Industry and Utilities It is a major technique in the Socialist effort to disrupt anel ultimately destroy the private enterprise system of capitalism. Both socialism ancl communism stress the social ancl economic advantages of public ownership of industry. Both promise the workers partnership and participation in industry at managerial ancl even at proprietorial levels. Socialism proceeds on the installment plan; communism grabs the whole economic outfit with strategic finality. At journey's end, socialism is in liquidation inside the accommodating belly of the Communist tiger. Monopoly is a word repeatedly used in Socialist propaganda. Why the Socialists dare exploit it is one of the mysteries. They are supermonopolists themselves. The alpha to omega of socialism is the creation of the all- powerful State which, at maturity, monopolizes everything and everybody. Nationalization is monopoly rampant. Page 26 Although Socialist and much trade' union propaganda persisted over the years to stress Marx-Communist aspiration of "ownership by the workers of the means of production, distribution, ancl exchange," the Fabian-Socialist intellectuals, obsessed with their theories of political and social planning, gradually evolved a new formula that was intended to preserve some of the choicest plums of planning for themselves. "Ownership by the workers" wee- subtly changed to "ownership by the State as trustee of the people." The amazing fact about this radical amendment of one of the commandments of labor-class socialism is that the trade-union movement utterly failed to realize the signifi' cance of the changed nomenclature and its ominous implications. Today, I think there are not many trade unionists in Great Britain who have not discovered that in getting rid of the capitalist as employer they have merely placed their destinies in the control of an impersonal employer- State. Nationalization is an essential feature of a planned economy; and a planned economy, in the long run- depends upon planned human beings. Workers have discovered that the nationalized industries emel utilities are being run uneconomically and ineffr ciently; that their very security, as workers in these State" controlled undertakings, i.s precarious. The nationalization boards possess vast powers and authority. A coal iniii''' for example, discharged from one pit, finds it extreme!) difficult to sell his services to another — the boss in e""' pit i.s almost certain to be the boss in another, over a very wide region. The working-classes, who naively assume1 that nationalization would make them owners of indusV/' are left low and wet on the planners' beach. \J\i-: of the big talking points exploited by the advocate* of nationalization was that State-owned industries won" insure cheaper and more efficient production and service* and that the elimination of costly competition would res11 in financial prosperity. This argument, exposed tei the fief- light of practical experience, has been thrown overboaTy Now the argument is that paying its way is not essentia'' a major consideration in nationalization technique. Pub" service, according to the Socialists, must now take Piej dence over such mundane considerations as profit si loss. If this is the new economies, the already °v( | burdened taxpayer can look forward to some new' "' highly disagreeable impositions. Nationalization in Pri' tice is becoming more anel more dependent on State su, sidy or loan or arbitrary price increases — new final"-' obligation which the consumer, as taxpayer, cannot eva' Nationalization is socialism. In full economic opera"' I it place's the State in absolute command anel control the whole resources of the nation. The 25 per cent "f J industrial activities already landed in the State's ",. embraces almost all the key industries anel utilities; th1 fore, the remaining 75 per cent at present operating un , private enterprise is greatly dependent on the nation-'!''" 25 per cent for its very existence. In Britain's economic- development over the cent"* I coal has contributed more to it than any other single h*~5 trial activity xvith the possible exception of our i"v'*\,i, exports which, in any case, are fundamentally commefj Coal is certainly our main source of home-grown e'1" .j,. and will inevitably continue ett this high level of ,n I pensability until atomic energy can be diverted lien" " ,. applied economically to civil serV tary priorities and applied I \i is Forum News. June, \& Jllu \ '-'"l" Vr-""'" 111 r|"1('" "ation >Fo.
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