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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
File 027
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 027. 1956-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 18, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/96.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-06). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 027. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/96

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 027, 1956-06, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 18, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/96.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date June 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 027
Transcript •g< he eit ti. he1 pay Paul reached its apotheosis when the State decided it was entitled to expropriate hospital endowments. These contributions, which were both numerous and generous, "ere made by donors voluntarily, and frequently for specific objects. I am amazed that so many people in lower-income groups have not yet discovered that a State-controlled hospital service, supposedly available to all sections of the community, must inevitably increase rather than diminish their anxieties when illness descends upon them. Today, there are infinitely more people competing for admittance to the hospitals. Really ill people are swept aside in the mad rush for medical treatment. 1 Here is much hypocrisy in the British political scene. ' do not resent the Socialist higher-ups who, when sick themselves, seek and obtain till the amenities that characterized our now largely discarded private medical practice. ' Would not prohibit our Socialist masters from obtaining telease from their sufferings anywhere in the world. If *Wiss, or French, or German medical science is their last n°po, let them go to those countries for treatment ancl Bood luck to them. All I ask is that thereafter they either Preach what they practice, or practice what they preach, "hy are we willing to barter our heritage eif freedom for * spurious social security which even those who plan it know is a synonym for a regimented and totalitarian society? The architectural specifications for nationalized medicine were originally assembled in a governmental report by Lord Beveridge which bears his name. The British Public has got what it asked for ancl what it deserved. Il(' pity is that when something critically substantial °nlci have been done about it, the public allowed itself 0 he taken in by a political emphasis on benefits that "lS|niiateel that the other fellow, whoever he might be, Quid foot the bill. Today, the whole nation is paying •rough the nose for its fantastic- incapacity to recognize, the propitious moment, that even in the crazy arithmetic Marxian ideology something for nothing does not rf «p. ,r> the Beveridge Report the author laid down two Peeifie assumptions for a National Health Service. i Ssi"nption "A" is that it is the duty of the citizen to ''P well. Assumption "B" is that it is the duty of the £tor to exercise harsh certification. 1 these' assumptions are not pious pleas to patient anel ^,,ctor to be good children. They are stern, dictatorial fiats. ., "' author of them implied their necessity on the grounds ■ '" "n actuarial basis lor a National Health scheme xvas -Practicable otherwise, and I am not disposed tei contra- him. In effect, these assumptions are' whips to be used ,lnd when the powers that be determine that doctors, Patients, or both, would be all the better for a little "'shiiK'nt. Both doctor and patient have already e.xperi- l(',(l tin- whips in action. II s the months pass it becomes increasingly obvious that .Ministry of Health is stiffening its attitude toward iimal A al se< itereo /| wen* ' |»' on to \ r peter I. ..I/'. * w «uiauj err (i 0|c;tl certification. It insists that the doctor must toe line or fall out of it. His prescriptions are vetoed. He it 1„> economical. His last word on what is or is not lii.,i' '''' '"'" his patients becomes only the first word from -r saiietinninir authority. He has voluntarily placed ."'"sell fcirre sanctioning in the ignominious position of having to beg for a t|"'" salary, lie is being made to realize more and more he is no longer his own master professionally be- ^ Forim News, June. 1956 cause-, economically, he is a servant of the State. It is not difficult to foresee that when he has been thoroughly softened up he will hardly notice that he has become harsh, anel is fully capable of acting accordingly. The patient who has been told that it is his duty to keep well has nothing to laugh about either. He is just as likely a recipient of the whip as his doctor. The way things are developing economically must, sooner or later, produce a situation in which he will not be able to afford to be ill. LIeaTH ancl infant mortality rates are acid tests of the efficiency of a medical service. American private medical practice can confidently face comparison with British nationalized medicine on these two aspects of social xvel- fetre. In both categories Great Britain comes off second best. Harold E. Stassen, after investigating the workings ol State medicine in Great Britain, summed up his impressions in the caustic comment: "The British experiment has resulted in more medical care of a lower quality for more people at higher cost." It is astonishing that many people in Greeit Britain do not even now realize, despite a large dose of socialism in practice, that the State, as the State, docs not possess a single' nickel. Its occasional outbursts of generosity are made when the State decides tei return a portion of the money it has already extracted from the pockets of the people. I suppose we shall one day wake up to the fact that the ever-increasing strength of State purchasing power is the measure of the decline in the purchasing power of its citizens. We are not et violent people. One of our most majestic contributions to civilization is surely the manner in which we have demonstrated to the world that revolution is ;i poor anel bloody substitute for evolution. Even the politic ians know this. They believe that half a loaf is better than no bread. They know that when it is eaten it is comparatively easy to persuade hungry people to devour the other half. Every scrap of socialistic legislation has been imposed upon us by the installment plan. If there is an unpopular word in the vocabulary of Socialists, it is the word "socialism." They hide it behind the skirts of "Labor," or, when hard pressed, behind the austerity curtains of a "planned economy." The nationalization of medicine is an integral part of the Socialist State. It may prove to be the last and strongest link in the chain that is being forged for the eventual communization eif Great Britain. The total abolition of private medical practice would be a national disaster. But this is precisely the ultimate intention of the political powers that be. The late Sir Ernest Graham-Little, who represented the University of London in Parliament, was profoundly inter- esleel in the welfare anel management of University College Hospital, one of the hospitals which the Ministry of Health acquired under the National Health Act. Sir Ernest himself gene me the following fact which I reveal without comment. The running costs of University College Hospital under voluntary administration in the year 19.3S were £125,000 (roughly $350,000). In the first financial year of nationalized medicine thev increased ten times to the colossal sum of £1,125,000, or roughly $3,500,000. JPjieiMixiii necessity is forcing many doctors to adopt a mercenary attitude. A per capita fee which works out at a gross payment of roughly fixe cents a week per patient is hardly calculated to produce a prosperous and dignified Page 25 1 ! fs ing !, i.
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