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Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
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Facts Forum. Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 013. 1956-06. University of Houston Libraries. University of Houston Digital Library. Web. July 14, 2020. https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/82.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum. (1956-06). Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 013. Facts Forum News, 1955-1956. University of Houston Libraries. Retrieved from https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/82

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

Facts Forum, Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956 - File 013, 1956-06, Facts Forum News, 1955-1956, University of Houston Libraries, accessed July 14, 2020, https://digital.lib.uh.edu/collection/1352973/item/139/show/82.

Disclaimer: This is a general citation for reference purposes. Please consult the most recent edition of your style manual for the proper formatting of the type of source you are citing. If the date given in the citation does not match the date on the digital item, use the more accurate date below the digital item.

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Title Facts Forum News, Vol. 5, No. 6, June 1956
Series Title Facts Forum News
Creator
  • Facts Forum
Publisher Facts Forum
Date June 1956
Language eng
Subject
  • Anti-communist movements
  • Conservatism
  • Politics and government
  • Hunt, H. L.
Place
  • Dallas, Texas
Genre
  • journals (periodicals)
Type
  • Text
Identifier AP2.F146 v. 5 1956; OCLC: 1352973
Collection
  • University of Houston Libraries
  • Facts Forum News
Rights No Copyright - United States
Item Description
Title File 013
Transcript °ost in human servitude has been tragically high. They are Ike those of us who admire the pyramids, the palaces, the temples, and the coliseums which despotic rulers once Produced out eif slave labor. We are only dimly conscious °f the cost in terms of human misery. So it is with the peoples of less-developed lands xvho are Wormed in extravagant terms of the industrial monuments w'liich have been built by the Soviet masters of 220 million subject peoples. And when Soviet propaganda says to less-developed Peoples, "See what we have done for ourselves; with our e'P, you can do the same," there is a strong temptation ■ accept that so-called help. The political leaders of these countries, however wise lll'v may be- and however patriotic thev may be, will find " difficult to resist the public pressures which Soviet Propaganda arouses, unless there is some alternative'. The industrial nations e>f the West, with matured and 'Sorous economies and much well-being, can and must Provide such an alternative. w Estern efforts to advance the economic well-being of ne less-developed countries are nothing new. We need °t be panicked by the new Soviet economic policy. With or without the so-called competition of the Soviet ."'on. we propose to go forward with sound policies to "the economic progress of less-developed countries. Normally, under our system, private capital could and „ °tild do the job. And, indeed, much private capital today 7J*s into many less-developed countries. Hut it flows only here the political anel economic risks are deemed toler- 'e- In much of the world, these risks are such that private aPital is not ready to take them. If capital is to be found, .^bstantial part must be provided on a public basis t "H spreads the- risk so that it r'"s of any single- individual. ''is is one of the purposes of our mutual security Ogram which now, in one form or another, is in its eighth v'"'■ 1 he economic part of that program amounts this ^ (ending June- 3(1) to about $1,700,000,000. Much of * is used to help our allies, particularly in the Far East 0r in Asia, to support adequate military establishments a$ "H-ir own. Of the- total, approximately $600 million will la 'f' ^ 'oan '"' "rant, in capita] development in other a pi i not appreciable in year we are asking Congress to appropriate- for » T|* ,v . year's economic program $100 million more than is ^''able for this year. The capacity to spend wisely ^Pends on many factors, and we should not appropriate, •j-, a Panic, merely because of Soviet economic activities. Uri ?r<" 's, however, need for somewhat greater flexibility, j? '°r greater continuity, as regards support for long- Se projects. tiifi°me °f tne development projects which are most sig- 'or°'i'nt Wl" '''k'' severa' years to complete-. It is difficult ])tr "' countries concerned to arrange for financing these lot ■ S ""less United States support can be- relied upon Ei '°r one year at a time, but for several years. Also, I,,, ' ' nited States support, it is easier for them to procure <!.s from other sources, such as the World Bank. tne e believe, therefore, that the United States goveni- *s |.should have authority to commit sonic such amount jir(j. ,K) million ei year for several years for long-range ^o s wnich Ul" develop to an important degree the tl,'")ni'e strength of less-developed countries. Without "mite-el, long-range authority we take a risk which is U's Forum News, June, 1956 quite unjustified, having regard to the relatively small cost of avoiding it. If our nation and the other free nations play their proper part, we can face the future not with complacency — that would be disastrous — but with confidence. I do not wish to minimize the threat of the Soviet "new look," of which the economic campaign is a part. Economic assistance knows no territorial limits. And we must count on the Soviets and their local Communist parties to press their policies with vigor. But we should reflect that Communist successes in the world so far have come when Red armies were at hand. No people has willingly accepted the Soviet type of Communist dictatorship. Communist open aggression has now been checked by the cohesion, resolution, vigilance, and strength of the free nations. Let us never forget that this is what deflected the Soviet rulers from primary reliance upon violence to which they were dedicated by creed and which they are skilled to practice. They came up against the granite of a declared and strong resolve. If that granite should turn to putty, then violence and threat of war could again become the order of the day. Meanwhile, we helve new problems. These will require new efforts, without relaxation of the old cohesion, resolution, vigilance, and strength. But the new efforts will be of a kind that is in accord with our tradition. This nation was conceived with a sense of mission and dedicated to the extension of freedom throughout the world. President Lincoln said of our Declaration of Independence that there was "something in that Declaration giving liberty, not alone to the people of this country, but hope for the world for all future time. It was that which gave promise that in due time the weights should be lifted from the shoulders of all men and that all men should have an ecpial chance." That has been the spirit which has animated our people- since they came together as a nation. We have, it is true. acquired much for ourselves. But also we have had in large- measure the greatest of all satisfactions — that is the satisfaction which comes from creating and from sharing. We have created at home and we have also created abroad. We have shared here at home anel we have shared abroad. Today the greatest opportunity for creation and for sharing lies in those areas which, possessed of great economic and human potentials, have not yet realized the opportunities which are theirs. We have- unprecedented resources with which tei create and with which to share. Our 160 million people, working in freedom and with ample leisure, produce over three times as much as do the 220 million of the Soviet Union working in servitude. Our industrial techniques arc- beyond compare. Our desire to create and to share with others i.s not a political plot; it is an expression of the spirit which has long animated our nation. It is not a product of government; it is a product of the faith of our people. Let me conclude with words which Benjamin Franklin wrote from Paris on May 1, 1777: "It is a common observation here that our cause is the cause of all mankind, and that we are fighting for their liberty in defending our own. It is a glorious task assigned us by Providence; which has, I trust, given us spirit and virtue ecpial to it, and will at hist crown it with success. Page II I ' r I
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