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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 017. 1956-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. September 20, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/86.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-06). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 017. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/86

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 017, 1956-06, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed September 20, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/86.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date June 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 017
Transcript nation, she is. of course, entirely correct, but her efforts to associate this statement with modern art are very misleading. For example, Miss Pels quotes William Z. Foster, the American Communist leader, as saying: Tlx-re- must be a clear understanding that art is a weapon in the class struggle. Not only is etrt a weapon, hut a very Potent one- as well. Moreover, rising revolutionary seie-ial classes instinctively realize the- importance t,f art as a social weapon anel have always fnr^rel their own art ancl used it to challenge that of the cxist- lng ruling class. COMMUNISTS FROWN ON FREEDOM OF ARTISTIC EXPRESSION What she fails to point out is that roster carefully refrained from using oae adjective modern. All evidence Jhows that such references to art by Communist leaders are concerned *>th Socialist Realism, the only officially recognized Communist art style, * style which resembles the illustra- "'iis in our conservative magazines. . his makes good sense because Social- s' Realism, with its emphasis on Painstaking likeness, makes it, of °°Urse, a good vehicle for propaganda. The assertion that the Commu- (1'st leaders use modern art, which the, 'in. ey consider inimical to Communist 3n to undermine socictv, as a sort of carefully j "My. as a weapon to undermine ,''' society, as a sort of carefully fanned ideological epidemic, cannot substantiated and i.s absurd. Com- P'sts consider any privilege of free sOcietv as dangerous to Communist that the? ir hisWl ites a i' , . e-e.nt''"1 I Miss J t h'Ull''' 1 in Cotff ' subv«| -ntiicb i asscr''.,.. nunis»J work'" c"'''': they tear freedom of speech, ^'"lom of the press and freedom of istic- expression. There is no sound ( I'li-nee w-hatever that they are fos- cr '.^ any °f these freedoms in demo- s ''t'e society in order to weaken its js|"('ure. It would obviously be fool- M ■ attack realist art as Communist lo^ ,s,mply because the Communist r,v crship approves of it, but it is istjn more- foolish to attack non-real- sis,c art as communistic when it is con- ti),.- nt'v attacked by Communists and W„'r, fellow travelers all over the 'riel. li,, ls^ '>('ls takes extraordinary Iiber- t,, *'th truth in presenting evidence ](|J)ri>vo this calumny. Her story is Cnlv ' borrowed from the speeches nl • B^essman Dondero, many of , many '' accusations against modern art ,|j modern artists have- already been lltyProved. She implies that Kandin- "i\ri ^-°"""issar of the 'Isms,'" was sr,,'Vt'd in the founding of the Mu- '"iltl!- '.'f N'"'l''"' A't- Miss 1'els pre- it Kandinskv (a great Rusher of abstract painting) was ix, Pionc 1 by Lenin in 1921 so that hi I '" P d Kru. Pf°P'e outside- Russia whom t|i,,'l(''"t distortions" might corrupt '''Hi "''''' She des hoped to soften up and de bt's how Kandin- sky was "brought to the United States" to become Vice President of the Societe Anonyme, a modern art organization. She then quotes Dondero directly, "The Societe Anonyme according to the American Art Annual vv as first organized as the Museum of Modern Art. The Museum of Modern Art founded in 1920, officered in 1923 and for years thereafter by Kandinskv. Rusrian Commissar of the 'Isms' becomes crystallized in 1929 as the present Museum of Modern Art. As an enduring link between the two, Alfred H. Barr, Jr., member of the Board of Directors of Societe Anonyme, is the Director of the present Museum of Modern Art. "The way was open," Miss Pels ad cl s, "for the virus of foreign- spawned 'Isms' to be injected into the bloodstream of American culture. . . ." It is hard in a brief space to sepa- rate the facts from the distortions and falsehoods in this story. For a brief period after 1918 Kandhisky did organize museums under the Soviet regime, but he was not a Communist and worked essentially for what he believed to be the free and experimental in art. His ideas were soon repudiated and his work undone bv the USSR, which he left in 1921 to teach abstract painting in Germany where he had nothing to do with politics. In 1923 he did accept the Vice Presi- dency of the New York Societe Anonyme, but the appointment was essentially honorary, since Kandinskv. 3,000 miles away, contributed little but bis name and the loan of some pictures. Miss Pels to the contrary, Kandinskv never in his life set foot in America. Furthermore a way for the "foreign spawned 'Isms' " was not opened by the Societe Anonyme in 1920, but by a group of American artists anel art patrons who in 1913 organized a large- exhibition of modern art. Nicknamed "The Armory Show," it was presented in New York and later at the Art Institute of Chicago. The Societe Anonyme was not "first organized as the Museum of Modern Art." In order to clarify its purpose it added the words "museum of modern art" as a parenthetical subtitle to its name. The subtitle, however, was so little used that when the present Museum of Modern Art wets organized in 1929 none of its founders was aw arc- that they had borrowed the secondary name of an older institution. Except for this unintentional coincidence of name, there was no connection whatever between the- Societe Anonyme founded bv Miss (Catherine Dreier in 1920 and tin- Museum of Modern Art, initiated in 1929 bv Miss Lillie P. Bliss. Mrs. John D. Rockefeller, Jr., and Mrs. Cornelius J. Sullivan. Alfred II. Hair, Jr., whom Congressman Don dero discerns as the. "enduring link" between the two did eventually become a board member of the Societe Anonyme but that was in 1950, when he was no longer Director of the Museum of Modern Art, and primarily to help in cataloging the collection of the Societe Anonyme which nine years before had become the property of Yale University. Incidentally, when the collection which Mr. Dondero and Miss Pels consider such a menace was accepted by Yale, President Seymour wrote Miss Dreier, the donor, saying: "Your benefaction will not only be of lasting usefulness to the university, but to the entire country." MANY CHURCHES PATRONS OF MODERN ART The article further charges that communism is using modern art in its fight against religion and that modern art is sacrilegious and in essence anti- Christian ancl that the churches, particularly the Roman Catholic Church. have officially condemned it. This is not true. No church has officially condemned modern art, and, in fact, the article doc-s a disservice to the churches of Catholic, Protestant and Jewish faiths which are important patrons of modern art. Modern architecture-, which is so closely related to modern painting and sculpture, is increasingly accepted for church buildings. One out of every four churches being built in this country today is modern, including the Corpus Christi Roman Catholic Church in San Fran- Forum News. .//. 1956 Some modern religious art is highly abstract, such as this "Crown of Thorns'' which won the coveted first prize at the 1955 Pittsburgh International Exhibition of Contemporary Painting. The artist, Alfred Monessier, is a devout French Catholic painter who has decoroted two churches in France and one in Switzerland. Page 15 ■ i
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