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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
File 026
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 026. 1956-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. June 4, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/95.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-06). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 026. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/95

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 026, 1956-06, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed June 4, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/95.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date June 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 026
Transcript and women who admit that socialism in practice has disillusioned and enlightened them. They never were Socialists. They were, and are, social reformers. The pardonable mistake they made in the beginning was that they failed to recognize the totalitarian fist in the planned economy gloxe. Socialism is centralization, regimentation, direction, compulsion, and conscription; any elementary textbook on the subject implicitly confirms these affirmations. We have been promised freedom from worry, freedom from fear, freedom from want. The one freedom the State will not voluntarily grant is freedom of the individual from the Steete itself. The capitalist system will commit suicide, even before communism has a chance to assassinate it, if it fails to prove to the great majority, by both words and actions, that it, and it alone, is capable of sustaining a high standard of fixing and the highest possible standard of life, under liberty. It can do so. It has done so. But bow many people in Great Britain or in the United States are aware of this historic fact? I have well-founded reasons for the suspicion that quite a number of ceipitalists have hardly any intellectual appreciation of what the capitalist system has done for them. Nationalized Medicine In view of my public platform activities in defense of freedom in medicine it is, perhaps, not surprising that I am privileged to enjoy the confidence ancl trust of a large- circle of doctors. I, therefore, can write with humble authority on what socialized medicine has done ancl is doing to the medical profession because I have frequently seen the effects with my own eyes. And what I have seen appalls me. Many doctors in Great Britain are breaking down under the stresses and strains put upon them by the National Health Act. They are frustrated, bewildered, enervated, and disillusioned. Their bitterest enemies cannot accuse them of not having put forward a conscientious effort tei make the best of a bad job. Their best friends cannot honestly overlook the fact that they brought most of their misfortunes upon themselves or, if they didn't, then some of their so-called leaders did it for them. But the time for recrimination is long since past. Only the present and the future bene significance in terms of salvation. Despite all political protestations of goodwill and equity, nationalized medicine, with its emphasis on centralization and its dependence on the "committee mind" for its soulless functioning, cannot fail to degrade a greeit calling and an honorable vocation which lives and has its being in the voluntary spirit. It does not lend itself to regimentation. The British public is saddled with a National Health Service expenditure which even the Minister of Health admits heis reached the sky in prodigality. Over a billion dollars a year i.s the bill that the British public i.s called upon to pay for a health service which originally was publicized as free. Very tew people in Great Britain can seriously believe that nationalized medicine is equivalent to getting something for nothing. The State ancl Father Christmas are not even em speaking terms. Two outstanding features in Britain's social services are seldom referred to by politicians, especially those who, for vote-catching purposes, prefer to talk about privileges and rights rather than about Page 24 responsibilities and obligations. They are: 1. Almost everybody in tin- community is legally responsible for a weekly contriheition, amounting to approximately two million dollars [total]. Every employee knows that his real salary or wage, his net purchasing power, is the total of what is left after income teex eend socieel insurance have been deducted at the' source. This purchasing power is diluted by ;i purchase tax of anything from 16?a per cent to 125 peT cent on wholesale prices ancl ranging over a wiele' variety of gootls and services. 2. The Social Services, including National Health, are compulsory. It is not possible to contract nut of them. Rich and poor and the not-so-rich and not-so-poor are indiscriminately fore-eel into the scheme. Whether or not they intend to avail themselves of the benefits, they must pay. Any recalcitrance is sternly discouraged by fines or imprisonment or both. That there is a substantial minority of citizens in Great Britain today who would contract out, if it were- possible to do so legally, is incontrovertible. Nationalized medicine is totalitarianism in action. JT icuratively, the two main columns which stand at the entrance of the edifice of medicine symbolize privacy and secrecy. Without them the significance and personal quality of the relationship between doctor and patient are meaningless. As the soul's frailties are the special concern eif the priest, so the infirmities of the human body arc the particular province- of the doctor. But neither priest n°r doctor can accomplish his appointed task without the confidence, trust, and faith of those who seek his succor. In an official leaflet issued to all householders in the United Kingdom explaining the new social services, a categorical guarantee is given in the following terms1 "Your dealings with your doctor will remain as they "|l now, personal and confidential." The British communit) had no sooner digested this political promise than the Minister of Health issued Statutory Instrument Nunil"'r 506 that flatly contradicted the assurance and created 'j" entirely new position in the Ministry's own relationship with the doctors. This instrument unequivocally dofulCl, this relationship in a section entitled "Terms of Service which stressed that "every practitioner enrolled in tn service is required to keep records of the illnesses of '"' public patients and of his treatment of them in such fori* ' as the Minister meiy from time tei time determine, and forward such records to the local Executive Council. The local executive councils consist mainly of lay Pe / sons who are thus placed in the privileged position ° acquiring intimate knowledge of the misfortunes of ofl neighbors. The point I stress is that this procedure ine' tably lends itself to abuse. Even if it is not abused loathe fact remains that the bureaucracy at higher levels is possession of information that properly should never P9 out of the hands of the medical profession. From time immemorial, doctors in Great Britain 0* voluntarily accepted the Hippocratic oath as binding °Pj them professionally. Indeed, the oath was strictly enforc by the British Medical Association. j Nationalized medicine has produced a new version the deietor's dilemma: If the doctor abides by his HipP., cratic oath, he must disobey the State upon whom h« now hergely dependent for his salary. On the other V , if he disregards his oath anel places his patients and c° jS dences at the disposal of the Ministry of Health, n6 clearly guilty of unprofessional conduct. When the State acquired all but an infinitesimal P. of the institutional and private-practice medical senj it took every precaution to insure that they entered new system poor anel penniless. All the assets went > „ the State pool. All the liabilities were passed on to ^ taxpayers. This one-track technique of robbing Pete 1^ Facts Forum News, June- .^P we St"r ti Hiese Sorto tk e ;u'th ban» >;ictic J* him. S and « ,,r Patier J*ishm< n<*d tl„ tkAs *e " N|"" Heal J* hue, N be fe*al l„- ltT sa >'f i. S sal 7« he i
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