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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 019. 1956-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. December 3, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/88.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-06). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 019. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/88

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 019, 1956-06, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed December 3, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/88.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date June 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 019
Transcript Communists among artists ees there ai'e in many professions but to maintain that modern art is the stronghold °» Communists is not borne out by evidencc. In fact pressure i.s brought to bear on the relatively few modern artists who art- Communists in em "fort to get them to adopt the official Socialist Realism style. That this pres- J'»'<' is soft-pedaled in the' ease' eil a jfcndful eil modern artists of great tarne who are Communists simply toeans that the- Party leadership is Willing to close an eye to the work of pttian of international reputation like' pcasso in order to be able' tei claim "s name as an adherent of the party. Hut even in Picasso's case the Com- munists wanted tei make' sure that his j^eptance' as a member dill not me'em "e acceptance of modern art. Gerasi- JJov, President of the' Soviet Academy 'Art, after praising Picasso as a party '"''"'XT. added bluntly, "but he' is "" artist." FREEDOM AND FAIR PLAY THE AMERICAN WAY Th, attempt Mi Pi article !P discredit modern eirt as a whole "•"ough references to the' artists' per- JN conduct or affiliation with spe- I "-' organizations is verj misleading. L 0er I'llort to condemn modern art t|- association she significantly eimits y* obvious fact that every brand of ^o'ogy from the' most conservative ''K' most radical can he' found nt''n[" modern artists. She also makes .attempt tei evaluate objectively the' ^'"■i' of the alliliatiem of individual I Ns with organizations such as those tin' as Communist-front organiza- the^i y tne Attorney General, giving M v the impression that eell artists tj0 ^erc members eil such organiza- ,V|IS are Communists or Communist g^Pathizers. This use' eil the' Attorney |)U er;'l's list runs counter to its steite'el ]„ P°«' which the Department of tlce defines as established "for the' ^/"ice 0f tjje hc,.u]s 0f ,||(. i,,,],,,..,! f0ftlltlve departments and agencies iri 'IS(' in connection with requests for feu Sation regarding employment or e»lrllti0n ln employment of federal stag:°yees." The Department further '"ill. 8 that "the' nature' anel extension of a membership in a designated organization is but one factor to be considered in determining the qualifications of individuals lor employment or retention with the federal government." It is clear from this that the' very government agency which publishes this list is against the principle' eif guilt by association, anel recognizes the' danger of the indiscriminate use of the' list without intelligent evaluation eif the significance anel elate' elf the' individual's membership in a designates! organization. To juelge' the- merit of a work of art and the contribution it makes to our society by the personal conduct, the persona] beliefs or associations of its creator is to accept the standard eil totalitarianism which can only conceive of art or any other manifestation of the human mind as tools to be nse'el lor or against the particular order which they are enforcing. There have always been individualists and dissenters among artists and the' world's cultural heritage weiulel be greatly impoverished inele'e'el il the' weirk e>f such eutists as Michelangelo, Perugino or Courbet hael be'e'ii suppressed because of objections to their personal conduct or affiliations. It is obvious that the artists of a free society must be responsible to the laws enacted by this sne-ie'ty cre'ate'el in eirele'r tei insure its continuation erne! welfare. If an artist through his work transgresses the law, hi' shemlel be' prosecuted anel no responsible organization shonlel associate itself with his transgression. But to suppress the presentation of controversial material in the' arts ees we'll ees any other field of human endeavor is to destroy the very basis eif freedom itself. What greater comfort and encouragement can we offer to Communists or Communist sympathizers in and out of this country than to give substance to their accusations that we do not practice the' principles of freedom and lair play which we proclaim in justifiable pride as our American heritage'':' 'Id appraise modern art and its role in the' contemporary world, it is nec- 1'ssary tei understand its history and what it stands lor. Ml new movements grew out of a rebellion against aca demic standards which seemed to the eertists confining and oppressive. As a typical product of modern free enterprise, art developed a great and unprecedented variety of forms and styles and gave the' individual a free- elenn to ere'eite' eis he' never hael before. It is this variety and individualism in modern art that calls for and should ere'eite' controversy, as controversy is made possible by freedom of speech. The assertion underlying the article, that new anel unfamiliar art, our art of today, is subversive and un-American anil should be suppressed calls for vigorous denial. I know no better way of phrasing the need for freedom of the' eerts than to quote a message sent te> the- Museum of Modern Art last fall on the occasion of our 25th Anniversary by President Eisenhower: Tei nee', in this anniversary, there is a reminder to nil of eis eif an important principle lh.it we should e've'r keep in mind. Tin's principle is that Freedom of the arts is ei basic freedom, one of the pillars elf lihe'rty of our land. For our Republic to stay fret-, those among us with the rare Kilt of artistry must he able freely to use their talent. Likewise' our people' must have unimpaired opportunity to see, to understand, tei profit frenn our artists' work. As lone: as eutists eire- at liberty to te'e'l with high persona] intensity, as lone.' as our artists an- tre-e' tei create with sincerity and conviction, there will he healthy controversy and progress in art. Only thus can there he opportunity for a genius to eon- ceive anel to produce a masterpiece for all mankind. Hut. my friends, how different it is iii tyranny. When artists eere' meiele' the' sleives and tools of the' state; whe-n eertists become chiel propagandists of a e'eiuse, progress is arrested anel creation and genius are destroyed. . . . Let us resolve- that this precious freedom of the arts, the'se- precious freedoms eif America, will, day by day, year by year, become ever stronger, ever brighter in our land. Objective observation of the history of recent years reveals the tact that wherever tyranny has taken holel eil a people and a gewernment, modern art hits been suppressed, but when tyranny is replaced by democratic freedoms, and artists are free to create and people free' to use' their own judgment, modern art once' again emerges. Communism, like all other political systems based on tyranny, condemns art forms that cannot be used eis weapons for its own ends, ft is for this reason that the Communists hate and fear modern art. end *' professed internationalist ttsmilh 1''-rs at natioiialisiu. nt patriotism. "I tn it-hat ice call "American',*,,,." • hois ns forswear our tot-e of court. y Hi the name t,f love nf the world at . rge. lf'r nationalist* answer that . . , ,_'* only the man who ardently loves '* Country first who in actual practice '" net/, an. other country at alt. — Theodore Roosettct Force never changed anybody's mind, hut education and understanding have won a lot of victories, even though they lake longer. — Charles E. Wilson, lint icorils are thing* and a small drop of ink. falling, like dew. upon a thought, produce* that which makes thousands, ju'rhap* million*, think. — Lonn Bykon Foreign policy i* too important to he left to government alone. It must be ha*ett on a fully informed public. — Senator Th, f. Knowland // there is any human force that cannot he withstood, it i* the power *,f the handed intelligence and responsibility of a free community. — liKSiBV W. GRAM < I A A ls Forum News, June, 1956 Page 17
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