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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 022. 1956-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. January 26, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/91.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-06). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 022. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/91

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 022, 1956-06, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed January 26, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/91.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date June 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States: This item is in the public domain in the United States and may be used freely in the United States. The item may not be in the public domain under the copyright laws of other countries.
Item Description
Title File 022
Transcript p for • !•]» FIGHTING The author suggests a plan to help solve the farm problem. Certainly he highlights a neglected phase of civil defense — strategic storage of agricultural products for emergencies. By CARL H. JACOB TODAY we face the threat of a possible war as different from World War II as that war was from the Revolution. And yet on one of the most vital fronts we are preparing for it in the same archaic way. That front is the food front, anel the same antiquateel weiy is to de) nothing about it until the war starts. This is the way we have done in every war from the Revolution up through World War II, and it has worked splendidly — thus far. At the'outbreak of World War II our farmers, aided by draft deferment eind high priorities for farm machinery, fuel and fertilizer, utilized the land in a marvelous manner anel turned out the greatest agricultural proeluction the world has even seen. Retween 1941 and 1946 our farmers more than doubled their gross income. And so that farmers would not be afraid of any possible post-war let- elown. Congress promised them continued high price supports two years beyond cessation of hostilities. As it turned out, our fanners didn't need that incentive. The fooel crisis in Europe continued three years beyond the war, anil our farmers saved hundreds of millions of lives in the Orient anel in Europe by continuing to send much of their high production abroad in response to an urgent need. The demand for our farm production started to decline in 1949, and the farmers appeared to be in trouble, with surpluses beginning to pile up. However, in 1951 and 1952 the Korean conflict wiped out much of these surpluses. Since 1952 the farmer's path has tended downward. He has had the incentive of high price supports, but there has been no real demand feir his products comparable to the supply. The European farmer, after more than four years on his face following the Page 20 war, is back on his feet, and he is taking most of the market there. Our price support program helped in this by keeping our products home in government storage (to the tune of $8.8 billion now), leaving the overseas market wiele open for the foreign farmer. Other than for current consumption we feel no net-el for our farm production, anel so our farmer is in a bind. The rest of us, however, find outlets for our products. More- than ten per cent of our total national production goes into national defense. This helps keep prices up, which intensifies the Farmer's grief. Compared to 1947-49, prices received by farmers have dropped some seven per cent, while prices paiel by farmers for supplies, interest, labor and the like have gone up twelve per cent. We feel no need for our farmer's products now, other than em a day-today consumption basis, but if the cold war suddenly turns hot, things will be different. We shall turn to the farmer fast. We shall dust off the old slogans, "Food Will Win the War!" and "An Army Marches on Its Stomach!" The only catch is: There will be no food front in an all-out, atomic war. This is something we are overlooking at our national peril ami at Ihe expense right note of the farmer. Civil Defense Administrator Val Peterson has estimated that as much as 60 per cent of our industrial production could be knocked out in a single atomic attack. He has stated that attacks on leading metropolitan are-ets would have the country prostrate, and "on the ground" industrially. Port facilities, railroad terminals anel commercial fooel warehouses are prime targets — when these go, America, as we know it, geie-s with them. American industry is heavily con- centrateel. An attack on a small num ber of cities could also cripple iflj" measurably. Cleveland and Detr"'1 are prime examples. If 50 or 60 per cent of America* industry were destroyed with a sirrg'e attack, what would happen te> Ami'1'1' can agriculture? Our highly mocha"' ized farms arc dependent on industry Without electricity, gasoline, cliese fuel, replacement parts and comffl" cial fertilizers, these farms, which l11'1' duce much of our food, would helplessly crippled in their prodii*; tion. After an atomic attack our aP[ cultural production would be cut h°' 50 to 90 per cent. Even then the f maining 10 to 50 per cent productl* would not be too significant becaU* of the loss of transportation facility As for the part which foeiel will p'j, in winning a war, it will have to . the food we have on hand the day '" war starts. This is one bit of straw* we seem to have overlooked. If ^ a should steirt tomorrow (and in all °r military and either defense p"'l';''(i tions we have to assume it might S* any time), how much food do have on hand? .. We have on hand now, stored . private and government warehoUj,- in various parts of the country, u1''1 J. $9 billion worth of surplus farm P^. ucts. We have ;tt times labeled ' surplus a curse ancl a plague. &. such is the ease- in its present PV{| tion, where it overhangs the inur.;ii anil depresses prices. However, "?y should start tomorrow, we wouM very glad to have this surplus. J In considering the value of ■ farm surplus pile in an atomic j, we will have to discount a good Kjjl tion of it at the outset. Much eif i' ,]f is stored in vital target areas W01*J atomized along with the targets. |Ji of the rest of it would be unava?| where it might be needed mOS> (Continued tin ?"■ Facts Forum News, June, "T;-''xi.'„..
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