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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
File 014
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 014. 1956-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. August 13, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/83.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-06). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 014. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/83

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 014, 1956-06, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed August 13, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/83.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date June 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 014
Transcript MODERN ART and FREEDOM Is freedom the parent of modern art, as indicated by Rene d'Harnoncourt in this article, or is communism its parent, as contended by Esther Julia Pels' article, Art for Whose Sake? published in our February, 1956, issue? After you read this rebuttal by the Director of the Museum of Modern Art of New York, perhaps you'll be interested in securing reprints of both of these articles on this controversial subject. by Rene d'Harnoncourt Director of the Museum of Modern Art in New York THE historical inaccuracies and misrepresentations in the article on modern art which first appeared in the October issue of the American Legion Magazine and was reprinted in the February issue of Facts Forum News, gives such a distorted picture of the subject that they should be corrected in the interests of truth and fair play. We greatly appreciate Facts Forum News' offer to publish a reply. Every age must find its own way to express the ideas it generates. No age- has ever successfully expressed itself in the exact language or imagery of the past. New forms of expression reflecting new ways of looking at the world, whether presented by the philosopher Socrates, the scientist Gal- lileo or the painter Cezanne have always been under attack bv contemporaries who find them incomprehensible and disturbing. In times of insecurity this sense of disturbance often turns into acute unxiety and tbe character of the attacks against the new becomes violent. In such times everything unfamiliar is looked upon by some people with suspicion and fear. In the field of the arts. these attacks are as old as art itself and follow well established patterns. At first new forms of expression are condemned because thev- do not live up to yesterday's artistic canons. Later Page 12 these art forms and their creators arc- decried as tools of force destructive to established society. The attacks on impressionism in France at the end of the 19th century offer a good example of this. In the wake of the disastrous Franco-Prussian war, France was shaken by political unrest, based on fear of Germany and anarchism and accompanied by outbursts of anti-Semitism. These anxieties manifested themselves in many ways and affected even the criticism of the new art movement. Painters who are today universally popular and widely acclaimed as masters eif 19th century art, men such at Renoir. Cezanne, Monet and Degas, were indiscriminately attacked because of their style of painting and called anarchists, Communists, decadents and imbeciles. The fact is that these painters represented the most divergent political views: Cezanne, the son of a banker, was a conservative, Degas a reactionary, Renoir leftist in sympathies, and Monet politically inert. Yet all of them were indiscriminately tarred by the- same brush of radicalism because their critics, led by the academic artists of that time, didn't understand or like their paintings and felt that somehow thev must be subversive. This campaign played a decisive part in causing the French National Museum to reject some ol their paintings at that time —a el, which is deplored in France to'''1-. because of the irreparable loss , caused to the cultural resources the country. In recent vears the outstanding & amples of this type of attack n»jj been given to us by the leaders of'. totalitarian states who consider freedom of individual expression ' ;'|! gerous to the enforcement of the d<* matic order they established. x similar attacks on modern art W issued from the Nazi Brown Hoi''-' Munich anel from the Kremlin in M » cow. Their conte-nt and even tt> , language in condemning modern ' are often indistinguishable. Adject1* such as nonsensical, inhuman, df» erate and perverted appear in M same context in the speeches of H1 ,- as they do in the writings of Kemp" - Hitler, of course, added the eptfM un-German and Bolshevistic w|Vj] Kemenov (speaking for Stalin) c*jj modern art capitalistic, imperii'"' and bourgeois. J Such fear-generated attacks on 9j forms of expression are by no !"■ limited to totalitarian states. In ^ Ka- wo r <-'..,„,„: >ts Se< lotion, - i Tv'"' - RVei >< Ti: the very danger which totalitarifjj presents to free men has engen^ y fear and distrust among people "J in a free society. It is unfortunate ,tf this reaction to a very real threat <*j leads people to adopt attitude Fails Font \i Ni.ws. jun*- ?aem°rit E>bsta grw.as s, S, !!"e '■
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